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Патент USA US2105815

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Jan.‘ is, 1938.
E. F. MAAs
SHIP FENDER
Originé‘l Filed Jan. 8, 1934
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2,105,815
Patented Jan. 18, 1938
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2,105,815
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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2105.815
SHIP FENDER.
Elov F. Maas, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, assignor to
Wingfoot Corporation, Wilmington, Dell, a cor
poration of Delaware
Originial application January 8, 1934, Serial ‘No.
705,749. Divided and this application October
17, 1936, Serial No. 106,205
9 Claims. (Cl. 114-219)
The present invention relates to an improve
ment in marine fenders and it has particular ref
erence to such fenders which are used for pro
tecting the sides’ of a ship from injury in the
5 event of contact or collision with other marine
structures, such as piers, break-waters, canal
locks and the like. They may be used on piers,
break-Waters, etc., or on the ship itself.
This application is a division of my applica
10 tion 705,749 ?led Jan. 8, 1934, for Marine fender;
Prior to this invention, several types of marine fenders have been proposed, but they have
Fig. 4 is an end‘ elevation of the device shown
in Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is an enlarged longitudinal cross sec
tional view through the device shown in Figs. 3
and 4 taken substantially along the line 5-—5 of
Fig. 4 showing the means for attaching the sup
porting means to the fender proper; and
Fig. '6' shows somewhat the action which takes
place when the» marine fender is compressed be- tween a ship and a pier or the like when the ship
is docking or is thrown toward the pier by the
waves.
I
been objectionable for several reasons. Most of
It will be noted from an inspection, particue
them have been too rigid and unyielding to give
l'arly of Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 7', that the tubular body
15 the necessary cushioning effects, and some have
been too costly because of complicated structure
and di?iculty in applying. The present invention, however, overcomes the objectionable features of the prior art and provides a fender of
20 extreme simplicity in construction and one which
l5 of ?exible material, such as rubber, has a rela- 15
tively large inner diameter so that the same may
be compressed appreciably and give a resilient
action which prevents the fender from being
pounded to pieces, as would an ordinary solid
member.
‘
may be easily installed or applied.
An important object of the invention is to provide a marine fender which will be formed of
In Figs. 1 and 2 this. tubular member, of which
there may be one or more provided on any given
structure, ‘is shown as being provided with ta
cushioning material, preferablyresilientlrubber,
pered plugs 29', which may also be formed of
25 and so arranged as to be ?exible throughout at
least the major portion of its length.
Another object is to provide a marine fender
which will be not only formed of yieldable material, but which will be yieldably supported so‘ as
30 to be capable of complete bodily movement when
necessary.
Another object is to provide such a fender
which will be capable of movement both horizontally and vertically, and this without likeli35 hood of the cushioning material being torn away
from its supporting means.
An important object of‘ this invention is to pro- ‘
vide supporting means on a fender which is se-
curely locked in place with respect thereto, the
40 supporting means being adapted to be secured
either to the ship or to the pier, break-water or
the like by a suitable fastening means.
The foregoing and other objects, features and
advantages of the invention will be readily appre45 ciated from the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein
several forms of the invention have been shown
by way of illustration, and wherein:
'
Fig. l is an elevational view of a marine tender
50 embodying my invention;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal cross-sectional view of one end of the marine fender
shown in Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 shows a modi?ed means for supporting
55 the marine fender;
20
rubber and provided with longitudinal bores 30 25
for the passage of‘ the ?exible supporting cable
l6; A substantially cylindrical metal bushing 3|
is anchored in the outer end of each of the ta
pered plugs 29, said bushing-being centrally bored
in alignment with the bore 30 to accommodate '30.
the cable Hi. In this construction the cushion
ing properties of the rubber are augmented by
the air which is con?ned within the tubular
member [5 so that this particular form of fen
der is in fact of the pneumatic type. Yet it is 35
suspended in such a way as to be bodily movable
along the cable and to be rotatable thereabout,
so that when a ship is at a pier with the fender
between the ship and the pier or the like the ,
fender may rotate about a substantially horizon- 40
tal axis as the ship rises and falls with the swells,
and. may also slide longitudinally along the cable
in the event that the ship moves in‘ that direc
tion or during the time when the ship is docking.
In some installations it might not be desirable 45
to employ the longitudinally extending support
ing member within the rubber cushioning tube,
and in that event a structure as shown in Figs.
3 to’? inclusive may be employed. Here the cush
ioning tube 15ers provided in one of its side walls 50
with a plurality of relatively spaced anchoring
plugs 33 having their Outer Surfaces Corrugated
or otherwise roughened and molded in place,
whereby to be well bonded. Each of these an
choring plugs 33 is formed with a dove-tail socket 55
2
2,105,815
34 into which the lower end of a suspension cable
tions, a plurality of anchor plugs embedded at
20 may be inserted.
intervals in one side wall of said tubular member
The lower end of the sus
pension cable is ?ared or enlarged (see Fig. 6),
as at 35, and the space between the ?ared end
of the cable and the socket is thereafter ?lled
with molten lead 36 or the like for the purpose
of holding the parts in assembled relation.
' I
In Fig. '7 the fender I5 is shown arranged be
but not extending through said space to the oppo
site wall, and means secured to each of said an
chor plugs for suspending said tubular member
from a pier or the like.
_‘ 1.3;.‘Alrharine' ‘fender comprising an elongated
tubular member of resilient material having an
tween a ship 31 and a pier 38 with the suspension
internal air space therein of substantial propor
10 cables 20 therefor connected to the pier at their ' itions, a plurality of metallic plugs molded at in
ends by means of a staple 40 embedded in con; .. tervals into one side wall of said tubular member
crete.
Obviously, any other form of fastening
means may be used for this purpose: As the ship
moves toward the pier, as'in Fig.v 7, the tubular
15 member I5 is compressed and substantially en
tirely ?attened out so that, there is no opening,
but not extending through said space to the oppo
site wall, and'means ‘secured to each of said an
chor plugs for suspending said tubular member
15
from a pier or "the like.
4. A .marine fender. comprising an elongated
interiorly thereof, although ordinarily therubber 7tubular member of resilient material having an
in the fender is suf?ciently thick so that the "internal air space therein of substantial propor
fender is not completely ?attened out but retains
20 some of its original shape.
In the event that a‘
structure such as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 is em
ployed, the compression of the rubber fender is
not as complete as that illustrated in Fig. 7, due
to the solid portions provided at the end of the
25 fender. The advantage of the constructions
shown in Figs. 1 and 2, however, is that,since
tions,,a plurality of metallic anchor plugs vulcan
ized at' intervals in one side wall of said tubular 20
member but, not extending through said space to
the opposite wall,v and means secured to each of
said anchor plugs for suspending said tubular
member from a pier or the like.
5. A marine-fender comprising an elongated 25
tubular member of rubber having an internal air
there is very little air that can escape through the
space therein of substantial proportions, a plu
bore 30 if the fender is sufficiently. compressed,
rality of metallic anchor plugs having ribbed rub
ber contacting surfaces molded at intervals in one
side wall of vsaid tubular member but not extend
ing through said space to the opposite wall, and
means secured to each of said anchor plugs for
the air within the fender is con?ned and acts ‘as
an additional cushioning means for resisting the
flattening of the fender itself. -
I
-
-
From the foregoing it will be understood that
a novel marine fender has been providedwhich
will be capable of absorbing shocks incident‘ to
35 the contacting of a pier by a ship and thus :pro
tecting the sides of the ship frominjury. .. The
construction is extremely simple and capable of
being produced at relatively low cost as wellas
being capable of ‘easy installation. The fenders
40 need not necessarily be employed upon a ?xed
suspending saidtubular member from a pier or
the like. ..
v
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.
6. A marine fender comprising an elongated 35
tubular member of resilient material having an
internal air space therein of substantialpropor
tions, a plurality of metallic anchor plugs molded
at intervals in one side wall of said tubular mem
ber but not extending through said space to the 40
opposite wall, said anchor plugs each having a
marine structure, but may be used to equal ad
vantage when suspended at the side of a ship, and _ socket therein, and means secured in said sockets
in this respect the term “marine structure’?has for'suspending the same from a pier or the like.
been employed in the speci?cation and claims in
7. A marine fender comprising an elongated
tubular ,memberof resilient material having an
45 its broad signi?canceto include either a ?xed
internal air space therein, and a plurality of
structure such as a pier or the like, or a movable
metallic anchor plugs molded'at intervals in one
structure such as a ship- or equivalent. Further
side wall of said tubular member, said anchor
more, the fenders are not limited to use in a
plugs each having a socket therein provided with
horizontal position, but may be suspended verti
undercut walls, and means interlocked with said
50 cally or otherwise as desired. Obviously the in
vention may be modi?ed in respect to ‘details sockets for securing the same to a pier or the like.
8. A marine fender comprising an elongated
other than those speci?cally illustrated and de—
scribed, and the right is herein reserved to make tubularv member of resilient material having an
such changes as fall within the scope of the internal air space therein, and a plurality of
metallic anchor plugs molded at intervals in one
55 appended claims without departing ‘from the
spirit of the invention.
.
._
,
- side wall of said tubular member, said anchor
Having thus fully described my invention, what plugs each having a dovetail socket provided
I claim and desire to secure by vLetters'Patent of therein, and a plurality of cables each having a
frayed end ?xed in, one of said sockets by a solidi
the United States is:
,
l
..
1. A marine fender comprising an elongated ?ed low melting point metal, for securing the
60
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g
tubular member of resilient material having an same to. a pier or the like.
9. A marine fender comprising an elongated
internal air space therein of substantialpropor
tubular member of resilient material having in
tions, and a plurality of suspension means an
chored at intervals in one side wall of said tubular ternal air space therein, of a plurality of anchor
65 member but not extending through said space to ing means molded in one side wall of said tubular
the opposite wall for securing the same to a pier element and suspension means associated with
said plurality of means for suspending the tubu
or the like.
_
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2. A marine fender comprising an- elongated lar element from a pier or the like.
tubular member of resilient material having an
ELOV F. MAAS.
70 internal air space therein of substantial propor
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50
55
60
65
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