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Патент USA US2105980

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Jan. .18, 1938.
J. MARGULIEAS YETIYAL
2,105,980
SWEAT BAND FOR HATS
Filed Dec. 6, 1955
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
HINVENTOYRS -
JOHN‘ MARGULIES
DAVID H. YOUNG
BY THEIR ATTORNEYS
Janrls, 1938.
'
.
»
'
J. MARGULIES ET‘AL
.
SWEAT
BAND
F‘OR
‘
2,105,980
HATS
Filed Dec. 6, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
T515
35
A
/j
/1|/
lllll
INVENTORS
JOHN MARGULIES
DAVID H. YOUNG
BY THEIR ATTORNEYS -
2,105,980
Patented Jan. 18, 1938
UNITED STATES
PATENT
CE
2,105,980
SWEAT BAND FOR HATS
John Margulies, Yonkers, N. Y., and David H.
Young, East Orange, N. J.; said Young as
signor to said Margulies
Application December 6, 1935, Serial No. 53,232
8 Claims. (01. 2-181)
This invention relates to sweatbands for hats,
and more particularly to extensible sweatbands.
It is desirable that a hat be capable of adjusting
itself to heads of different sizes, and one of the
5 objects of the invention is to provide an improved
form of extensible sweatband to give a hat of ad
justable size and at the same time to produce a
sweatband which will present a smooth surface
to the head and be comfortable to wear. It is
10 characteristic of hats made in accordance with
this invention ‘that the two ends of the sweat
band are placed. in overlapping relationship in
such manner that an even, smooth surface is
presented to the head of the wearer at all times,
15
in spite of the overlapping.
Referring now to the drawings,
Fig. 1 is an inverted plan view of the head
opening of a hat containing the novel extensible
sweatband;
20
Fig. 2 is a vertical section through the shortest
dimension of the hat of Fig. l on the line 2-2
of Fig. 1, showing the faces of the overlapping
ends of the sweatband;
Figs. 3 to '7 inclusive are sections through the
sweatband showing the various stages of assem
bling the sweatband and its mounting in the hat;
Fig. 3 showing the leather skived and notched;
Fig. 4 showing the novel braided fabric which
joins the sweatband proper to the felt; Fig. 5
showing the sweatband proper with the narrow
fabric turned up; Fig. 6 showing the narrow
fabric attached to the felt; and Fig. 7 showing the
parts completely united;
Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic showing of the manner
,, in which the sweatband moves circumferentially
when the wearer’s head enlarges the sweatband;
Fig. 9 is a view in elevation of the overlapping
ends of the sweatband shown in Figs. 1 and 2 on
a full scale;
Fig. 10 is an elevation corresponding to Fig. 9,
40
taken from the back of the sweatband;
Fig. 11 is a corresponding elevation of the
construction shown in Fig. 9, showing the sweat
bandv ends in their expanded relation;
Fig. 12 shows the two ends of the sweatband
disassembled;
Fig. 13 is a vertical section through the over
lapping ends of the sweatband taken on the line
I3—l3 of Fig. 9 where the tongue of one end
overlies the other end;
Fig. 14 is a similar section through the two
ends of the sweatband taken on the line Iii-l4
of .Fig. 9 where the full width of the overlying
end .covers the full width of the underlying end;
for5
while
Fig. 15 is a horizontal section through the over
lapping ends of the sweatband, showing the man
ner in which the ends overlap and the method of
attaching the sweatband to the braid.
‘
_
The hat'has the usual felt crown 3!,and brim 5
32 with the usual ribbon 33 outside the crown.
'
In general the sweatband 3d of the hat‘occupies
its usual position, and it may be made of leather
or any other suitable material, and where in the
claims we speak of “a leather” it should be under
stood as including any other material of which
the sweatband proper may be made, e. g._, woven
fabric, etc. In addition‘ to this sweatband proper
313, the sweatband includes certain other ele
ments.
,
15
.
It is desirable that the sweatband should pre
sent to the wearer’s head a surface which‘ is
smooth and even—without creases in it. For this
purpose it is desirable that at the two ends of
the sweatband at the back of the head, the sweat
band should in the main present a surface com
posed wholly of the sweatband proper. Hereto
fore when the ends of a leather or fabric sweat
band have been overlapped, the variations in
thickness of the parts have produced unevenness 25
and ridges which make the hat uncomfortable.
According to this invention, objectionable ridges
are done away with. Wherever the parts or ends
overlap so as to produce a multiple thickness, the
leather or fabric is skived, depressed, stamped, or 30
otherwise thinned out in such manner that the
-
parts ?t together with approximately the thick
ness of a single layer of the leather or fabric of
the sweatband proper.
Referring to Fig. 12 of
the drawings, the underlying end of the sweat- 35
band proper is designated by the reference char
:
acter 35, and the overlying end by the reference
numeral 36. This terminology should be read
as the parts appear when looking inside the hat,
as it appears in Fig. 2. In the embodiment shown
in‘ Figs. 1 to 15, the overlying end 36 has a tongue
31 which is located midway of the top and bot
tom of the sweatband and its width is equal to
about half the height of the sweatband. This
tongue can be tapered. When the parts are in 45
their unexpanded position, they appear as shown
for instance in Fig. 9. The square end 38 of the
underlying .end of the sweatband is located a
short distance beyond the base of the tongue 31
of the overlying end. The portion of the under
lying end 35 which is covered when the sweatband *
is unexpanded is indicated in Fig. 12 by ?ne ver
tical lines. This entire portion should be thinned
out, compressed or otherwise made of less thick
ness than the remainder of the sweatband.
In
'
2
2,105,980
addition it is preferable also to thin the tongue
band, where they are brought together and tied
3'! and so much of the overlying end 36 as lies on
top of the underlying end 35 when the parts are
in their unexpanded position. It will be noted
that the tongue 31 has been reduced in thick
as shown in Fig. 10. In addition, by using this
arrangement of tying with the elastic passing
through these slots 43 in both ends of the sweat
band, the strength .of the straight length 39 of
ness to approximately half its original thickness,
and similarly that portion of the end 35 which
elastic is supplemented by these tying loops in
its work of holding the ends of the sweatband
underlies the end 36 of the sweatband has been
thinned out, so that the total thickness through
10 the sweatband at the tongue 31 is approximately
the same as the normal thickness of the leather.
Similarly in Fig. 14, the entire width of both the
overlying and underlying. ends 33 and 35 of the
sweatband have been thinned out so that the
15 thickness of the band is approximately the same
as the normal thickness of the rest of the sweat
band.
To make a hat having a sweatband extensible
for what corresponds to the complete range of
20 one person’s hat size, it is necessary that the
sweatband be extensible only a fraction of an
inch. Thus, Figs. 9 to 15 of the drawings be
ing on full scale, it will be noted from Fig. 11 that
it is a rather small fraction of an inch which
25 the sweatband has to expand to give the varia
tions within one hat size. For the purpose of
fastening these sweatband ends together resil
iently, the novel means which will now be de
scribed has been devised.
We have discovered that the most practical
30
form of elastic connection between the two ends
is a narrow covered elastic, such as shown on the
surface of the upper end 36. We have discovered
that in order to get the amount of stretch re
35 quired, it is necessary to have a rather long length
of the elastic, and it is partly for this purpose
that we have provided the tongue 37 on an end
of the sweatband proper. This long straight
length of elastic is designated by the number
39. In order that this length of elastic 33 may
not press agaimt the wearer’s head and form a
ridge, the face of the tongue 3'! and the overlap
ping end 36 of the sweatband proper are recessed
at 40 (see Fig. 12). At each end of the recess
is a hole 4| passing through the leather or fabric
45
of the sweatband, and in the case of the hole 4|
in the tongue 37 there is a corresponding hole 42
through the end 35 of the sweatband. When the
two ends are in unextended or normal position,
the hole 42 is in register with the hole M in the
50
tongue 31. Two ends of the length 39 of the
elastic pass through these end holes and are held
thereby. With this arrangement the elastic has
a longer stretch than usual. In order that the
length 39 of elastic may remain in its groove, we
55
tie it in place at points intermediate its ends. In
the embodiment shown in Figs. 1 to 15, two tying
points are provided. For the purpose of making
these ties, slots 43 are provided at two points
60 intermediate the ends of the length 39. The
amount of overlap of the two ends 35, 36 is such
that these two intermediate points at which the
tying loops are to be placed occur where the two
ends overlap and therefore slots 43, registering
65 with each other, are found in both the end 35 and
the end 36. These slots are located adjacent the
depression or recess 40 in which lies the length
39 of elastic. The ends of the elastic coming
through the hole 4i and hole 42 to the rear of
70 the sweatband are brought to the slots 43 on one
75
side of the recess 40 and to the front of the
sweatband through these slots. The ends are
then laid over the length 33 of elastic and pass
back through the two slots 43 on the other
side of the groove 48 to the rear of the sweat
together. The dimensions of the parts are such
that the maximum extension of the sweatband
is obtained without extending the straight length 10
39 to its full extent. In this way the life of the
elastic is prolonged, and it does not tend to
become slack. We have discovered that the
thinned out or depressed ends of the sweatband
are not quite as strong as is sometimes desirable,
and we have therefore strengthened these ends.
This is done by treating the overlapping ends
with a stiffening preparation such as cement,
shellac or any other stiffener or sizing material.
In the drawings the entire overlapped or thin
portion 45 of the underlying end 35 is thus
stiffened, as indicated by vertical lines in Fig. 12.
This stiffening cement is preferably placed on the
face of the underlying end. On the overlying
end 35 of the sweatband proper the cement is 25
placed on the under side, covering the tongue 3'!
and the entire end 38 back as far as the dotted
line 46. In the drawings the tying ends of the
elastic on the back of the sweatband are not
placed in recesses, although this can be done if 30
desired, similarly to the recess 40 on the front.
It is found that the stiffening coatings given the
overlapping ends of the sweatband prevent any
undesirable ridges or creases being formed by
anything in back of the overlapped ends. It will
be observed that in the structure just described
the tensioning is provided by the straight length
39 of elastic on the face of the sweatband and by
the tying loops ‘ill which lie in the slots 43 be
tween the two ends of the sweatband. It will be
observed that the holes 43 are slightly wider than
the elastic which constitutes the tying loops 44.
The manner of mounting the sweatband 34
in the hat will now be described.
In order that
the hat may be adjustable for any size of head, 45
it is obviously advantageous that the sweatband
proper may stretch with relation to the crown
3i and brim 32 throughout the entire circum
ference of the hat. For this purpose an elastic
medium is introduced between the sweatband 50
proper and the felt of the hat. For this purpose.
we prefer to employ an elastic cushion braid.
This braid may consist of longitudinal elastic
yarns and material braided thereon. The ma
terial can be made of lastex, if desired. It is 1on
gitudinally extensible and resilient and also is
resilient to creasing on a longitudinal line. This
material extends completely around the hat, as
can be seen in Fig. 1, although if desired it can
be placed in the hat with the adjacent ends dis
connected from each other at the point where
the ends 35, 36 of the sweatband proper or leather
overlie each other. As shown in Fig. 7, one lon
gitudinal edge of this braid or elastic material is
stitched to the felt, preferably at the juncture of
the brim 32 and the crown 3|.
The other longitudinal edge of the cushion
braid 4'! can be attached to the lower edge of the
sweatband proper in any desired manner.
In
Figs. 3 to 7 is shown one method of doing this. 70
Beginning with Fig. 3, it will be observed that
the lower end of the sweatband proper is skived
until it has a tapered surface 50, and a longi
tudinal groove M is cut therein midway the edges
of the bevelled surface. The edge of the braid
75
3
2,105,980
elastic 41 is then ?xed or otherwise attached to
the bevelled surface 50 between the groove 5|
and the lower edge of the material, as shown in
Fig. 4. The bevelled surface 50 is then folded on
itself with the groove 5| forming the crease, as
lapped portions at a plurality of points to con
nect said ends, and the portion of said elastic
shown in Fig. 5, and the opposite edge of the
wearer.
means lying on the face of the sweatband being
in a groove in order that said sweatband may
present a smooth surface to the head of the
braid is then stitched to the felt, as shown in
4. A sweatband of adjustable length compris
Fig. 6. As the ?nal stage, the contacting parts
ing a leather having overlapped ends, a yielding
means joining said ends by passing through both
of the surface 50 are cemented or otherwise fas
10 tened together, as shown in Fig. 7. In this way
said overlapped ends at a plurality of points.
5. A sweatband of adjustable size for a hat,
a hidden stitching is obtained between the sweat
comprising a leather having overlapped ends, the
band proper 34 and the braid or elastic 41.
The method of mounting the sweatband just overlapped portions being thinned, in combina
described gives a peculiarly efficient cushion. As tion with means resiliently holding said ends in
overlapped relation, said means comprising an
already mentioned, the elastic braid 4'! is resil
elastic portion lying longitudinally of the sweat
ient and therefore will provide a cushioning ef
band on the face thereof in a recess, and loo-ps
fect. In addition, the lower edge of the sweat
band 34, by virtue of the small opening formed intermediate the ends of said longitudinal por
by the groove 5|, has resiliency itsef as it lies in tions tying same at said intermediate points.
6. A sweatband for a hat, comprising a leather
contact with the wearer’s head. If the sweatband
34 is pressed outwardly to a considerable extent, having overlapped ends and elastic means with
a longitudinal portion passing through said over
the braid 41 as well as the lower edge of the
sweatband 34 will contact with the wearer’s head. lapped ends and adapted to hold them in over
In this way when the extension of the band is lapped relation, the ends of said longitudinal por
considerable, there are two folds contacting the tion of the elastic being secured together after
passing through the overlapped ends to hold them
wearer’s head and distributing the pressure be
. together resiliently at a point intermediate the
tween them.
It will be observed that by using this extensible, ends of the longitudinal portion.
7. A sweatband for a hat, comprising a leather
resilient, elastic braid, it is possible for the sweat
band to move circumferentially and to enlarge having overlapped ends and elastic means with
where the ends 35, 36 overlap. As shown in Fig. 8, a longitudinal portion passing through said over
lapped ends and adapted to hold them in over
this reduction in the overlap moves the sweat
band from the solid line position, the solid and lapped relation, the ends of said longitudinal por
tion of the elastic being secured together after
dotted arrows indicating the amount of circum
passing through the overlapped ends and around
35 ferential movement at the various points chosen.
the longitudinal portion to hold said overlapped
What we claim is:
1. A sweatband for a hat, comprising a leather ends together resiliently at a point intermediate
the ends of the longitudinal portion.
having overlapped ends and elastic means pass
8. A sweatband for a hat, comprising a leather
ing through said overlapped ends at a plurality of
having overlapped ends and elastic means having
points
to
hold
them
together
resiliently.
40
2. A sweatband of adjustable size for a hat, a portion extending longitudinally of the leather
comprising a leather having overlapped ends and longer than the overlap of the ends and holding
them in overlapping relation, in combination with
elastic means connecting said ends at their over
lapped portion, the elastic means lying on the end portions of the elastic'means holding the ion
gitudinal portion of the elastic and the two ends
face of the sweatband in a recess so as to present
45
an even, uniform surface to the head of the of the leather together resiliently at a plurality
wearer.
10
15
30
35
40
45
of points intermediate the ends of the longitu
'
3. A sweatband of adjustable size for a hat,
comprising a leather having overlapped ends, the
overlapped portions being thinned, in combina
tion with elastic means passing through the over
as
dinal portion, said end portions being themselves
secured together.
JOHN MARGULIES.
DAVID H. YOUNG.
50
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