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Патент USA US2105720

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Jan. 18, 1938.
w. B. COOPER
FLOOR COVERING
Filed Jan. 26, .1937
4
2
‘
2,105,720
Patented Jan. 18, 1938
2,105,720
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,105,720
noon COVERING
' Wellesley
Cooper, Amsterdam, N. 'Y., assignor
to Bigelow-Sanford Carpet (30., Inc., Thomp
sonville, Conn, a corporation of Massachu
setts
Application January 28, 1937, Serial No. 122.45%
10 Claims. (Cl. 139-391)
This invention relates to pile floor coverings same weight and mix but may have more plies
and particularly to an improvement in the con
struction of fabrics of that type, wherein the
areas normally subjected to greatest wear are
made more highly resistant to wear.
In use, certain areas of ?oor coverings are
commonly subjected to more wear than other
portions. Thus the borders of the rug or car
peting are usually subjected to more wear than
10 the body portions. Where imitation broadloom
carpeting is made fro‘in assembled strips of nar
row carpeting, the seam produces a ridge which
usually wears away more rapidly than the re
_ mainder of the carpet.‘
I”
'
It is the primary object of the present inven
tion to increase the life of rugs and carpets and
I have found that this may be accomplished at
comparatively small cost by increasing the sturdi
ness of the rug at the borders, seams, or other
20 portions which are subjected to the greatest
wear. In the preferred embodiment of my in
vention I attain this object by providing a more
durable pile in those portions such as by em
ploying a more serviceable yarn or by increasing
25 the count of pile tufts in those portions. How
ever, as will appear, an increase in the strength
or thickness of the warps and wefts of the back
ing fabric is also effective for my purpose.
These and further objects and advantages of
30 my invention will appear from a more .detailed
description thereof in connection with the ac
companying drawing in which:—
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred em
bodiment of my invention, shown as incorporated
15 ‘UK into an Axminster rug;
Fig. 2 is a detail sectional view showing my in
vention as embodied in the seamed portions of
assembled carpet strips, and
Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a modi?ed form
40 of my invention ‘as embodied in an Axminster rug.
In Fig. II have illustrated an Axminster rug
I of any suitable weave, having a body portion
2, an end border portion 3 and a side or selvage
border portion 4. The pile 5 of the main body
4-5 portion 2 is composed of yarn of any suitable
grade. weight, twist, etc. for a rug of the desired
speci?cations. The border portions 3 and 4 are
composed of pile tufts l0 and in accordance with
my preferred embodiment, the yarn from which
50 the tufts I0 is made possesses greater wear re
Isisting qualities than the yarn employed in the
tufts 5. Thus, for example, the border tuft yarn
may be a heavier yarn or it may have a different
is blend of wool conducive to greater resistance to
5 abrasion. On the other hand, it may be of the
or a greater twist.
In weaving a rug of the Axminster type, the
change in pile yarn from that used in the body
portion 2 to that used in the border sections 3 5
and 4 can readily be accomplished when the tube
frame spools are being wound. Thus for the
selvage border portions 4, yarn of the special
characteristics above noted is wound on the ends
of the spools and threaded through the end 10
tubes in the tube frames.
To weave the end
border portions 3, the entire tube will be threaded
with yarn of those characteristics.
In rugs of the Wilton type, the insertion of
the special pile yards in the end and side border 15
sections can also be readily accomplished; Thus
for the selvage border portions, the desired qual
ity of yarn is carried as pile warp through the
end interdental reed spaces, and to provide the
end border sections 3, the stronger pile warp may
be carried on a separate beam and raised out of
the backing fabric by suitable jacquard mech
anism.
As a modi?cation of my invention I may em
ploy the same yarn for the tufts l0 as is used for 25
the tufts 5 and effect an increase in resistance
to abrasion in the side and end' borders by em
ploying a greater number of pile tufts per unit
of area in those portions than in the body por
tion. By decreasing the fabric take-up at the. 30
breast beam, the rows of pile in the end border
sections 3 can readily be increased. Additional
rows may be inserted in the side border portions
4 by suitably constructing andvspacing the tuft
inserting or raising mechanism depending upon 35
the type of loom employed.
}
Of course, a still further increase in wearing '
qualities can be effected by combining an in
crease in pile tuft count with an enhancement
in yarn grade as above described.
40
As a further modi?cation the present inven
tion contemplates that the enhanced wearing
characteristics may be obtained by employing
heavier warp and/or weft yarns or threads in the
marginal portions of the backing fabric than in 45
the body portion thereof. Such a construction is
shown in Fig. 3 wherein the tuft pile yarns 30 in
the end and side border portions may or may not
be of the same general weight or character as
those in the main body portion 3!.
50
In the construction of Fig. 3 the end border
section 33 is constituted of weft yarns 34 which
are of heavier and preferably thicker character
than the weft yarns 35 which extend through
the body portion of the rug and likewise the warp 55
2,105,780
yarns 38 along the side border 31 of the rug are
border areas outside said body portion, said
of heavier and preferably thicker character than k border areas being provided with yarns that are
the warp yarns 38 which go to make up the body
heavier than the corresponding yarns of said
portion of the rug.
body portion so that the tread surface of said '
border areas is more highly resistant to' abrasive. 5
s
The effect is that the heavier warp and/or
weft yarns of the ' marginal portions will im
part to the border sections increased wearing
qualities, partly by more closely compacting the
pile tufts at those portions and thereby making
10 them more highly resistant to wear.
In Fig. 2 I have illustrated a portion oi’ carpet
ing constructed of assembled strips 20 and 2i
secured together in any suitable manner such as
by an adhesive tape or by stitching as indicated
15 at 23. In manufacturing strips of carpeting so
to be assembled, the pile tufts 22 and 23 at and
adjacent the abutting edges are so constructed
as to resist wear better than the tufts 20 and 2|
of the remainder of the rug strips and such con
20 struction may be in accordance with any of the
above described embodiments of my invention.
The rug when sewn together by the stitching 23,
and/or taping if desired, will be more resistant
to wear at the seam portions than the common
seamed rug having pile which is uniform
wear tending to shorten the pile than the tread
surface of said body portion, whereby to enhance
the wearing qualities of said border areas.
. (i. As an article of manufacture, a ‘pile fabric
floor covering comprising a backing fabric of
warp and weft yarns and pile tuft yarns inter
woven therewith to form an uninterrupted pile
tread surfacecomposed of a body portion and
border areas outside said body portion, said
border areas being ‘provided with pile tufts that
are stronger than the pile. tufts in said body por
tion so that the border areas are more highly
resistant to abrasive wear tending to shorten
the pile than the body portion, whereby to en
hance the wearing quality of said border areas. 20
5. As an article of manufacture, a pile fabric
?oor covering comprising a backingfabric of
warp and weft yarns and pile tuft yarns inter
woven therewith to form an uninterrupted pile
tread surface composed of a body portion, and 25
throughout, with the result that the relatively 'border areas outside said body portion, said
greater amount’of abrasion to which the seams border areas being provided with pile tufts that
are usually subjected will be withstood. and the are heavier than the pile tufts in said body por
tion so that the border areas are more highly
entire rug will wear uniformly.
30
As a further modification of my invention, it resistant to abrasive wearttending to shorten the 30
may in some instances be desirable to affect a
gradual transition from the lighter pile of the
body portion to. the heavier pile of the border
sections. This may readily be accomplished by
85 threading the tube frames of Axminster looms
or the reeds of Wilton looms‘ with yarn which
is graded in weight to .become progressively
heavier as the borders are approached. .
This application is a continuation in part of
40 my prior application, Serial No. 743,996, filed
September 14, 1934.
I claim:—
a
1. As an‘ article of manufacture, a pile fabric
floor covering comprising a backing fabric of
45 warp and weft yarns and pile tuft yarns inter
woven therewith to form an uninterrupted pile
tread surface, certain areas of which surface are
normally exposed to more wear than other areas,
said- ?rst-mentioned areas being provided with
50 heavier yarns than said other areas so that the
tread surface of said ?rst-mentioned areas is
more highly resistant to abrasive wear tending
to shorten the pile, than the tread surface of said
other areas, whereby to enhance the wearing
55 qualities of said areas exposed to greatest wear.
2. As an article of manufacture, an imitation
broadloom floor covering constructed of a plu
rality of strips of pile fabric each comprising a
,backing. fabric of warp and weft yarns and pile
60 tuft yarns interwoven therewith, said strips be
ing seamed together at their abutting edges to
form an uninterrupted pile tread surface of sub
stantial area, the areas in said surface extend
ing immediately adjacent said seams being pro
65 vided with heavier pile than the areas of said
pile tread surface relatively: remote from said
pile than the body portion, and with the pile
intermediate said body portion and said border
areas gradually increasing in weight from the
body portion to the border areas.
6. As an article of manufacture, a pile fabric 35
floor covering having body and side and end
border sections all of which are provided with a
pile tread surface formed of tuft pile yarns inter
woven with a backing fabric of warp and weft
yarns, the warp yarns of the side border sections 40
being‘of heavier character than the warp yarns
__ of the body portion of the rug and the weft yarns
of .the and border sections being of heavier or
larger character than the weft yarns in the body
portion. so that the fabric constituting the inter 45
section of the side and end border sections will
have an increased thickness.
7. As an article of manufacture, a pile fabric
?oor covering having body and side and end
border sections all of which are provided with a
pile tread surface formed of tuft pile yarns inter
woven with a backing fabric of warp and weft
yarns, the yarns ‘of the side border sections be
ing~of heavier character than the yarns of the
body portion of the rug and the yarns of the 55
end border sections being heavier or larger in
character than the yarns of the body portion so
that both the side and end sections of the rug will
be provided with a backing of increased or
heavier yarn structure where the side and end
sections meet.
.
.
8. As an article of manufacture, a floor cover
ing having a body portion and side and end border
sections, both constituted as pile tufts interwoven
with a backing fabric of warp and weft yarns, the
yarns of the border sections of said backing fabric
being thicker than the corresponding yams of
seams so that the areas of the tread surface ad
jacent said seams are more; highly resistant to 'the body portion thereof. thereby providing a
abrasive wear tending. to shorten the pile than more tightly binding support for the border pile
70 said remote areas thereof.
tufts to hold the said border tufts more ?rmly 7
3. As an article of manufacture, a pile fabric erect than the body portion pile tufts, whereby
floor covering comprising a backing fabric of to render the border tufts more resistant to wear
than the body pile tufts.
warp and weft yarns and pile? tuft yarns inter
»woven therewith to form an. uninterrupted pile
9. As an article of manufacture, a ?oor cover
76 tread surface composedv of‘ a. body portion and
ing comprising tuft pile yarns, warp yarns and ‘I
2,106,720
weft yarns, the warp yarns in the side body‘ of
the fabric being larger than the warp yarns in
the body of the fabric, and the weft yarns in the
end portion of the fabric being larger than the
weft yarns in the body of the fabric, and binder
warp yarns for binding the weft yarns in place.
10. As an article of manufacture, a pile fabric
floor covering comprising a backing fabric of
warp and-weft yarns and pile tuft yarns inter
10 woven therewith to form an uninterrupted pile
tread surface composed of a body portion and
border areas outside said body portion, said
3
border areas being provided with pile tufts that
are composed of heavier yarn than the yarn com
posing the pile tufts in said body portion so that
the tread surface of the border areas is more
highly resistant to abrasive wear tending to
shorten the pile than the tread surface of said
body portion, whereby to enhance the wearing
quality of said border areas without producing
any appreciable difference in texture feel or ap
pearance between the border areas and the body 10
portion.
WELLESLEY B. COOPER.
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