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Патент USA US2105155

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' Patented Jan. 11, 1.938
. ,
2,105,155
‘UNITED STATES PATENT ; FFICE
2,105,155
‘ >
.
-
5
NITROCELLULOSE EMULSIONS
Malcolm C. Moore, Newark, DeL, asslgnor to Her
cules Powder Company, Wilmington, met, a
corporation of Delaware
'
'
No Drawing. Application February 7,1935,
_Serial No. 5,405
'
18 Claims. (Cl. 134-79)
“ This invention relates to an improvement in
?ed with water through the medium of an emul- _
nitrocellulose emulsions and more particularly to
such emulsions wherein the nitrocellulose solu
siiying'agent comprising a sodium salt of a half
tion is pigmented.
for example, sodium lauryl ‘sulphate, sodium
stearyl sulphate, sodium cetyl sulphate, etc., or
mixtures thereof, combined with methyl cellulose.‘
»
Heretofore nitrocellulose emulsions of both the
water-in-oil and the oiléimwater type have been
known. However, where the nitrocellulose solu—
ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic-alcohol, as,
Emulsions in accordance with this invention
tion included in such emulsions, and more par vwill, generally speaking, be of the oil-in-water
' ticularly in emulsions of the oil-in-water type, type. The nitrocellulose solution carrying a pig
10 has contained a pigment, such emulsions have .
ment having a tendency-to break the emulsion,
been of very low stability and hence of limited
practical use.
’
'
either through the release of water-soluble elec
trolyte or by physical action, may contain such
1.0
In prior‘ practice, it has been found, for exam- , other ingredients as may be necessary for the
ple, thatoil-in-Waterdtype emulsions of nitro--,
cellulose solutions containing, for example, zinc
oxide in suiiicient quantity to give desired cover
~20
production of, for example, a coating composi
tion, or as may be desired. The emulsifying 15
agent comprising essentially a sodium salt or a
ing power, are of suchlow stability as tube of
half-ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic alco
little practical value. Again, nitrocellulose emul
sions, more particularly of the oil~in—water ‘type,
in ,which ‘the nitrocellulose'solution contains a
hol combined with methyl céllulose, but, if de
‘which act as electrolytes, ‘as, for example, Chinese
blue, are of low stability and consequently of
more speci?cally will desirably for ‘best results,
though not essentially, include solutions of‘nitro
cellulose having a concentration of nitrocellulose
within the range about 10% to 40%. The ratio
pigment containing water-soluble substances
_ little practical value.
sired, may include additional ingredients or emul
sifying agents,
.
-
.
Emulsions in accordance with this invention, 20
Heretcfore,‘ various efforts have been made to
render emulsions of pigmented solutions of nitro ' of nitrocellulose solution to water in the ultimate 25
cellulose stable. Thus, for example, in the case emulsions will be desirably within the range
of pigments containing water-soluble substances about 2:1-4z1 by weight and the emulsifying
which act as electrolytes, such substances have agent will desirably be present in amount less
been removed from the pigment by extraction than the amount of nitrocellulose in the'emulprior to addition of the pigment to the nitro
sion. In any event, the methyl cellulose ingredi
cellulose solutionv and emulsi?cation. In the ent of the emulsifying agent will be in amount in
case of pigments containing water-soluble sub
su?l'cient to deléterlously aiiect the integrity of‘
stances which act as electrolytes, extraction - the ultimate film formed by the nitrocellulose and, 7
-, o of the pigment has proved substantially e?e'ctiv‘e.
generally speaking, the amount of methyl cellu
However, extraction adds to the cost of the ulti
lose will be less than the amount of sodium salt 35
mate emulsions and is, to the extent of the added of a half-ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic a1
cost, disadvantageous. In the case of pigments cohol included in the emulsifying agent.
such as zinc oxide, which are necessarilyincluded
In the preparation of emulsions in accordance“
in nitrocellulose _ solutions in relatively large with this-invention any desired type of nitro
quantity in order to obtain desired covering pow
cellulose may be used. The particular type of _
er, and which, it is believed, act to break the ul
nitrocellulose chosen will'depend upon the ulti
timate~ emulsions by physical action, no eifectlve
means has heretofore been known for avoiding
lack of stability in‘the ultimate emulsions.‘
Now in accordance with this invention, it has
been found that highly stable emulsions of solu
tions of‘ nitrocellulose, more particularly of the
oil-in-water type, wherein the nitrocellulose so-_
50 lutions contain a pigment or pigments having a
tendency to break or render unstable the ultimate
emulsion, either through the release to the aque
one phase of water-soluble substances acting as
electrolyteshor by physical action, can ,be pro
Ll Ll
duced.
_
_
.
.
,
.
Generally speaking, nitrocellulose emulsions in
accordance with this invention comprise nitro
cellulosein solution in a substantially water-im
miscible solvent or solvent mixture and pigment.
(50
having a tendency to break the emulsion emulsi
mate use of the emulsion. . Generally speaking, , ,
nitrocelluloses of thetype heretoforeused in lac
quers and enamels will be used. The nitrocellu
lose may have a wide range of viscosity, depend
ing upon ultimate use of the emulsions. Thus,
for example, the nitrocellulose may have a vis
cosity, on the basis of Hercules seconds, of one‘
quarter or one-half second or lower, or the nitro
cellulose may be of relatively high viscosity, for 50
example, 15-20 seconds, or even higher,
, -
Any desired solvent or solvent mixture for the
nitrocellulose may be used. Thus, for example,
the solvent may comprise hexyl acetate, butyl 55
acetate, octyl acetate, amyl propionate, amyl‘
butyrate, methyl cyclohexanone, cyclohexanol
acetate, butyl butyrate, butyl propionate, amyl
acetate, or mixtures thereof. >Again, I various
diluents may be included with thesolvent, as, 60
2
2,105,155
.
for example, xylol, butyl alcohol, amyl alcohol,
will desirably be extracted with methanol, ‘for
etc., or mixtures thereof. The particular solvent ' example, in a Soxhlet extractor for the removal
or solvent mixture including a diluent or dilu
ents which may be used in the case of any given
emulsion will be dictated by the ultimate use
of water-soluble constituents or impurities, as
sodium sulphate, prior to use.
‘
In emulsions in accordance with this invention,
for which the emulsion is intended, the type of ‘ as has been indicated, pigments characterized by
surface to which it is to be applied, the conditions a tendency to break emulsions of the character
under which it is to be dried, etc. The nitro-_ contemplated will be included in the nitrocel
, cellulose solutionmay contain gvarious ingredients lulose solution phase of the emulsion. Thus, for
example, the nitrocellulose solution phase may 10
10 adapting it for the formation of‘, for example, a contain pigments having a tendency to break
?lm or coating having desired- characteristics.
' Thus, for example, the nitrocellulose solution
may contain various ingredients generally used
in the formation of lacquers or lacquer enamels,
15 such, for example, as plasticizers, as triphenyl
emulsions of the character contemplated by phys
ical action, such as zinc oxide. Again, pigments
having a tendency to break emulsions of the
character contemplated through release of water 15'
phosphate, tricresyl phosphate, etc., or mixtures
soluble electrolytes, such as Chinese blue, may
thereof. The usual gums and resins, such as, for
example, ester gum, dammar gum, terpinene
comprising nitrocellulose solutions pigmented
maleic anhydride, glyptal type resins, etc., may
20 be included. Where a plasticizer and/or a gum
or resin is included in the nitrocellulose solution,
such may be included in any desired proportion,
dependent upon the characteristics desired for
the ?lm or coating to be ultimately produced with
25 use of the emulsion.
'
The emulsifying‘ agent, as has been indicated,
will comprise essentially a sodium salt of a half
ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic alcohol, as,
for example, sodium lauryl sulphate, sodium
30 cetyl sulphate, sodium stearyl sulphate, etc. and
methyl cellulose. The emulsifying agent may in
clude additional emulsifying ingredients, as, for
be included.
Again, the stability of emulsions
withv carbon black, and which are readily pro
duced, is very largely increased by virtue of this 20
invention.
As illustrative of practical embodiment of this
invention, for example, an emulsion in accord
ance therewith wherein a high percentage of
zinc oxide is contained in the nitrocellulose solu 25
tion, may be produced using a nitrocellulose solu
tion made up on the following formula:
Formula No. 1
Per cent
Nitrocellulose (viscosity 1/2" Hercules)___
18
Dammar gum _________________________ __ .
5.4
Castor
6.0
oil ____________________________ __
example, a soap, sulphonated castor oil, a naph
thalenesulphonic' acid derivative, or other emul
sifying agent, which will be inert to the essential
Dibutyl phthalate _____________________ _._
3.0
Zinc oxide ____________________________ __
18.0
lauryl sulphate, and non-deleterious to the nitro
Ethyl alcohol _________________________ __
Hiilash solvent naphtha _______________ __
,85 ingredients, 1. e. methyl cellulose and sodium
cellulose.
‘
'
The essential ingredients of the emulsifying
40 agent, i. e. a sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate
of a higher aliphatic alcohol and methyl cel
lulose,. may be included in widely varying pro
Butanol (of which 7.6% is carried by the
8 35'
3.6
10.6
1.3
Toluol ________ __' ______________________ __
Octyl acetate _________________________ _; 12.4 40
12.4
Sec. 'hexyl acetate _____________________ __
nitrocellulose) ___; _________ __‘_______ __
100.0
portions. ‘ Generally speaking, the sodium salt of
a half-ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic alcohol
45 .will be included in amount in excess of the‘
amount of methyl cellulose. The amount of
methyl cellulose generally will be maintained
relatively low. The total‘amount of the emulsify
ing agent included in any particular emulsion
will, generally speaking, be not inaexcess of that
50
- required for the production of an emulsion hav
ing desired stability.
Further, desirably, the methyl cellulose con
30
The nitrocellulose solution made up on the
above formula, and which, it will be noted, con 45
tains 18% of zinc oxide, is emulsi?ed with dis
tilled water containing in solution 0.4% methyl
cellulose and 0.5% sodium lauryl sulphate on the
ratio of two parts nitrocellulose solution to one
part distilled water. The sodium lauryl sulphate 50
will desirably be pure, that is to say, free from
water-soluble impurities.
The emulsi?cation
may be effected in any convenient or desired ‘
tent of the emulsifying agent. whether the emul- ‘ manner, as, for example, by‘ mixing the nitrocel
55 sifying agent ‘consists of methyl cellulose and lulose solution and water and passing the mix
55
'
a sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate of a higher ture through a homogenizer. .
‘Again, the nitrocellulose solution made up on
aliphatic alcohol alone, or whether it includes
additional ingredients or emulsifying agents, will the above formula may be emulsi?ed in water
be kept low and desirably will not be in excess" on the ratio of two parts of nitrocellulose solu- '
of about 0.65% by weight on the non-volatile or tion to one part of,distilled water, the water
so ?lm-forming ‘ingredients of the nitrocellulose
solution in order that the integrity of the ulti
mate nitrocellulose ?lm, and'more particularly
with respect to water resistance, will not be dele
teriously affected. Preferably the amount of
as ' methyl
cellulose willrbe less than. 0.65% by weight
of the non-volatile ‘or ?lm forming ingredients
and an amount within‘ the range about 0.3% to ‘_
I about 0.4% will usually be su?lcient.
-'In emulsions in accordance with this invention,
70 ' the
sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate of a-high
fer aliphatic alcohol ingredient of the emulsifying.
agent will‘desirably," though not essentially,- be
l
a
in
containing in solution 0.2%-0.35% methyl cellu
lose, 0.5% sodium lauryl sulphatefree from wa-~
ter-soluble impurities and 1% .sulphonated cas- '
tor oil (75% grade).
The above emulsions embodying this invention 65
will be of the oil-in-water type and will have
high stability. despite the high percentage of zinc
oxide contained in suspension in the nitrocel
lulose solution phase.- In distinction, emulsions
‘as heretofore known, wherein the nitrocellulose
solution phase ,contained zinc oxide in any sub-,
stantial amount, much less in the amount con
tained in the above emulsions, would have such '
free from, ‘water-soluble constituents. Thus,’ low stability "as to render them substantially
75
where commercial-sodium salts‘ are used, they. impractical for commercial use.
- 2,105,155
As further illustrative of the practical adap~
tatlon ofthis invention, for example, a nitro
cellulose emulsion containing in the nitrocel
lulose solution phase a high percentage of a
pigment comprising Chinese blue and titanium
dioxide, may vbe made up on the following
_ formula:
'
Per cent
Dammar gum____:__'.__. ______________ __
5.4
Plasticlzer (2 parts castor oil, :1 part lindol)
Blue (32 parts Chinese blue, 3 parts tita
9.0
nium dioxide) pigment ______________ __
Ethyl
7.0
alcohol_v___‘_ _________ __- _________ __
3.6
Butanol (of which 7.6% is carried by the
nitrocellulose) ___________ ___ _________ __
11.55
T011101 _______ __i __________ -_‘_-___'._ _____ __
1.8
Hi?ash naphtha ______________________ __ 13.35
20 See. hexyl acetate _________________ __'_~>_'__ 15.15
Octyl acetate _________________________ _'_ 15.15
_
25
taining 0.30% methyl cellulose, 0.5% puri?ed
sodiumv lauryl sulphate, and 1.0% sulphonated
castor oil (75% grade) using a colloid mill or
homogenizer. The resultant emulsion will dis
ing.
'
10 Nitrocellulose (viscosity V2" Hercules)--- 18
15
Two hundred parts of the above lacquer phase
are emulsi?ed with 80 parts distilled water con
play avery'high stability or resistance to break- .
Formula No. 2
'
, 3
,
100.00
'
It will now be appreciated that this invention
contemplates an emulsion of a solution of, nitro 10
cellulose emulsi?ed through the medium of an
emulsifying agent comprising a sodium salt of a
half-ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic alcohol
-and methyl cellulose. More particularly, this in
. vention contemplates a nitrocellulose emulsion
including a pigment having a tendency to break
the emulsion and, still more particularly, a nitro
cellulose emulsion containing zine oxide.
'
'
It will be understood that it is not contemplated
that this invention shall be limited to the use‘of 20'
any particular type of nitrocellulose, solvent or
solvent mixture, or other ingredients, nor to any
particular concentration of nitrocellulose, or to
The nitrocellulose solution in accordance with
the above formula. is emulsi?ed with water on
the ratio of 2 parts of nitrocellulose solution to
1 part of distilled water, the distilled. water con
anyparticular ratio of (nitrocellulose solution to
water, or to other details involved in the above
description ‘and examples of adaptation of this
invention to practice. It will be understood that
taining in solution 0.4% methyl cellulose and
Again,
while the use of a combination of methyl cellu- '
30 0.5% puri?ed sodium lauryl sulphate.
the nitrocellulose solution on the above formula
and containing a relatively high percentage of
Chinese blue may be emulsi?ed on the ratio of
two parts of nitrocellulose solution to one part
35 oi’ distilled water containing 0.35% methyl cel
lulose, 0.5% puri?ed sodium lauryl sulphate, and
1.0% sulphonated castor oil.
7
The emulsifioation may be carried out as in
dicated above or in any suitable manner. The
40 emulsion will be of the oil-in-water type and
will have ahigh degree of stability.
In ‘comparison, an emulsionformed with use
of a, nitrocellulose solution made up on the above
- v formula and containing Chinese blue, where so- ‘
dium lauryl sulphate, methyl cellulose and sul
lose and a sodium salt of a half~ester sulphate
of a higher aliphatic alcohol as the emulsifying 30
agent in emulsions in accordance with this in
vention is contemplated as essential, the use of an
emulsifying agent or agents in addition to _a
sodium salt or salts of the class indicated and
methyl cellulose is not excluded. ,
~
What I claim and desire to protect by Letters
Patent is:
'
1. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water-immisciblesolution of nitrocel
lulose emulsi?ed with water through the medium
of an emulsifying agent comprising methyl cel
lulose. and a ‘sodium salt of a half-ester sul
phate of a higher aliphatic alcohol, the methyl
cellulose being in amount not in excess of about
0.65% by weight of the non-volatile ingredients
phonated castor oil, as indicated, are used as . of the. nitrocellulose solution and not less than 45
an amount sumcient to have appreciable emulsi
over a ‘period in excess of two months,’ while an fying action.
emulsion made upwith the same nitrocellulose
2. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
the emulsifying agent, will retain its stability
50' solution, with the blue pigment reduced from
stantially‘water—immiscible solution of nitrocel
7% to _4% and with use of an emulsifying agent lulose emulsi?ed with water through the medium 50
comprising 0.5% puri?ed sodium lauryl sulphate of an emulsifying agent comprising methyl cel
and 1.0% sulphonated castor oiLIbut without the lulose and a sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate
inclusion of any methyl cellulose, will only re
of a higher aliphatic alcohol, the methyl cellu
main stable for about two weeks.
lose being in amount of about 0.3% to about 0.4%
As further illustrative, for example, a-nitro- ' by'weight of the non-volatile ingredients of the
cellulose emulsion pigmented with carbon black nitrocellulose solution. I
maybe made up on the following formula:
3. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water~immiscible solution‘ of nitrocel
lulose emulsi?ed with water through the medium 60
Nitrocellulose (viscosity 1/2'.’ HerculesL--- 20.0 of an emulsifying agent comprising methyl cel
-Dam_ma_r gum_-__' ______________________ __ 5.4
lulose and sodium lauryl sulphate, the methyl
Dibutyl phthalate ______ _‘__-_ ____________ __
3.0
cellulose being in amount not in excess of about
Tricresyl phosphate _________________ _~____ 2.6'
v0.65% by weight of the non-volatile ingredients
Blown castor oil ______ _; ___________ -;_.___ 5.4 _
of the nitrocellulose solution and not less than
Carbon {black __________________________ __ 2.0
an amount sumcient to have appreciable emulsi
60
,
‘
'
.
I
.
v
\
Per cent
' Octyl /,acetate____~ ______________________ __ 13.9
Sec.-hexyl acetate ______ __'__,_, _________ __-_' 13.9
Butyl'alcohol .(of which 8.6% is carried ‘by
_
the nitrocellulose) ____‘________________ __ 14.0
Hi-?ash solventnaphtha __________ _____,___-13.8
.
'l'oluol _______________________________ _-___
.
Ethyl
2.0
fying action.
4. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel
lulose containing a pigment having a tendency 70
to break the emulsion emulsi?ed with water
.‘through the medium of an emulsifying agent
alcohol _________ -g _____ .._=__ ______ __
4.0
comprising methyl cellulose and a sodium salt
of a half-ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic al
100.0 cohol, the methyl cellulose being in amount not
75
4-
.
in excess of about 0.65% by weight of the
2,105,155
groduced on breaking and drying of the emul
non
volatile ingredients of the nitrocellulose solution
and not less than an amount su?lcient to have
appreciable emulsifying action.
5. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel
~ lulose, having a concentration of nitrocellulose
within the range 10%-40%, emulsi?ed in dis
perse phase in water ‘containing methyl cellulose
10
20
25
_
on.
,
11. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel
lulose containing a pigment having a tendency to
break the emulsion emulsi?ed with water through
the medium of an emulsifying agent comprising
methyl cellulose and sodium lauryl sulphate,
the
methyl
cellulose being
in
an
amount
which is sumcient to have substantial emulsifying 10
and a sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate of a r
action but less than that which is su?lcient dele
higher aliphatic alcohol in solution, the ratio of teriously
to affect the water resistance of the
nitrocellulose solution to water ranging between nitrocellulose
?lm produced on breaking and dry
about 2:1 to 4:1 by weight, and the methyl cel
ing
of
the
emulsion.
lulose being in amount lnsu?lcient to deleterious
12. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
ly affect the water-resistance of the nitrocellulose stantially ‘water-immiscible solution of nitrocel 15
?lm produced on drying of the emulsion and not lulose containing a pigment having a tendency
less than an amount su?lcient to have appre
to break the emulsion emulsi?ed in disperse phase
ciable emulsifying action.
in water containing methyl cellulose and sodium
6. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
lauryl sulphate in solution, the methyl cellulose 20
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel
being in an amount which is sufficient to have
lulose, having a concentration of nitrocellulose substantial emulsifying action but less than that
within the range 10%-40%, a pigmenttending which is su?icient deleteriously to aifect the water
to break the emulsion, emulsi?ed in disperse resistance of the nitrocellulose ?lm produced on
phase in water containing methyl cellulose and breaking and drying of the emulsion.
a sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate of a higher
13. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
aliphatic alcohol in solution, the ratio of nitro
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel
cellulose solution to water ranging between about lulose containing zinc oxide emulsi?ed in dis
2:1 to 4: 1 by weight and the methyl cellulose be
perse phase in water containing methyl cellulose
ing in amount insu?icient to deleteriously affect
30 the water-resistance‘ of the nitrocellulose ?lm
produced on drying of the emulsion and not less
than an amount su?lcient to have appreciable
emulsifying action.
7. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
- stantially water-irnmisciblesol'ution of nitrocel
lulose emulsi?ed with water, through the medium *
and a sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate of a 30
higher aliphatic alcohol, in solution in the water,
the methyl cellulose being in an amount which
is su?icient to have substantial emulsifying action
but less than that which is su?lcient deleteriously
to a?ect the water resistance of the nitrocellulose 35
?lm produced, on breaking and drying of the
of an emulsifying agent comprising methyl cel
emulsion.
lulose and a‘sodium salt of a half-ester sulphate ,
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel
of a higher aliphatic alcohol, the methyl cellu
4:0 lose being in an amount which ‘is sufficient to
have substantial emulsifying action but less than
that which is.su?lcient deleteriously to affect
the water resistance of the nitrocellulose ?lm pro
duced on breaking and drying of the emulsion.
8. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
‘
= 14. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
lulose containing zinc oxide emulsi?ed in disperse
‘phase in water containing methyl cellulose and
sodium lauryl sulphate in solution in the water, I
the methyl cellulose being in an amount which
is su?icient to have substantial emulsifying action
but less than that which is sufficient‘ deleteri 45
lulose emulsi?ed with water through the medium
of an emulsifying agent comprising methyl cel
ously to attest the water resistance of the nitro
cellulose ?lm produced on breaking and drying
of the emulsion.
lulose and sodium lauryl sulphate; the methyl cel
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel 50
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocel
lulose being in an amount which is sufficient to
have substantial emulsifying action but less than
that which is su?icient deleteriously to affect the
water resistance of the nitrocellulose ?lm pro
duced on breaking and drying of the emulsion.
9. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water-immiscible solution‘ of nitrocel
lulose emulsi?ed in disperse phase in water con
taining methyl cellulose and sodium lauryl sul
phate in solution, the methyl cellulose being in
' an amount which is su?icient to have substantial
emulsifying action but less than'that which is
sufllcient deleteriously to aifect the water resist
ance of'the nitrocellulose ?lm produced on break
ing and drying of the emulsion.
,10. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water-immiscible solution of nitrocellu
lose containing a pigment‘ having a tendency to
break the emulsion emulsi?ed with water through
the medium of an emulsifying agent comprising
15. A nitrocelluloseemulsion comprising a sub- ’
lulose, having a concentration of nitrocellulose
within the range 10%-40% and containing zinc
oxide, emulsi?ed in disperse phase in water con
taining methyl cellulose and a sodium salt of a
half-ester sulphate of a higher aliphatic alcohol 55
in solution, the ratio. of nitrocellulose solution to
water ranging between about 2: l to 4: 1 by weight.
the methyl cellulose being in an amount which
is su?icient to have substantial emulsifying action but less than that which is su?icient dele
teriously to affect the water resistance of the
nitrocellulose ?lm produced on breaking and
drying of the emulsion.
'
_
16. A nitrocellulose emulsion comprising a sub
stantially water-ir'nmiscible solution of nitrocel
lulose, having a concentration of nitrocellulose
within the range 10%-40% and containing zinc
oxide, emulsi?ed in disperse phase in water con
taining methyl cellulose and sodium ‘lauryl sul- .
phate in solution, the ‘ratio of nitrocellulose solu 70
methyl cellulose and a sodium salt of a half-ester
to water ranging between about 2:1 to 4:1
sulphate of a higher aliphatic alcohol, the methyl‘ tion
by weight, the methyl cellulose being in an
cellulose being in an amount which is su?lcient
is suf?cient to have substan-'
to have substantial emulsifying action but less amount which
less than that
than that which is su?lcient deleteriously to a1’-v tial emulsifying action but
"which is suillcient' deleteriously to affect the 15
15 fect thewater resistance of the nitrocellulose ?lm
2,105,150
'
water resistance '0! the nitrocellulose‘?lm pro
18. -A nitrocellulose emulsion containing a pig
duced on breaking and drying of the emulsion.
ment which has a tendency to break the emul
17. A nitrocellulose emulsion containing a. pig
sion comprising a. substantially water-immiscible
solution of nitrocellulose emulsi?ed in, disperse
ment which has a tendency to break the emul
#11 sion comprising a substantially water-immiscible phase in water which contains a small amount
solution of nitrocellulose emulsi?ed in disperse of both methyl cellulose and sodium cetyl sul
phate in solution.
‘ _ phasein water which contains a small amount of
both methyl cellulose and sodium stearyl sul
'
MALCOLM C. MOORE.
> phate inv solution.
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