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Патент USA US2105397

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Jan. 11, 1938.
6. cs. BARR ET AL
FENDER WELT
Filed Aug. 26, 1936,
2,105,397
Patented Jan. 11, 1938
2,105,397. I
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,105,397
FENDER WELT
.
Glen G. Barr, Union City, Ind., and Albert II.
Kirchner, Washington, D 0., assignors to
Backstay Welt Company, Union City, Ind., a
corporation of Indiana
> Application August 26, 1936, scrialfNo. 98,038
7 Claims. (Cl. 280-152)
Our invention relates to fender welts, i. e.,
Referring now to the drawing, the reference
cushioning. strips adapted to be interposed be-' , numeral l designates generally the external por
I tween certain sheet metal parts of automobiles,
such as between the body and fenders, to prevent
5 squeaks, rattles, etc. ,An important object of
the invention is to providea fender welt having
tion of a fender welt, i. e., the beaded edge which
is exposed to view and to the weather when the
interior portion, designated by the reference nu- 5
meral 2, is interposed in operative position be
tween adjacent and generally parallel surfaces
of two metal bodies, as for example an automo
I terior portion.
‘
bile body and the attaching ?ange of a fender.
'10 Further objects are concerned with generally 'The
portion i is conveniently made beaded, as 10
improving the durability of the sound-deadening by disposing a ply of ornamental weather-resist
‘portion under adverse'conditions consequent, upon ant fabric 3 around a filler cord 4. The material
loosening of the juxtaposed metal parts and rela
I is conveniently a coated textile fabric of the
tive movement of the same, resulting infrubbing class generically called imitation leather, and the
an ornamental weatherproof exterior portion and
an efficient cushioning and sound-deadening in
I ,15 of the welt.
‘ A further important object is the provision of
"a fenderv welt'st'ructure the sound-deadening por
tion of-which can be readily made in any desired
filler 4 may be a cord of twisted paper, cotton, 15
Jute, or the like. The covering for the filler is
extended in two spaced parallel plies from a side
of the filler. One of these plies, designated 5 in
Figs. 1, 2, and 3, is extended a considerable dis
go stallations and preferences.
‘tance from the bead ?ller to receive and support 20
'
Another object is ‘to provide a fender welt of the sound-deadening material which comprises
materials which‘ are inexpensive, efficient and an important element of the interior portion 2
durable, which can be satisfactorily die cut, and of the welt, and the other ply of the bead-cover
which 'wlll'possess a high degree of ?exibility.
ing fabric, designated 6 in all the figures, extends
.25 " An important principle of the invention resides‘ a much shorter distance from the filler. The 25
in the use, in the cushioning or sound-deadening sound-deadening material is interposed between
‘portion of the welt, of a crimped or crepe paper, the piles ,5 and 6, which may be stitched together,
employed preferably ina plurality of plies bonded preferably close to the' bead ?ller, as shown at ‘I
together by'a suitable waterproof adhesive and in Figs. 1, 3, and 4, or these two plies may be
?ller. We have found that crepe paper, the par
secured to the sound-deadening material by the 30
ticular character of which will be more fully ex
use of cement only, as shown in Fig. 2.
plained hereinafter, possesses certain important
The sound-deadening material which forms the
properties which render it de?nitely superior to important and operative part of the portion 2 of
‘any cushioning material which, so far as we are the welt is, according to the principles of our in
an vaware, has ever been heretofore used in fender vention, built up of crepe paper employed in a 35
I-welt constructions. In its broad aspects the in
plurality of superposed plies 8, 8. Crepe paper is
vention - contemplates the use. of this type of paper having a multiplicity of surface irregular
paper; and in certain embodiments of the inven
ities, comprising alternate juxtaposed ridges and
tion the paper‘ is specially folded and is associated depressions of more or less minute but readily dis- '
to with other elements of the welt in a particular cernible character. As a rule, the paper is orig- 40
fashion to produce a structure having certain inally smooth-surfaced and of uniform thickness
additional advantages, as will be explained here
and is subsequently creped' by causing it to pass
between rollers which introduce the character
_The invention is shown in certain preferred istic surface folds. This type of crepe paper is
thickness to suit the exigencies of particular in
inafter.
_
~
I
I
I
45 forms of embodiment in the acompanying draw
shorter in at least one dimension than the orig- 45
ing, in which each of the figures is a perspective inal sheet from which it was formed, and it is
view,‘showing one end in cross section, and in - freely extensible in the direction of that dimen
all of which the's'ame reference numerals desig
nate corresponding parts.
60
In the drawing, Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive illustrate
various formsof the fender welts proposed by our
invention, and Fig. 5 shows, on an enlarged scale,
sion when placed under tension to straighten out
the crimps or folds. ‘This type ofcrepe paper,
shown in Fig. 5, is the form preferred for the 50
sound-deadening element of our invention, but
we may use a paper of a somewhat different type,
a fragment of theorepe paper material which ‘ i. e., one which has been originally calendered to
constitutes an important element of the construc- I provide the desired surface elevations and depres
55
tion.
I
l
‘
sions.
It is to be understood that the term 55
I
2
2,105,397
“crepe paper” as used throughout this specifica
tion and in the appended claims includes orig
lnally smooth paper which has been crimped, as
well as paper initially formed with surface eleva
tions and depressions.
‘
is thus provided a resilient, yielding, sound
deadenlng surface of both sides of the web.
In Fig. 4 a further modi?cation is shown. In
this form of the invention the portion 9 of'the
bead ?ller covering fabric 3 is made somewhat
narrower than the portion 5 shown in Figs. 1-3,
‘and the plural plies of sound-deadening material
The crepe paper is used in a plurality of plies
' 8, 8, securely bonded together by an adhesive
such as a latex or asphaltum compound, which I are made somewhat wider than as shown in
Figs. 1 and 2 and somewhat narrower than as
is weather-resistant and more or less perma
10 nently ?exible. The portion 2 of the welt is . shown in Fig. 3, so that a portion of the plural 10
ply body may be folded over on itself and its
capable of being provided in any desired thick
edge butted against the extreme edge of thev
ness, within a relatively wide range of limits,
portion 9. The plies of sound-deadening mate
to suit different installations and manufacturers’
preferences, by the simple expedient of using rial may be made as thick as,,or somewhat thicker
than, the'ply 9, so that when the welt is com 15
15 plies of paper in greater or less number. This
pressed between the two metallic surfaces both
feature constitutes a distinct advantage of our
surfaces of the metal will be separated by the
invention and overcomes the di?iculty hereto,
fore experienced with welts in which the portion sound-deadening material. The Fig. 4 form of
to be interposed between the metal surfaces ofv construction has the advantage, possessed also
20 the automobile was made of textile fabric. Tex- I bythe Fig. 3 construction, of providing a cush 20
tile material suitable for use of this kind is in
herently thicker than the paper which we em
ploy, and it is not practical to use it in more
than a single ply, exclusive ‘ of the attaching
ioning surface for both metal surfaces, and in
addition it has the advantage, lacking from the
Fig. 3 construction, of presenting vno exposed raw
edge of multi-‘ply material adjacent to the bead
I, which of ‘course in practice is exterior of the
ply of coated fabric. Attempts to providecush
ioning portions of multi-ply textile fabric have
been uniformly unsuccessful because the result
metal parts and exposed to the weather. '
‘ Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive may be regarded as show
ing body was in the great majority of cases either
ing complete fender welts ready for perforation
too thick or'too thin.v No_knowntextile fabric ' to accommodate the usual bolts which secure the
having cushioning properties and the requisite
strength is available'in sheets of sufficient thin
ness to permit accurate gauging 'of' plural ply
thickness.
"
'
'
into tongued or pronged strips, as contemplated "
.
We are aware of the disclosure in United States
Patent
No.
1,808,259,
metal parts together, or they may belthought 30
of as blanks which can be die cut or otherwise
operated upon to'transform the web'portions 2
issued
to
Robert
C.
Schemmel on June 2, 1931, of the substitution of
'aply of a relatively heavy grade of paper for
the customary textile fabric of the internal por
tion 2 of the fender welt. Our present invention
is to be distinguished from, the paper ply of
the Schemmel patent in several important re
by the'Drangeid Patent No. 1,760,838 and the
' Schemmel Patent No. 1,808,259.
The welt is applied in the usual manner be
tween the fender ?ange and the body and the
customary bolts are drawn tight, compressing the
cushioning portion 2 of the welt. In time, rela
tive movement ofthe body and fender rubs the 40
paper surface and wears it smooth, ?attening
spects. The Schemmel paper was a relatively ' down its elevations. Theyieldability and resili
ence of the superposed plies of paper and ad
heavy grade, was smooth-surfaced, and was em
ployed in a single ply only. Its thickness pre
hesive are such that the somewhat diminished
vented i'ts use in plural plies, and in every respect
thickness of the worn body remains great enough 45
except cost it was indistinguishable from the to cushion the metal parts, and there is no
fraying or tearing of the cushioning body or the
common textile fabric ‘which it supplanted.
The portion 2 of our fender welt, formed as ?bers thereof such as occurs. when woven ‘.mate
50
hereinabove described, ‘is a cushioning body of
relatively .g-reat compressibility, characterized by
.a surface having a multiplicity 'of' alternate de
pressions and elevations. The cushioning ‘body
is exceedingly durable, and is very securely united
to the bead portion‘ I ,by the ply -5_-which backs
and supports it.
_
‘
A good fender welt must be ?exible‘ and ca
pable of being readily curved inLthe-f plane of
its web portion without appreciable distortion
60 thereof.
This is necessary to‘ accommodate the
welt ‘to the curved contours of automobile" fend
ers and the like. 'An important advantage of
our composite crepe paper body is its possession
of these two qualities in high degree, practically
without
regard to thethickness to which th
65
body may be built up.
'
In the form of the invention shown in Figs.
1 and 2 the sound-deadening material is disposed
on one face only of the skirt or web portion of
the welt. Fig. 3 illustrates a modi?cation in
which the multi-ply body is originally provided
in twice the width desired for the skirt. Half
of the body-is folded back on itself, with the
portion 5 of the covering fabric for the bead
?ller interposed between the two halves. There
rial wears under similar conditions of use.
,
It is believed that the principles of the, inven
tion'will be understood from the foregoing de
scription of certain preferred forms of embodi
ment. It is to be understood that the invention
is capable of embodiment instill further modi?ed 55
forms, and all such, modi?cations, ‘to the extent
that they incorporate the principles of the in
vention as defined by the appended claims, are
to be deemed within the scope and purview
thereof.
We claim:
.
'
60
.
.
1; A fender welt adaptedto be interposed be
tween adjacent ?at metallic surfaces in an auto
mobile body' or the like to prevent squeaks, rattles
and the like, said welt comprising an edge bead
and a web extending laterally'therefrom, said
web being built up of plural plies of creped paper
impregnated with and bonded ‘together by a
water-resistant substance.
2. A fender welt adapted to be interposed be 70
tween adjacent ?at metallic surfaces in an auto
mobile body or the like to prevent squeaks, rattles
and the like, said welt comprising an edge bead
and a web extending'laterally therefrom, said
web being built up of plural piles of creped 75
9,105,897
paper impregnated with and bonded together by
an asphaltic compound.
3. A fender welt adapted to be interposed be
tween adjacent ?at metallic surfaces in an auto
mobile body or the like to prevent squeaks, rattles
and the like, said welt comprising an edge bead
and a web extending laterally therefrom, said
‘ web being built up of plural plies of creped paper
impregnated with and bonded together by a latex
10 solution.
4. A fender welt comprising a layer of fabric
having a tensile strength greater than that of
creped paper, a bead filler encased in a marginal
portion of said fabric to provide an edge bead
from a side of which the body of the fabric ex
tends, and a ply of paper folded around the body
of the fabric and its opposite marginal edge and
secured to and supported by said body to form
the web portion of the welt.
20
5. A fender welt comprising a"'layer of fabric
having a tensile strength greater than that of
creped paper, a bead ?ller encased in a marginal
portion of said- fabric to provide an edge head
from a side of which the body of the fabric ex
KC Cd
tends, and superposed plural plies of creped paper
bondedtogether by a water-resistant substance
folded around the body of the fabric and its
3
opposite marginal edge and secured to and sup
ported by said body to form the web portion of
the welt.
6. A fender welt comprising a layer of textile
fabric having a hard surface coating which is
resistant to water, a bead ?ller encased in a mar
ginal portion of said fabric to provide an edge
bead from a side of which the body of the fabric
extends, and superposed plural plies of creped
paper bonded together by a water-resistant sub 10
stance folded around the body of the fabric and
its opposite marginal edge and secured to and 1
supported by said body to form the web portion
of the welt.
7. A fender welt comprising a layer of fabric 15
having a tensile strength greater than that of
creped paper, a bead ?ller encased in a marginal
portion of said fabric to provide an edge bead
from a side of which the body of the fabric ex
tends, and plies of paper impregnated with a 20
water-resistant substance secured to and sup
ported by the opposite surfaces of the body of
the fabric and having one free edge butted
against the free edge of the body of fabric.
GLEN G. BARR.
ALBERT H. momma.
25
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