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Патент USA US2105691

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Jan. 18, 1938.
|_, |_, HOUcHlN
2,105,691
LENS GRINDING AND POLISHING MACHINE
Filed April 13, 1936
5 Sheets-Sheet l
INVENTOR.
_.
Lowe/l L. h’ouc/l/?.
Y
‘
)- W
A TTORNEYS.
Jan. 18, 1938.
|_, |__ HoucHlN
2,105,691
LENS GRINDING AND POLISHING MACHINE
Filed April 13, 1956_
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVEN TOR.
M?‘A7TTORNEYS.‘
Jan.‘18, 1938.
1.. L. HOUCHIN
,
2,105,691
LENS GRINDING AND POLISHING MACHINE
Filed'April 13, 1956
i:
I
s Sheets-sheaf. s
,
INVENTOR.
_
Lowe” L. h’ouch/n.
BY
ATTORNEYS. :
Jan- 13, 1938.
|_. L. HOUCHIN
2,105,691
LENS GRINDING AND POLISHING MACHINE
Filed April 13, 1936'
5 Shee1;‘s—Sheet 4
e.
////A
INVENTOR.
.
./_0we// A. Houe?m.
BY
)
A TTORNEYS.
Jan. 18, 1938.
'
'
'
L. L. HOUCHIN
2,105,691
LENS GRINDING AND POLISHING MACHINE
Filed April 15, 1936
5 Sheets-Sheet s
I
INVENTOR. .
./_0W@// L. ?ouc/mv
BY
,
A TTORNEYS. j
Patented Jan. 18, 1938
l
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l *~
_
‘
2,105,691‘
umrsn ‘stern-res PATENT OFFICE
'
"
_
7. 2,195,691
LENS: GRINDING'AND POLISHING MACHINE
Low'ell‘L. Houchin, Columbus, Ohio
>A~pplieationi¥pril7> 13, 1936, Serial No: 74,065
r 4 Claims.
My invention relates-"to a' lens‘ grinding ‘ and
polishing machine. It has todo; more particu
extent and more often than with prior art nia
larly, with a'machine for grinding and ‘polishing
lenses which is provi‘dedwith a lens holder- and
chines and thereby obtain a more‘ accurate sur
a lap- holder-movable relative to each other; means
being provided for‘ simultaneously moving one'oi‘
face on the lens.
Another‘ object of my invention‘ is to‘ provide
the elements both transverselyand longitudinally
relative to the other and additional means being
a machinev of the type indicated which is of ‘a
very simple structure and is therefore inexpensive
to construct and maintain and which is provided
provided for imparting a third-vv movement so--~as
with a minimum number of parts which are sub
ject to wear.
10 to constantly change the path of movement and
the extent of >movement of one element relative
to the other.
There have been a number of machines-of the
general type indicated above devised in’ the past.
Triese‘machines usually embody a lap holder and
a lens holder movable relative to each-other. In
order that the entire surface of the lens will be
Another object of my invention is to provide a
machine of the type indicated provided with
means for bringing about three'moveme‘nt's of
the lens and'lens-g‘rin'ding lap’ relative to each
other, such means being of such‘ a nature that
the three movements are independent of each
other and‘, consequently, such“ movements may
abraded by the lap, means is- provided for moving
be controlled in such a manner‘ that maxi-mum
one-‘of the-elements‘, usually the lens‘; relative to
the other‘ both transversely and longitudinally at
breaking up of the‘ lines of grinding will" be ob
the‘ same time; However, in- order‘ to break- up
In1 its preferred‘form, my invention contem
plates? the provision or a machine embodying a
tained;
I
the lines of abrading and to reduce the chances
of'having inaccuracies in the ?nished lens, a-thi'rd
motion is usually employed. The third‘ motion
is accomplished by having additional meansfor
plurality of laps outside of the housing and on
the forward wall-thereof._ Withiri the housing is
moving the elements relativeitoteach other so; as
disposed a- frame or‘ carriage which is adapted to‘
to change the paths of travel of the movable ele
ments during- successive strokes and3 cycles of
lens-holding members are so arranged that the
movement;
7
Although these» prior art machine's-of the'g'ens
eral type indicated have gone‘intol extensiveu'se,
they are possessed of certain undesirablev features.
Oneof the greatest disadvantages of-ithese prior
art machines resides in» the fact'v-that; they are of
CO Li a complicated structure and, therefore,’ are;: ex-‘
pensive to construct- and‘ maintain; They‘ are
usually provided with. a number' oil parts which
do; not wear for any appreciable length of time».
Another great disadvant'age?of such pior' art ma
4%
(Cl. 51-160)
to break up'the lines of grinding to a greater
chines resides in‘the fact" that they are-so con
structed-that the third motion provided-for break~
ing up the lines of grinding doe‘s'ri'ot break up
the lines sufficiently? or: as’ often as would be de-i
sirable; These prior‘ art- machines" have been
possessed: of other; undesirable features.
One of the‘: objects of myiinventionis to provide
a‘ lens 1 grinding: and polishing" machine which‘. is
provided with a lens hol'der-and- a lapinoider;
means‘v being provided for simultaneously ‘moving
such elements relative to each other in tw'o-v direc
tions-at right angles to each other, and additional
means beingprovided for’i'm'partirig-a thi'r'cl'move;
merit to such elements so as‘ to constantly-‘change
the path of movement and’ the extent;- of movie
11x .21 menti of! one element‘ relativeto“ the other inorder
base or housing‘? having means for mounting‘ a
carry a1 plurality‘ of lens-holding members‘. These
lenses will contact with?the surfaces"v of the" hips
which are disposed on the. forward-wall of'ithe‘
housing. The‘ frame that carries the lens-hold‘
ing members is so constructed that it may be
rocked both longitudinally‘ and transversely so
that the lenses will simultaneously be recipro
c‘ated bo'th‘longitudinally' an'd transversely fel'a- .
tive to'the‘ laps. I providelme'ans‘fbr' rocking the
frame longitudinally and‘ means for rocking it
transversely‘, both of ‘ such means being’. adjustable
to vary the extent of movement of the frame and,
consequently, of the lenses relative to the. laps. ‘1
I'also provide additional means for obtaining a
third movement of the lenses relative to the laps
so as. to break up the lines» of grinding. This
means preferably comprises mechanism for im
parting- an additional- transverse-movement to the 45
frame in"- order to constantly change‘ the‘ extent
of the transverse movement of the lenses rela
tive to the laps. The machine is of- such a type
that the three movements are' independent of '
each-other? and‘ the speed of‘ each‘ movement may
be selected so that maximumbreakin'g' up? of the
lines offgrinclingv will be? accomplished‘. '
The‘ preferred-embodiment of? my invention is
illustrated?
the accompanying drawings where
2
2,105,691
in similar characters of reference designate cor
responding parts and wherein:
Figure 1 is a perspective view of a complete ma
chine made in accordance with the principles of
my invention.
Figure 2 is a perspective view, partly broken
away, showing the operating mechanism of my
machine.
Figure 3 is a transverse section taken through
10 the housing of the machine, certain portions of
the machine being eliminated.
This shaft 9 extends from one bearing support
4 to the other, as indicated best in Figures 2
and 4. On the reduced portion 8 of the shaft 9
adjacent the arm 1 a roller bearing I0 is dis
posed. It will be noted that the shaft 6 is out of
alignment with the portion 8 of shaft 9. Conse
quently, there is provided a pair of co-axially
arranged eccentrics disposed at the opposite ends
of the shaft 9 which I will designate generally
by the reference character II.
p
.
The frame for supporting the lens-carrying
‘ '
Figure 4 is a schematic ?gure of the machine,
with the housing removed, illustrating the rela
tive arrangement of the various operating parts
members is adapted to be mounted on the shaft 9
in ,such a manner that the eccentrics II will
cause transverse movement thereof. This frame
of the machine.
embodies a horizontally disposed lower portion 15
Figure 5 is a section taken substantially along 12 comprising transversely extending members i3
line 5-5 of Figure 4.
which are joined together by longitudinally ex
Figure 6 is a section taken substantially along ' tending members l4 and [5 which are integrally
line 6—6 of Figure 4.
I >
connected thereto. Substantially midway be
20
Figure 7 is a diagrammatic illustration of the
tween the forward and rear ends of each of the
machine, showing the various movements and
illustrating diagrammatically how the movements
are brought about.
transverse members I3 a bearing housing I6 is
Figure 8 is a side elevation of a certain portion
25
of the machine, illustrating mainly the two trans—
verse movements of the frame of the machine
and the means for bringing about such move
ments.
.
Figure 9 is a section taken substantially along
line 9—-9 of Figure 8.
‘
Figure 10 is a view partly in perspective and
partly in section illustrating the means which I
have provided for clamping the lap in position.
Figure 11 is a perspective view of a lap which
35 I preferably use on my machine.
Figure 12 is a diagram illustrating the path
of movement of a point on the lens relative to
the lens-grinding lap.
These bearing housings l6 rotatably.
receive the roller bearings ID of the eccentrics
II. It will be apparent that if the eccentrics H
are rotatedtthe lower portion l2 of the frame
will be moved rearwardly and forwardly and also
vertically. In other words, it will move through
a rotary path in a vertical plane.
At each end of the lower portion l2 of the
frame is an upstanding portion IT. This por 30
tion I‘! of the frame is bifurcated at its lower
end and straddles the transverse member l3 of
the lower portion l2 of the frame. Each leg of
the bifurcated lower end'of the upstanding por
tion I‘! of the frame is pivotally connected to
the end of member l3 as at Ila. Each of the
members I‘! is thus so mounted on the lower por
tion [2 of the frame that it may be oscillated
Figure 13 is a similar View illustrating the path
40 of movement of a point on the lens relative to
longitudinally of the frame and of the machine.
I provide means for connecting the upper ends 4a
the lens-grinding lap after the machine has been
of the upstanding portions I1 so that they both
adjusted to obtain a greater transverse movement
than that illustrated in Figure 9.
With reference to the drawings and particu
simultaneously oscillate in the same direction.
45 larly to Figures 1 to 4, inclusive, my machine is
shown as comprising a housing I which is pref
erably of substantially box-like form and is
preferably made of metal. This housing pref
erably has a hinged door 2 at its top which is
50 provided so that the operating mechanism of the
machine may be reached for adjustment and
other purposes.
Lens carrier
55
formed.
In the machine illustrated, I provide means
for carrying two lenses although it will be ap
parent that the machine may be modi?ed to
carry a single lens or any number of lenses.
I
will ?rst describe the means which I provide for
60 carrying the lenses in order that they may be
moved in two directions substantially at right
angles to each other relative to the lens-grinding
laps.
'
On the upper surface of the bottom of the
65 housing I a bearing supporting member 3 is
bolted. This bearing supporting member 3 has
an upstanding bearing support 4 formed integral
therewith at each end thereof. In each of the
upstanding bearing supports 4 (Figure 9) a ball
70 bearing 5 is disposed. A stub shaft 6 extends
centrally through this ball bearing -5. On its
inner end within the bearing support 4, the stub
shaft 6 has an integral radially extending arm
1; > This arm ‘I has the outer reduced end 8 of a
75 longitudinally extending shaft 9 keyed therein.
This means comprises a longitudinally extending
member l8 which extends from one of the mem
bers II to the other. Adjacent each end of the
member l8, it is provided with an upstanding
portion l9. This upstanding portion 19 is dis
posed between the vertically extending arms of
member I‘! and is pivotally connected thereto
as at 20. Thus, each end of member I8 is piv
otally connected to one of the members IT.
The member l8 adjacent each end is pro
vided with bearing housings 2| which are spaced
laterally from the upstanding portion l9 which is
disposed therebetween. These bearing housings
have ball bearings disposed therein which re- '
ceive stub shafts extending from a yoke 22.
Thus, the yoke 22 is free to rock in one direction
on the member l8. An arm 23 having a pair of
spaced depending portions 24 at its rear end is
pivotally connected to the yoke 22 as at 25. Thus,
the arm 23 may rock on the yoke 22 in a direc
tion-substantially at right angles to the rocking
movement of the yoke 22 on the member l8. The
arm 23 extends through an- opening 26 in the
forward wall of the housing. Thus, the arm 23 is
free to rock both longitudinally and transversely
of the. machine on the frame which carries it.
Also, the frame which carries it is free to rock
both transversely and longitudinally of the ma
chine.v As previously stated, the rockable frame
carries two of the arms 23, as indicated in the
drawings, so, that two lens holders may be pro
vided on- the machine.
The portion of each arm 23 that extends out
3
2,105,691
of the housing I is provided with a lens block
carrying member 21. This member 27 may be
of- any suitable type but preferably embodies a
member having a pair of depending pins 28 that
project into sockets formed in the upper surface
of a block 29 to which is cemented or otherwise
secured a lens L. The pins 28 will permit re
ciprocation of the lens over the surface of the
lap in both directions but will prevent rotation
10 of the lens relative to the lap. Consequently, this
30 and the clamping means serves to position it
properly transversely of the table.
I provide means for effectively lubricating the
screws 4!! in order to prevent binding thereof.
It will be apparent that the moisture from the
abrasive, which is usually in the form of a paste,
would tend to rust the screws 4|].
However, I
the pivotal connections of the arms 23 to the
This lubricating means comprises a reservoir
43 mounted on the member 31 intermediate the
two lap tables 30. This member 43 has a cap
44 on its upper end which may be opened to per
mit ?lling with a lubricant. The lower end of
The lap holder
The means for holding the lap L’ is indicated
20 best in Figures 1, 3 and 10. As indicated in these
?gures, I provide means on the forward wall of
the housing I for supporting a pair of lens-grind
ing laps L’. These laps are so disposed that the
lenses‘ carried by the arms 23 will be disposed
v25 directly thereabove.
The two lap-supporting
tables 30 are carried by a single support 3| which
is bolted to the forward wall of the housing I.
The tables 30 project forwardly from the member
3|. The upper surface of each of the tables 30
30 is? substantially ?at but has a depression 32
formed therein in order to produce an upstand
ing lug 33. The lug 33 projects above the sur
face of the table upon which the lap L’ will rest
, as indicated best in Figure 3. The lower surface
35 of the lap is provided with a notch 34 (Figure 11) .
This notch is just slightly wider than the di
ameter of the lug 33 so that when the lug pro
jects thereinto, the notch and lug will cooperate
to prevent longitudinal movement of the lap
relative to the machine. However, because the
notch is elongated, as indicated, transverse move
ment of the lap on the table will be permitted.
I provide means for clamping the lap in po
sition in order to prevent the transverse move
ment. This means comprises a lug 35 with a
straight forward edge arranged so that the rear
edge of the lap will contact therewith and a
clamping member 36 adapted to contact with the
forward edge of the lap so that it will be ?rmly
gripped between the clamping member 36 and
the lug 35. The clamping member 36 is pivoted
at its lower end as at 31 between a pairof lugs
38 on the lower and forward portion of the table
30. The upper end of the clamping member 36
i has a rearwardly projecting ?nger 39 adapted to
73
and the cooperating lug 33 serve to initially prop
erly position the lap longitudinally of the table
provide means for effectively lubricating the
screws and thus eliminate any possibility of their
rusting and binding.
order to eliminate friction and wear,
70
The notch 34
will insure that the curvature of the lap will
be imparted to the‘surface of the lens.
‘At all the pivot points of the frame and at all
15 frame I preferably provide roller bearings in
60
between ?nger 39 and lug 35.
engage the forward edge of the lap L’ as indi
cated in Figure 3. A screw 40 passes through
the clamping member 33 intermediate its ends
and is threaded into a bushing 4| disposed in an
opening in the lap table 30. The screw is free
the reservoir 43 is open and communicates with
a vertical passageway 45 which in turn com- -
municates with a horizontally extending passage
way 45. The passageway 46 extends from the
bore in which one of the screws 40 is disposed to
the bore where the other screw is disposed. Thus.
the lubricant is fed to the rear end of each of
the screws 43. It will be noted that the screws
are downwardly and forwardly inclined. Con
sequently, the lubricant will ?ow downwardly and
forwardly along the entire length of the screws.
Thus, the screws will be lubricated throughout 0
their length.
The depressions 32 in the lap tables will tend
to collect any moisture which might seep beneath
the laps and, therefore, will prevent sticking of
the laps on the lap tables due to rust. The bot
tom of the housing l extends forwardly to form
a shelf la which will catch any abrasive that
falls off the laps.
Means for maintaining the lap and lens in contact 40
The means for maintaining the lap and the
lens ?rmly but resiliently in contact with each
other is indicated best in Figures 1 and 3. As
illustrated, the forward portion of each arm 23
is downwardly turned as at 4'! and then has a 45
forwardly extending portion 48. This portion 48
is at a level substantially corresponding with the
level where the lens L and the lap L’ contact with
each other. This portion 48 has a cup 49 in its
upper surface which receives a point 50 formed
on the lower end of a rod 5|. The rod 5| extends
upwardly and has its upper end slidably mounted
in a sleeve or collar 52 on the outer end'of an arm‘
53. A compression spring 54 surrounds the rod
5! and the upper end of this spring abuts the 55
portion 52 of arm 53 while the lower end of the
spring bears against an enlargement 55 on the
lower end of the rod. Thus, it will be apparent
that the spring 54 will function to force the for
ward end of the arm 23, that carries the lens. 60
to rotate in the opening in the member 36
downwardly so that the lens will be in ?rm con
through which it extends. The outer end of the
screw is enlarged to form a handle portion 42,
the inner end of which engages the clamping
member 36.
It will be apparent that in using this clamping
device, the lap L’ is placed on the table with the
notch 34 over the lug 33. Since the notch is of
substantially the same width as the diameter of
lug 33, longitudinal movement of the lap on the
table will be precluded. The handle 42 of the
screw may be turned until the ?nger 39 touches
the forward edge of the lap L’ and forces the
tact with the lap.
lap transversely of the table into ?rm contact
with the lug 35. The lap will be tightly gripped
The arm 53 has a sleeve 56 on its rear end
which loosely ?ts on an upstanding rod 51. A
setscrew 58 is provided so that the arm may be 65
adjusted vertically on the rod 5? and held in
adjusted position. The lower end of the rod 51
is mounted in a member 59 which has a bifur
cated lower end 53 which straddles a pair of lugs
32, projecting upwardly from the housing I, to 70
which it is pivotally connected by a pin 63. The
member 53 has a slot 64 formed therein in which
‘the rear end of an arm 65 is disposed. This arm
65 is pivotally connected to member 59 by a pin
66. The slot 54 is of such size as to permit lim 76
4
2,105,691
ited movement of member 65 about pivot pin 66.
The member 65 has a latch portion 61 adapted
to cooperate with a keeper 68 immovably dis
posed between the lugs 62. The keeper has a lug
69 formed thereon.
The forward end of arm
65 has a portion 19 formed thereon through
which passes the upper end of a strap ‘II. The
strap ‘H is adjustably held in portion 10 by
means of a set screw 12. The lower end of this
10 strap 1| is connected to the forward end of arm
23 as at 13. The extreme forward end of arm 53
has a handle portion 14 formed thereon.
When the machine is not, in use, as indicated
in Figure 1, the arm 53 and rod 51 and associated
parts are swung about the pivot pin 63 to cause
the rod 51 to swing rearwardly and the forward
end of arm 53 to swing upwardly. The latch
portion 61 of arm 65 during such movement will
drop behind the lug 69. Thus, the latch will
function to keep the various parts in the posi
tion illustrated in Figure 1. During the de
scribed movement of arm 53 and rod 51, the for
ward end of arm 65 is also swung upwardly.
Because of the strap ‘H, this will lift the forward
end of arm 23 upwardly so that the lens L will
be lifted out of contact with the lap L’. The
lens may then be removed from the machine.
To adjust these parts again "into operative
position, it is merely necessary to move the arm
65 upwardly slightly to release portion 61 thereof
from the lug 69. ‘This will permit the rod 51
to swing forwardly and the arms 53 and 65 to
swing downwardly. The arm 23 will also swing
downwardly. The spring 54 will force the arm
23 downwardly so that the lens will be in firm
contact with the lens-grinding lap. With the
parts in this position, the latch portion 6‘! will
be in front of the lug 69. Thus, these portions
will normally tend to prevent upward swinging
40 movement of arms 53 and 65.
In other words,
‘Iprovide means for locking the various parts in
inoperative position as indicated in Figure 1 or
in operative position indicated in Figure 3. The
.force of the spring 54 may be varied by adjust
' This member 8| has a pin 82, eccentrically dis
posed thereon which carries a ball bearing 8|a
to which the end of the pitman ‘i5 is pivotally
connected by means of a collar 15a on the pit
man which surrounds the bearing. The disk 80
has a groove 83 on its periphery. Three mem
bers 84 project through the flange 82 of member
8| into the groove 83 in member 80. One of these
members is an adjustable setscrew.
The shaft 19 and the pin 82 are out of align
ment with each other. Consequently, when the
shaft 19 is rotated, the frame will be rocked 10n
gitudinally of the machine by means of the ec
centric 18 and the pitman ‘E5. The extent of the
longitudinal movement may be varied by adjust 15
ing members 80 and 3| relative to each other.
To do this the setscrew 84 is loosened and then
the member 8| is'rotated relative to the member
8!}. This will vary the position of the shaft 19
and pin 82 relative to each other. Consequently,
this will vary the lengthwise movement of the
pitman 75.
The pin 82and shaft 19 are so ar
ranged that they may be brought into alignment
if desired. It will be apparent that if they are
in alignment, there will be no lengthwise move
ment of pitman ‘l5 and, consequently, no longi
tudinal rocking movement of the frame.
Transverse movement
As previously stated, the frame which carries
the arms 23, that carry the lenses, is free to
rock transversely of the machine and such rock
ing movement will cause transverse movement
of the lenses relative to the laps. The means for
accomplishing this transverse movement is indi
cated best in Figures 4, 6 and ,8.
This means comprises a rocker arm 85 which
is rigidly connected as 'at 86 to the member l5 of
the lower portion l2 of the frame. This rocker
arm 85 has its rear end pivotally connected as 40
at Bl to the lower end of a pitman 88. This pit
man 88 has its upper end pivotally connected
by means of a ball bearing 88a (Figure 6) to a
pivot bolt 89 which has its head 89a disposed in
ment of the arm 53 vertically on the rod 51.
a T_-slot 90 extending across a disk 9| at the
The fact that the point of application of the
downward force by means of rod 5| and spring
54 is substantially at the level of the point of
contact of the lens and the lap makes it possible
50 to grind strong plus lenses on the machine. A
downward pull will be exerted on the lens rather
than downward thrust and this will make it
center thereof. The bolt 89 may be adjusted to
different positions along the T-slot 90 so that it
will be located in different positions relative to
possible to grind stronger plus lenses without
danger of error.
Longitudinal movement
_ As previously stated, the frame which carries
the arms 23, that carry the lenses, is free to rock
longitudinally of the machine and such rocking
60 movement will cause longitudinal movement of
the lenses relative to the laps. The means for
accomplishing this longitudinal movement is in
dicated best in Figures 2, 4 and 5. This means
comprises a pitman 15 which has one end con
65 nected by a ball bearing pivotal connection. to a
depending bearing housing 16, on member l8 of
the frame, as at 11. The opposite end of the
pitman ‘I5 is connected by means of an eccentric
18 to the forward end of a shaft 19. The eccen
70 tric 18 (Figure 5) comprises a disk 85 disposed
eccentrically on the forward end of shaft 19 and
formed integrally therewith. A disk~like mem
ber 8| is mounted on the member 85 and is free
to rotate thereon being provided with a periph
eral ?ange 8|b that surrounds the member 80.
the center of the disk 9|. To facilitate descrip
tion of the operation, I will designate this entire 50
eccentric structure by the reference character 92.
The disk 9| is mounted concentrically on the end
of a shaft 93 to which it is keyed.
It will be apparent that the shaft 93 and the
disk 9| are rotated and if the pivot bolt 89 is dis 55
posed eccentrically on disk 9|, the rear end of
the rocker arm 35 will be swung upwardly and
downwardly. This will cause swinging of the
frame about the eccentrics ||. Consequently,
due to this transverse rocking movement of the 60
frame, the lenses will be caused to move trans
versely relative to the laps. The extent of the
transverse movement will depend upon the po
sition of the pivot bolt 89 relative to the center of
the disk 9! and this may be varied whenever 65
desired.
Third movement
The means for accomplishing the third move
ment of the frame and, consequently, of the lenses
relative to the laps has been previously described.
This means comprises the eccentrics H which
cause the frame to move in a rotary path trans
versely of the machine.
The longitudinal move
ment, the transverse movement, and the third
movement. which also might be said to be a"
5
2,1,05,691
transverse movement, all occur simultaneously,
as; will be brought out. more‘ in detail herein
after. The third movement accomplished by
means of the eccentrics II will, constantly vary
P the extent of the transversev movement produced
by theeccentric 92. This is due to the fact that
as the. eccentric 92: causes the frame to rock about
the eccentrics I I, the eccentrics .I I also rotate and
cause the entire frame to move bodily forwardly
:10 and rearwardly. Thus, the extent of transverse
movement produced by the eccentric 9,2 is con
stantly varied.
The driving means
15
The driving means is illustrated best in Fig
ures 2, 3 and 4. For driving the various.‘ parts
of the machine adapted to be driven, I provide an
electric, motor 94. This motor 94 is supported
within the housing adjacent the rear wall there
20 of. The motor 94 may be controlled by means
Cl (.1
reciprocation of the pitman ‘I5. This will in .turn .19
cause longitudinal rocking movement of the
frame which carries the arms 23. Consequently,
the lenses on the forward ends of these arms will
be reciprocated longitudinally of the laps. Dur
ing this reciprocation, the arms 23 may pivot 1:5
about, pivot points 25 and, consequently, the
surface of the lenses will always be in ?rm con
tact with the surface of the laps. Furthermore,
the arms 23 will be free to swing in a vertical
plane about the pivot points 2 I. This will permit
pulley 99 are of substantially the same size so
moved transversely of the laps. During this
transverse rocking of the frame, the arms 23 will
pivot about the pivot points 21 and the entire
frame will pivot about the eccentrics I I.
Thus, it will be apparent that the lenses are
moved relative to the laps simultaneously in two
wheel 91a keyed thereon. This hand wheel
59
lug 6,9 and will prevent accidental upward swing- .
ing of arms 53 and 95. The motor 94 may then
be started by means of the switch lever 95. This
will cause the driving mechanism to function.
The eccentric ‘I8 will be driven and will cause
the spring 54 to always hold the lenses in ?rm
contact with the laps.
At the same time the eccentric ‘I8 is driven, the
eccentric 92 is also driven. This causes rocking
of the rocker arm 85 and thereby produces trans 25
trics II rotate together because they are con
nected by means of the shaft 9. The outer end
of the drive shaft 9‘! projects through an opening
35 in the side wall of the housing and has a hand
A LI
with the laps. The latch 67 will be in front of
of a switch operated by a lever .95 which extends
through a slot 96 in the sidewall of the housing.
The motor 94 is provided with a drive shaft 97.
This shaft has a pulley 9.8 keyed on its outer
end. The pulley 98 drives a pulley 99, keyed on
the outer end of one of the stub shafts B, by
means of a belt I00. The pulley 98 and the
that the two eccentrics II will be driven at sub
.stantiallythe same speed as the drive shaft of the
motor. It. will be apparent that both of the eccen
ux.
position, the lens blocks 29 being placed beneath
pins 28, where the spring 54 will exert a down
ward force, forcing the lenses ?rmly into contact
910.; is provided so that the drive shaft 9‘! may
be rotated manually when the motor 94 is not
running. This may be desirable to properly ad
just the. machine before operation thereof is
started.
The drive shaft 91 has a second pulley IIJI
keyed thereon which is smaller than the pulley
98. This pulley IIJI drives a larger pulley I02
by means of a belt I03. The pulley I02 is keyed
on the end of shaft 93 which drives the eccentric
92 provided for obtaining the transverse move
ment. It will be apparent that the eccentrics II
Will be driven faster than the eccentric 92. Con
sequently, the transverse movement accomplished
by means of eccentric 92 will be slower than the
third motion accomplished with the eccentrics I I.
This results in the path of movement of the lens
transversely of the lap, produced by eccentric 92,
being changed several times, by means of eccen
trics II, during a single movement of the lens
transversely of the lap from one edge thereof to
the other. This insures that the lines of grind
ing will be broken up often and to a sufficient
60 extent.
The drive shaft 91 of the motor also projects
from the opposite side thereof. It drives a gear
reduction unit I04. This gear reduction unit I94
is connected to the shaft ‘I9 that drives the eccen
65 tric ‘I8 which produces the longitudinal move
ment. The gear reduction unit is provided so
that shaft ‘I9 will be driven at a slower rate than
the drive shaft.
Thus, the longitudinal move
ment will also be at a slower rate than the third
70 movement produced by the eccentrics I I.
The operation
In operation of the machine, the laps L’ are
?rst mounted on the lap tables in the manner de
75 scribed. The arms 23 are lowered into operative
verse rocking movement of the frame which car
ries the arms 23. Consequently, the lenses are
directions substantially at right angles to each
other.
However, simultaneously with such move
ments in both directions a third movement is pro
duced by means of the eccentrics II which are
driven comparatively fast. These eccentrics
produce a back-and-forth and up-and-down, in
other words, a rotary, movement of the frame. 40
During this movement the arms 23 will pivot
about the points 2|. This causes a constant
change in the path of movement since it varies
the extent of the transverse movement produced
by means of the eccentric 92. Since the eccen 45
trics II are rotated at a greater rate of speed
than the eccentric 92, the path of movement of
the lenses transversely of the laps will be changed
several times during a single movement of the
lenses transversely of the laps from one edge 50
thereof tov the other. This will insure that the
lines of grinding will be broken up sufficiently
to overcome any chance of error.
The extent of the longitudinal movement may
be varied by adjusting the eccentric ‘I8 in the 55
manner previously described. The extent of the
transverse movement may be adjusted by ad
justing the eccentric 92. In Figure 12 I illus
trate the path of movement of a point on the
lens relative to the lap, produced when the lens 60
is mounted on my machine and the machine is
operated. Figure 13 is a similar view illustrating
the path of movement when the pivot bolt 89 of
the eccentric 92 is adjusted farther away from
the-center in order to obtain a greater trans 65
verse movement.
One of the important features of my invention
is that the three motions described are inde
pendent of each other. Thus, the speed of each
movement may be different from the speed of 70
the others.
It will be apparent from the above description
that I have provided a machine having many de
sirable features. The machine is very simple yet
very effective for the purposes for which it is in 75
6
2,105,691
tended. Any of the pivot points or hearing points
which might be subject to wear are provided with
ball bearings. The machine is so constructed
that the third movement provided therein is of
such a nature that the lines of grinding are
broken up to a greater extent and more often
than with prior art machines.
'Many other advantages will be apparent from
the description and drawings and the following
10 claims.
Having thus described my invention, what I
claim is:
.
1. A lens grinding and polishing machine com
prising a lap holder and a lens holder, a frame
15 for carrying one of said holders, said frame be
ally to vary the extent of the transverse move
ment, and means for bodily moving the frame
transversely automatically during the transverse
movement produced by said second named means
in order to- vary the extent of movement pro
duced by said second named means, said last
named means comprising an eccentric which sup
ports said frame and about which the frame
rocks transversely.
3. A lens grinding and polishing machine com 10
prising a. plurality of lap holders and a plurality
of lens holders, means for supporting a plurality
of the said holders of one type for movement rel
ative to a corresponding number of holders of the
other type, said means comprising a frame rock
ing rockable both longitudinally and transversely
able both longitudinally and transversely of the
of the'machine so as to produce a longitudinal
machine so as to produce a longitudinal and
transverse movement of the lens holders and
and transverse movement of the lens holder and
lap holder relative to each other, means for rock
20 ing the frame longitudinally of the machine,
means for rocking the frame transversely of the
machine, and means for bodily moving the frame
lap holders relative to each other, means for
rocking the frame longitudinally of the machine, 20
means for rocking the frame transversely of the
machine, and means for bodily moving the frame
in one of said directions to vary the movement of
in one direction to vary the movement of the
the lap and lens relative to each other, said last
holders relative to each other, said last-named
25 named means comprising an eccentric upon
which the frame is supported and about which
the frame rocks in the direction which it is moved
by said eccentric.
'
2. A lens grinding and polishing machine com
30 prising a lap holder and a lens holder, a frame
for carrying one of said holders, said frame be
ing rookable both longitudinally and transverse
ly of the machine so as to produce a longitudinal
and transverse movement of the lens holder and
35 lap holder relative to each other, means for rock
ing the frame longitudinally of the machine, said
means being manually adjustable to vary the ex‘
means comprising a plurality of co-axially ar- -
ranged eccentrics upon which the frame is sup
ported and about which the frame rocks in the
direction which it is moved by said eccentrics.
4. In a lens grinding and polishing machine a
lap support, said lap support comprising a table 130
upon which the lap is adapted to rest, said table
having a projection adapted to contact with one
edge of the lap, a clamping member adapted to
contact with the opposite’edge of the lap, means
for adjusting said, clamping member comprising Pl
a screw threaded into the lap suppoit, said
screw being disposed in inclined‘ relation, and
tent of the longitudinal movement, means for
means for supplying lubricant to said screw at
rocking the frame transversely of the machine,
the higher end thereof.
LOWELL L. HOUCHIN.
40 said last-named means being adjustable manu
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