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Патент USA US2105427

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Jan. 11, 1938.
C. K. MacDONALD
2,105,427
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR OPERATING ON SHOES
Filed Nov. 2, 1956
2 Sheets-Sheet l
Fig.1
//0
Jan. 11, 1938.
c. K. MacDONALD
2,105,427
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR OPERATING ON SHOES
Filed Nov. 2, 1936
2 Sheets-‘Sheet 2
Patented Jan. 11, 1938
2,i05,427
2,105,427
METHOD ANDv APPARATUS FOR OPERATING
ON SHOES
Clifford K. MacDonald, Brockton, Masa, assignm
to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, E’aten
son, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey
Application November 2, 1936, Serial No. 108,740
15 Claims.
This invention relates to methods and appa
ratus for operating on shoes and is illustrated
herein with reference to improved methods and
apparatus for removing soles from shoes.
u
Objects of the invention are to provide an im
proved method and an improved apparatus for
removing from shoe bottoms outsoles which have
been attached thereto by a strong bonding ce
ment, and to provide an improved hand device for
an O accomplishing the same purpose.
There are a number of cements in use today
for attaching soles to shoe bottoms which have
an exceptionally strong bonding power and a
tenacity in holding the sole to the shoe bottom
15 which effectively resists and sometimes prevents
(01. 12-4)
it non-adhesive. The projections on the rigid
blade and the heat for severing the cement bond
permit the blade to pass fairly rapidly between the
attached portions of the sole and shoe, thereby in
suring that the heat of the blade will not scorch
the shoe upper. The projections on the blade also
prevent it from slipping out from between the sole
and the shoe bottom during the sole removing
operation. Furthermore, the substantially instan
taneous breaking of the cement bond by the ap
plication of su?icient heat obviates the necessity
of applying excessive force in removing the sole
from the shoe bottom, thereby further preventing
the damaging of the shoe upper.
In another aspect the invention provides an im 15"
removal of the sole from the shoe, for example,
proved method for removing from shoe bottoms
in repair work without damaging the shoe upper.
One example of this cement is a synthetic rubber
like composition made by polymerizing chloro
prene and known commercially as “Du Prene”.
soles which have been attached thereto by a
The use of such a cement for attaching soles to
shoes is disclosed in United States Letters Patent
No. 2,061,296, granted November 17, 1936, upon an
application ?led in the name of Walter H. Wedger.
'‘ A characteristic of a cement of this type is that,
instead of taking on a hard glassy appearance
after it has become aged or cured, it retains some
of its original elasticity so that when it is at
pressure and heat to the stretched layer of cement
with the aid of a heated blade to break the ad
hesive bond between the sole and the shoe bottom.
With the above and other objects and features
in view the invention will now be described in
connection with the accompanying drawings and
thereafter pointed out in the claims.
In the drawings,
tempted to peel the sole from the shoe bottom by
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of an apparatus em~
bodying the present invention operating on a
1.7 P’ the means usually employed for that purpose, the
cement will not let go. If extreme force is applied
to tear the sole away from the shoe bottom this
cement will cling to both the sole and the shoe
bottom and will stretch and thereby effectively
3 resist the action of ordinary tools in freeing the
sole from the shoe.
In accordance with one feature of the present
invention means is provided for penetrating the
film of cement between a sole and a shoe bottom
as the sole is pulled away from. the shoe, said
means having projections thereon to facilitate
its penetrating action. In accordance with an
other ieature of the invention, means is provided
for heating the penetrating means to sever the
' stringy ?bers of the cement and thereby to assist
in breaking the bond between the sole and shoe
bottom. As herein illustrated, the penetrating
means comprises a rigid blade having projections
or teeth thereon especially adapted to penetrate
the ?lm of cement without cutting into the parts
operated upon. The means for heating the blade
to break the cement bond as the blade comes into
contact therewith is arranged to maintain said
blade at a fairly constant temperatue at least
55 high enough to break the cement bond and render
strong bonding cement which comprises pulling
a sole away from its shoe bottom to stretch the
cement layer located therebetween, and applying 20
shoe;
Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the operating in
strmnentalities of the apparatus;
Fig. 3 is a front elevation of a hand device or
tool forming a modi?cation of the invention, the
device being shown operating on a shoe;
Fig. 4 is a side elevation partly in section of the
hand device;
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary View, on an enlarged
scale, of the work engaging portion of the hand 40
device; and
Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the lower portion
of the hand device operating on a shoe.
The apparatus illustrated herein for removing
cement attached soles from shoes comprises an
upstanding base or frame iii (Fig. 1) the upper
end of which is bifurcated and provided with
?anges i2, M which support a carrier member N5
of heat conducting material such as brass or
copper secured to the ?anges by screws l8 and
spaced therefrom by bushings 20 of some insu
lating material such, for example, as asbestos
surrounding the screws.
At its upper portion the carrier member l6 has
mounted therein a ‘heating unit 22 connected in
2
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any usual manner to an electric current by a
switch 2Q whereby the unit may be energized to
heat the carrier member it. While heating units
of various sizes may be utilized, depending
largely upon the degree of heat found to be most
satisfactory for the particular type of work to
be operated upon, a 150 watt-unit capable of
generating a heat of between 300° to 400° F. has
been found to be very satisfactory in removing
10 soles which have been attached to shoes by a
strong bonding cement of the type referred to.
If, for economy or other reasons, a smaller heat
ing unit is desired, it should at least be of such
wattage that it will not only supply the heat
15 required for the work to be performed, but will
also maintain this heat fairly constant not
shoe from side to side as he moves it upwardly
against the blade so that the latter passes alter
natively down one side and then the other of the
forepart of the shoe between the opposite last
ing margins of the upper and the portion of the
sole attached thereto. The projections or teeth
32 on the blade penetrate the ?lm of cement
without cutting into the shoe upper, and the heat
of the blade breaks or severs the stretched
strings of cement as the sole is pulled away from 10
the shoe bottom by the operator. The heat is
suilicient to destroy the adhesive bond of the ce
ment upon contact of the blade therewith, there
by permitting the shoe and sole to be moved
along the blade with suiii'cient speed to insure 15
that the heat will not scorch the shoe upper.
withstanding losses by radiation or by conduc
tion due to contact of the heated parts with heat
After loosening the forepart of the sole the oper
ator may, if desirable, remove the ?ller material
conducting materials such, for example, as the
at the forepart of the shoe bottom and then pro
ceed to separate the shank portion of the sole 20
from the shoe by a similar operation. In break
ing the cement bond between the shank portion
of the sole and the shoe bottom the operator
preferably manipulates the blade so that the steel
shank piece in the shoe will not interfere with
the sole removing operation. In this way a sole
20 steel shank piece in a shoe. In other words, the
unit should be of such a size that it will generate
enough heat to balance or offset the ‘heat lost
through radiation or otherwise and will thus
maintain a substantially constant temperature
25 which is suf?ciently high to perform the work.
The lower portion of the carrier member 16 is
slotted vertically at 26 (Fig. 1) and in this slot is
mounted a rigid work engaging member or blade
28. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the upper por
30 tion of the member 28 is relatively thick, for
example, 1%,- of an inch in cross section and the
work engaging portion thereof is preferably
about % of an inch thick with its lower periphery‘
substantially semicircular in shape. The blade is
85 composed of metal such, for example, as iron
which has been attached to a shoe by a strong
bonding cement such as “Du Prene” may be read
ily removed from the bottom of a shoe without
tearing, cutting, scorching or otherwise damaging
the overlasted portion of the shoe upper to which
a new sole is to be attached.
The modi?cation of the invention embodied
in the hand device referred to is illustrated in
Figs. 3 to 6 inclusive. This device embodies the 35
or steel so that it can be heated to a tempera
features of the invention described above but
ture of from 300° to 400° F. It is secured in ' may be more convenient to use under some con
ditions since it can be carried about from place
the slot 25 by a pair of screws 3!} so that it will
to place and connected to an electric circuit
not move when operating on a shoe. The semi
40 circular periphery of the blade 28 is provided with
projections or teeth 32 (Fig. 2) which are especi
ally constructed to penetrate the opening between
a shoe bottom and its outsole without cutting into
the shoe upper. These projections 32 are illus-'
45 trated more clearly in Fig. 5 in connection with
the hand device to be later described and are des
ignated in that ?gure and in Fig. 4: by the refer
ence numeral 32’. As shown in Fig. 5, the teeth
32’ may be from 1% to % of an inch long on
50 their work engaging edges and are spaced from
each other about the same distance. The teeth
are beveled toward their work engaging edges to
facilitate their introduction between a sole and
shoe bottom but the teeth are not brought to a
55 cutting edge and accordingly are fairly blunt. As
shown in Fig. 4, the teeth 32’ are not o?set, as
are the teeth of a saw but, on the contrary, have
their work engaging edges directly in line with
each other.
60
In using the apparatus the switch 24 is turned
on to cause the heating unit 22 to heat the car
rier member i 5 and blade 28 to the required tem
perature which will thereafter remain substan
tially constant throughout the sole removing op
65 eration. The shoe is presented to the apparatus,
as shown in Fig. 1, and in accordance with the
method herein disclosed the blade 28 is inserted
between the opening or crease at the toe end of
the shoe. The shoe is then rocked from side to
70 side to permit the work engaging edge of the
blade to penetrate into the layer or ?lm of ce
ment between the sole and the shoe upper a sum
cient distance to allow the operator to grasp the
end of the sole. He then pulls the free end of
75 the sole away from the shoe bottom and rolls the
wherever convenient. The hand device comprises 40
a work engaging member or blade 34 illustrated
herein as circular in shape and about two and
one-half inches in diameter and {a of an inch
thick, the blade having formed on its periphery
the work engaging projections or teeth 32' de
scribed above. The blade 34 is rigidly secured
in a heat conducting bearing 35 preferably formed
of brass and having its lower portion slotted
to form legs 38 which bear against the blade.
45
The blade 35 is formed of iron or steel so that
it can be heated to a relatively high tempera
ture and a hole about an inch in diameter is
formed in its central portion for receiving a
brass plug or core M for transmitting heat to
the blade. The blade at! is secured between
the legs 38 of the bearing by a rivet 52 which
passes through the core 50. The forward leg
33 of the bearing 36, as viewed in Fig. 3, has
mounted thereon, by a screw #4, a spring plate
56 preferably of brass and the opposite side por
tions of which are bent inwardly and bear against
the blade 3%, thereby assisting in transmitting
more heat to the operating portion thereof. The
screw 1.14 bears against the upper portion of the
blade and thus holds it rigidly in the bearing 35.
The upper portion of the bearing 36 is cylin
drical and is threaded internally (Fig. 4) to re
ceive the end of a heating unit @8 similar to that
described above and the other end of which is
threaded into a metal collar or bushing 5% pref~ 70
erably of brass or other heat conducting ma
terial and having an upwardly extending hollow
stem 52 through which pass wires 54 to conduct
an electric current for heating the unit. The
bushing 50 is secured in a frame which surrounds 75
3
2,105,427
the heating unit and acts as a guard so that
or hand device of the present invention will be
the device may be handled and operated con
veniently while the unit is hot. This frame com
prises an insulating member 56 to which the
bushing 55 is clamped by a nut 58 threaded on
the hollow stem 52 and bearing against insulat
ing washers 6B. The bushing is also insulated
from the member 56 by similar washers 62 bear
ing against the lower side of that member.
Extending through holes in opposite end por
10
apparent since the danger of permanently dam
aging the shoe upper by cutting, tearing or
scorching is eliminated and these devices per
mit the sole to be quickly removed without the
operator exerting the force which has hereto
fore been necessary to accomplish this result.
Moreover, as pointed out above, the work en
gaging members or blades 28 and 34 of the ap
tions of the member 56 are a pair of metal rods
Kiri having their lower portions spaced from the
heating unit 48 and extending downwardly into
a casting ".55 preferably of aluminum and pro
vided with a tapered central opening in which
the bearing 36 is supported by contacting with
only the lower portion of the casting. The rods
64 are secured in the casting 66 by nuts 68, ‘IE!
threaded on the rods and bearing against in
sulating washers ‘E2. The upper portions of the
' rods 64 are surrounded by a pair of tubes 74
of heat insulating material which rest against
the member 56 and at their upper ends bear
against another- insulating member ‘!6, these
tubes being held rigidly in position by nuts 78
threaded on the upper ends of the rods 64 and
bearing against insulating washers St).
The work engaging blade 36 is thus held rigidly
in the bearing 36 and is provided with means,
30 such as the core 40 and the spring plate 66,
, whereby heat is conducted from the unit 48 to
the work engaging portion of the blade. More
over, the frame formed by the casting 66, the
rods til, and the tubes '14 which, it will be noted,
0.9 CI form a handle for operating the device manually,
insulate the frame from the heating unit and
the blade 34 so that very little heat is lost by
passing into the frame.
In operating on a shoe the blade 34 is pref
40 erably introduced between the sole and shoe at
the toe end thereof and is worked back and forth
laterally of the shoe bottom until the toe end
of the sole has been loosened sufficiently to per
mit the sole to be grasped by the operator. The
operator can then hold the shoe between his
knees or, if more convenient, on a jack on a
bench, and roll the hand tool so that it enters
50
..
a
75
alternatively between the overlasted margins of
the upper and the attached portions of the sole
at opposite sides of the shoe as the sole is pulled
away from the shoe bottom. As stated above,
the action is such that, upon engagement of
the heated blade 3G with the ?lm of cement,
which is stretched into minute strings or threads
by the force exerted by the operator in pulling
the sole away from the shoe bottom, the strings
are immediately severed and the adhesive bond
is broken. Moreover, the construction of the
blunt teeth or projections 32’ is such that the
blade can be advanced continuously and fairly
rapidly between the shoe bottom and the out
sole without danger of cutting or otherwise dam
aging the overlasted portions of the shoe upper.
After separating the forepart of the sole from
the shoe bottom, the operator may remove the
?ller piece, if necessary, and, as shown in Fig. 6,
may separate the shank portion of the shoe by
a continuous rocking motion of the tool, this
motion being altered somewhat at the shank
to avoid interfering with the steel shank piece
located at this portion of the shoe bottom.
The advantages of removing soles which have
been attached to shoes by a strong bonding ce
ment of the type referred to by the method dis
closed herein and with the aid of the apparatus
paratus and hand device respectively are main
tained at a substantially constant high tempera
ture and accordingly either may be used con
10
tinuously in removing soles from shoes, thereby
saving the time that would ordinarily be re
quired to keep these members at the proper tem 15
perature when operating successively on a large
number of shoes.
Having thus described my invention, what I
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters
Patent of the United States is:
20
1. An apparatus for operating upon shoes hav
ing, in combination, a non-movable member
adapted to be inserted between a shoe and a sole
cement attached thereto for separating the sole
from the shoe, said member having relatively
blunt means thereon for penerating the cement
which secures the sole to the shoe bottom, and
means for heating said member to cause said
blunt means to break the cement bond during
penetrating movement of said member in one di 30
rection only.
2. An apparatus for operating upon shoes hav
ing, in combination, a substantially ?at rigid
member adapted to be inserted between a shoe
bottom and a cement attached sole to separate 35
the sole from the shoe bottom, the operating edge
of said member being semi-circular in shape and
having projections thereon arranged to penetrate
the cement by which the sole is attached to the
shoe without cutting into the shoe upper, and 40
means for heating said member to cause said
projections to break the cement bond during the
penetrating action thereof.
’
3. An apparatus for operating upon shoes hav
ing, in combination, a non-reciprocating member 45
adapted to be inserted edgewise between a sole
and a shoe bottom to separate the sole from the
shoe, the operating edge of said member being
serrated for penetrating the means securing the
sole to the shoe bottom, means for heating said 50
member to a temperature that will break said se
curing means without damaging the parts oper
ated upon, and insulating means for maintaining
said temperature substantially constant.
a. An apparatus for operating upon shoes hav 55
ing, in combination, a non-rotatable circular
member adapted to be inserted between a ce
ment-attached sole and its shoe to separate the
sole from the shoe bottom, the operating edge of
said member being shaped to facilitate its intro 60
duction between the sole and the shoe bottom but
being relatively blunt to prevent injury to the
parts operated upon, and means for maintaining
said member at a temperature that will destroy
the cement bond as the member passes between 65
the sole and the shoe bottom without damaging
the shoe upper.
_
5. An apparatus for operating upon shoes hav
ing, in combination, a ?at blade for entering
the crease between a shoe bottom and a cement
attached outsole to separate the outsole from
the shoe, the operating portion of said blade be
ing substantially semi-circular in shape and hav
ing blunt teeth on its periphery for penetrat
ing the cement ?lm between the outsole and 75
2,105,427
the shoe without cutting the shoe upper, and
and the outsole without scarring the shoe up
means for heating said blade to a temperature
that will destroy the cement bond as the teeth
penetrate the latter, said means being constructed
and arranged to maintain the blade at a sub
per, a core in said blade for transmitting heat
stantially uniform temperature.
6. An apparatus for operating upon shoes hav
ing, in combination, a rigid frame, a member on
the frame adapted to be inserted. between a shoe
10 bottom and a sole attached to the shoe by a
strong bonding cement, the operating edge of said
member being convexly curved to facilitate its
introduction between ‘the sole and the shoe bot
tom and having blunt projections thereon adapt
15 ed to penetrate into the cement without scar
ring the shoe upper, means for holding said mem
ber ?xed relatively to the frame, and means for
heating said member to sear the cement as the
member passes between the sole and the shoe
20 bottom and thereby to break the bond which se
cures the sole to the shoe.
7. In an apparatus for operating upon shoes,
the combination of a frame, a toothed mem
ber ?xed on said frame for entering the crease
25 between
shoe and a cement-attached outsole
and separating the shoe parts from each other,
means on the frame contacting with said toothed
member for transmitting heat thereto, and means
for preventing the heat in said member from
30 spreading to adjacent portions of the frame.
8. In an apparatus for operating upon shoes,
thereto, a heat-conducting bearing connected to
said core and passing through said frame, a heat
conducting member fastened to said bearing and Cl
contacting with a portion of the blade remote
from its operating edge, a heating unit secured
in said bearing, said frame surrounding said heat
ing unit, and means on said frame for insulating
it from the heating unit and the blade, thereby
permitting the device to be handled by an oper
ator to separate the outsole from the shoe bot
tom while the blade is hot.
11. An apparatus for operating upon shoes
having, in combination, a rigid member for en
tering the crease between a shoe bottom and a
cement-attached sole and separating the sole
from the shoe, said member having a semi-circu
lar operating portion wide enough to extend
across the cemented margins of the sole and
shoe and the periphery of said portion being
serrated but relatively blunt to penetrate the ce
ment layer between the sole and shoe bottom
without scarring the shoe upper, and means for
maintaining said member at a temperature that 25
will break the adhesive bond between the sole and
shoe and thereby permit the ready removal of
the sole from the shoe without cutting said shoe
parts.
12. That improvement in methods of removing ~
soles from shoes which comprises applying force
the combination of a supporting framera mem
to pull a sole away from its shoe bottom, there
ber ?xed on said frame for entering the crease
by exposing the means securing the sole to the
between a shoe and a cement-attached sole and
35 separating the sole from the shoe bottom, the op
shoe, andbreaking said securing means by the
application of pressure and heat alone without ‘’
erating edge of said member having relatively any cutting or shearing action.
blunt projections thereon for penetrating the ce
ment between the sole and the shoe bottom,
means for heating said member to break the ce
40 ment bond as the teeth penetrate the cement,
said means being constructed and arranged to
maintain the ?xed member at a predetermined
temperature to prevent scorching the shoe parts,
and means for insulating the ?xed member from
the frame to prevent the heat in said member
from passing into the frame.
9. In a device for operating upon shoes, the
combination of a frame, a member on the frame
adapted to be inserted between a shoe bottom
50 and a sole attached to the shoe by cement, the
operating edge of said member being convexly
curved to facilitate its introduction between the
sole and the shoe bottom, means for holding said
member stationary relatively to the frame, and
blunt projections on said operating edge con
structed and arranged to penetrate the’ cement
which secures the sole to the shoe without dam
aging the shoe bottom.
1%. In a device for operating upon shoes, the
60 combination of a supporting frame, a substanti
ally circular blade fastened in the frame and
to enter the crease between a shoe bot
tom and an outsole attached thereto by a strong
13. That improvement in methods of remov
ing- cement attached soles from shoes which com
prises positively pulling a sole away from a shoe
bottom with a force suf?cient to expose the film 40
pressure
of cement
in therebetween,
one direction only
andtoapplying
said film,heat
thereby
breaking the cement bond.
14. That improvement in methods of removing
from shoe bottoms soles which have been attached 45
thereto by a strong bonding cement which may
be rendered non-adhesive by heat which com
prises pulling a sole away from a shoe bottom
sufficiently to stretch the cement layer between
the sole and shoe,»and forcing a single non~re~ '
ciprocating heated blade against the stretched
cement to break the bond of adhesion between the
sole and shoe without any cutting action on the
shoe parts.
15. That improvement in methods of removing
from shoe bottoms soles which have been at
tached thereto by a strong bonding cement of a
permenently elastic consistency which comprises
pulling a sole away from its shoe bottom to
stretch the cement therebetween into a multi
plicity of small strings, and forcing a heated
blade against said strings to sever them by heat
and by pressure exerted in one direction only,
bonding cement and to separate the outsole from , thereby preventing cutting of the shoe parts oper
65 the shoe bottom, the operating edge of said blade
having beveled teeth thereon arranged to pene
trate the cement ?lm between the shoe bottom
ated upon.
CLIFFORD K. MACDONALD.
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