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Патент USA US2106066

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Jan. 18, 15938.
' w. H. SADGROVE
2,106,066
CHAIR, SETTEE, OR LIKE FURNITURE
Filed Sept. 22, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
Invuzfon
W H Sadyrore ,
a,
4%
A?! arneyn
Jan. 18, 1938.
w. H. SADGROVE
'
2,106,066
CHAIR, SBTTBE, OR LIKE FURNITURE
Filed Sept. 22, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
v‘ 2,106,066 .
Patented Jan. 18, 1938v -
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,108,086
CHAIR, SETTEE, 0B LIKE FURNITURE
William Howard Sadgrove, Weybridge, England
Application September 22, 1936, Serial No. 101,991
In Great Britain January 30, 1935
10 Claims. (Cl.- 155-50)
This invention is for improvements in or relat
ing to chairs (more especially easy chairs), settees
or‘ the like which are either permanently uphol
stered or are constructed for use with loose cush
5 ions upon the seat, with or without also against
the back, and which are provided with a resil
iently suspended seat.
as to extend forwardly and upwardly towards the
free end, whereby the front of the seat is caused
to travel along the said path of increasing radius.
It is found that a seat resiliently suspended in
‘the manner characteristic of this invention as 5
outlined above,,will retain its original resilient
supporting power and also its initial position in
the chair or settee practically inde?nitely. This
is due partly to the fact that the leaf springs or
the like, in contrast to the ordinary hour glass type 10
of spring, ?ex through only a relatively small
angle, even with the maximum movement of the
front edge of the seat, and in consequence are'
It will be understood that by a chair, setteeor
the like is meant an article of furniture of this
description, in which, in contrast, for example.
to a bed or- couch, there is a seat which in the
normal use of the article of furniture is occupied
by a person in a sittingv position with the legs ' enabled to retain their original resilience or
' overhanging the edge of the seat and the feet strength for a very long period of time, and partly 1°
’ supported on the ?oor.,
to the fact that if the leaf springs or the like
The object of the invention is to provide an
improved construction of such chair, settce or
the like characterized by an improved form of
resilient suspension for the seat, which, in addi
tion to cheapening and facilitating manufacture,
should eventually weaken a little, their sagging
or “sitting down’Pin consequence is prevented
by the ‘pull upon their free ends of the elastically
and also affording increased comfort in the use
of the chair or the like, as compared with known
constructions, will be capable of remaining in its
initial degree of resilience and effectiveness prac
nitely on account of the fact that the linear ex
tension of the foundation is only slight, even again
, tically inde?nitely, that is to say against the tend
extensible foundation for the upholstery or loose 20
cushions, which pull keeps constant almost inde?
with the ‘maximum downward movement of the
seat.
1
25
In addition, a highly satisfactory springing
ency, so frequently experienced'with known con- ,
effect is obtained in cases where the upholstery or
structions, for the suspension to lose its resilience loose cushions of the seat is or are composed of
with consequent loss of support for the seat and ' sponge rubber or of a mass of closely spaced com
its load and mi'splacement moreover, of the nor
pression springs, either plain or in pockets; by 30
mal (unloaded) position of the seat from its orig
suitably selecting the resilience of V the sponge
30
inal, designed position.
‘
,
.
According to the invention, there is provided
a chair, settee or the like upholstered or con
structed for use with loose cushions, wherein the
'
4
combination eiiect is obtainable in the springing 35
of the seat.
dation anchored at one end to the front edge of
the seat and at the other end to the frame of
tion, in the event of the supporting members
taking the form of leaf springs, the leaf springs
rear edge of the seat, and the said front edge is
displaceable downwardly, under the weight of a
person sitting upon the seat, along a path of
increasing radius from the line of rear anchor
age of the foundation, partly against the result
ant pull of the foundation and partly against the _
upward thrust of one or more leaf spring or
like laterally sti? resilient cantilever support~
ing members for the seat extending in the direc
tion of depth thereof from back to front with the
free end at the front and connected at said free
50
end to the front edge of the seat.
‘
According to a preferred form of the inven
tion, there are two leaf spring or like support
ing members disposed one on either side of the’
. seat and so disposed in the chair or settee frame
mM
on the one hand and the strength of the leaf
springs or the like on the other, a most pleasing
seatdncorporates for the support of the uphol-'
stery or cushions an elastically ‘extensible foun
the chair or the like along a line at or near the
40
rubber, or the strength of the compression springs,
If desired, according to a feature of the inven
may be twisted through substantially a right an- 40
gle so that one end is substantially in the plane
of oscillation of the spring, that is with the dis
placement referred to above of the front edge
of the seat, while the other is substantially in a
plane perpendicular thereto.
45
This is found to be a convenient arrangement
in certain cases where, for instance, the design
or width dimensions of the chair or settee frame ' ‘
render it difficult to provide a horizontally dis
posed surface su?iciently wide to accommodate 50
the‘width of the spring at one or other of the
ends thereof. Also, in the case where the ver
tically disposed end of the spring, that is to say
the end which is in the plane of oscillation of
the spring. is the ?xed end, there is the further 55 ~
' 2,106,006
advantage’ that the ?xing screws or the like by
which the ‘spring is secured to the chair or settee
frame do not tend to become pulled out in course
of time by the upwardreaction pressure of the
fixed end of the spring, for this pressure is applied
‘ radially of the shanks of the screws, in contrast
to axially thereof and therefore upon the under
loose cushions, which again may be either of the
spring cushion, type or of the type composed
wholly or in part of hair, ?bre or the like or
‘ sponge rubber.
.
The front edge of the seat of the chair is formed
by a cross-member I‘! mounted at the ends upon
the free ends of a pair of leaf springs l8, disposed
side of the screw heads as is the case where the
one along each side of the chain, ‘These leaf
fixed end of the spring is horizontal
springs are affixed to the rear part of the bottom
I and extend towards their free end forwardly 10
for example substantially continuous from end to and upwardly therefrom. The springs I8 con
end of the spring, or acute and located at some _' stitute a resilient mounting for the seat, in virtue
The twist in the spring may either be gradual,
'10
particular point along the length of the spring.
If acute, the twist must, as will be appreciated, be
15 near the vertically disposed end of the spring so
as to preserve vthe resilience or proper leaf spring
action of the spring.
being removed.
.
The invention will now be further described
with reference to the accompanying drawings
20 which illustrate several embodiments by way of
example.
.
‘ In these drawings,
Figure 1 shows in- perspective an easy chair con
' structed in accordance with the invention, with
_
25 certain parts broken away;
Figure 2 is a similar view showing another con
struction;
of which the seat is free to move in the down
ward direction under. the weight of the person
sitting upon it and then to return to normal posi-'
tion, by the lift of the springs, upon said weight
‘
Figures 3, 4, 5, and 6 are fragmentary views
showing alternative forms of suspension member
The upholstery or loose cushions of the seat is
or are supported upon an elastically extensible
foundation,similar in principle to the foundation 20
above described for the upholstery or cushions
oi’ the back. As shown, this foundation comprises
a number of slats IQ of inextensible material
rigidly af?xed at their forward end to the cross
member I ‘I and connected at their rear end to one 25
or more short tension springs 20, in turn an
chored to the cross bar 6 of the chair frame along
a line in the vicinity of the rear edge of the seat.
From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that
in accordance with the fundamental idea under 30
Figure 7 shows in perspective a small chair con-_ lying this invention, the front edge of the seat is
structed in accordance with the invention, ~with displaceable downwardly, under the weight of -a
person sitting upon the seat, partly against the
certain parts broken away, and
Figure 8 illustrates a constructional modi?caé -. pull of the elastically extensible foundation for
the upholstery or loose‘ cushions of the seat and 35
35 tion hereinafter described.
Like reference characters indicate like parts in partly against the upward thrust of the leaf
springs, while when the weight is removed from
the various ?gures.
Referring first to Figure l, the chair here shown the seat the said foundation exercises an upward
pull upon the ends of the leaf springs through the
comprises a rigid frame of substantially conven
intermediary of thecross-memb‘er H.
40
40 tional form and construction. This frame con
The upholstery of the seat is similar vto that
sists of a rectangular bottom I adapted to rest
upon the ground, two rear posts 2, 3, two arms of the back and, as in the case of the back, may
4, 5 connected to the posts 2, 3 at the rearand be replaced by loose cushions if desired.
Referring next to Figure 2, the method of
a cross bar 6 extending across the chair at the
spring mounting the seat is the same as that of
back
at
about
the
level
of
the
seat
and
connected
45
the chair of Figure 1 and the construction of the‘ at the ends to the posts 2, 3.
Carried upon this rigid frame is a back ‘I, which chair is generally the same. The principal differ
ence is in the form of the back, which, as shown,
in the embodiment of the invention shown con
sists of two side members 8, 9 rigidly af?xed to the‘ comprises simply a rigid frame 2| combinedwith
posts 2,3 of the chair frame; twoleaf springs ill, elastically extensible webs 22 disposed vertically,
ll mounted at the lower end upon the face of "instead of horizontally as in the construction of
curved brackets l2, l3 attached in turn to the Figure 1, and anchored at the bottom to the webs
lower part of the side members 8, 9, which leaf of the seat foundation at a point thereon near
.
springs extend upwardly as shown to the top of the rear end of the webs.
Figure
3
shows
a
modi?ed
form
of
the
55
the
back
and
have
a
freedom
of
resilient
move
65 ment towards and away therefrom; and a number tion, according to which the leaf springs. inven
I8 are
of horizontally disposed elastically extensible of semi-elliptical form, being disposed with the'
webs ll connected at the ends to the face of the major axis of the ellipse horizontal and with the
springs in, II and- each consisting of two slats vforward extremity of the lower limb secured to'_
of metal connected end to end to an intervening the rigid frame I of the chair at a point near 60
the front thereof.
tension spring.
Upon the forwardly presented face of the back,
Figure 4 shows an alternative form of resilient
which may if desired be of any other convenient suspension member, for use if desired in place of
- construction, is the upholstery of the back. This a leaf spring. The suspension member, according
also may be of any desired kind or form. In the to this form thereof, consists of a doubled armed 65
form shown. it comprises a facing layer ii of hair, spring 23 composed of stout resilient wire ore rod
_?bre or like upholstery material mounted upon a bent to- the shape shown. It is understood, of
bed of closely spaced pocket springs IS, the said course, that this alternative form of suspension
springs intervening, as shown, between the facing member is employed in conjunction with an elase
l5 and the webs M. It may, however, be com
tically extensible foundation, such as the slats l9
posed wholly of hair, ?bre or similar material or and springs 20, for the upholstery or loose cush
30
for the seat;
v
.
- wholly of sponge rubber; or, with a bed of pocket
.springs, the facing layer may be composed of
sponge rubber. Also, instead of permanent up
15 holstery,_the chair may if desired be fitted with
- 10118.
Referring now to Figure 5, the chair here
shown is of a similar construction to the chair
shown in Figure 2. The leaf springs 18, however, 75
3 .
constituting the suspension members for the seat
of the chair are twisted as shown, at a point near
the rear end so that the ,part of the spring in
rear of the twist lies in a plane parallel with
the general plane of oscillation of the spring as
the seat moves up and down at the front end,
the said rear part of the spring being aiilxed to
a vertically disposed surface of the side member
of the bottom i of the chair frame, namely the
10 inwardly disposed lateral face thereof, by means
of screws, bolts or the like extending through
the spring and into the chair frame in a direc
tion transverse to the plane of oscillation of the
whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed
for use with loose cushions, the combination com
prising a ‘rigid frame for the article, a cross
member forming the front edge of the seat of
the article, a foundation for supporting the up
holstery or cushions of the seat, which foundation
is elastically extensible in the direction of depth
of the seat from back to front thereof and is an
chored at one end to the cross-member and. at
the other end, along a line in the vicinity of the 10
rear edge of the seat, to the rigid frame, the line
of rear anchorage thus of the foundation being,
therefore, of ?xed position relatively to the rigid
frame, and at least one laterally stiff vertically
spring.
resilient cantileversupporting member for the
According to the. further alternative form of seat, which supporting member extends in the
suspension member illustrated in Figure 6, the said direction of depth of the seat with its free
leaf springs l8 have a gradual twist in contrast end towards the front thereof, is fastened at the
to the acute twist of the springs of the construc
?xed end to the rigid frame at a level therein
tion shown in Figure 5, and the springs are af-. below that of the plane occupied by the foundation
"(fixed to vertically disposed surfaces of the rear and carries the cross-member in rigid connec-,
posts 2 (3) of the chair frame instead of to in
tion with it upon the free end, the arrangement
wardly disposed lateral faces of the side members thereby being such that as the cross-member is
of the bottom I.
_
displaced downwardly, under the weight of a per
Referring ?nally to the construction of small son sitting upon the seat, it moves along a path ..
chair in accordance with the invention as il
of increasing distance from the said line of rear
lustrated in Figure 7, the chair shown comprises anchorage of the foundation, partly against the
a rigid frame 24 which may be of any convenient resultant pull of the foundation and partly
construction, according, for example, to the de
against the upward thrust of the supporting
sign of the chair. The front edge of the seat of
member.
the chair is formed by a cross bar 25 a?lxed at
2. In a chair, settee or like article of furniture
the ends to the forward extremities of a pair ‘of whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed
leaf springs 26‘, the rear extremities of which for use with loose cushions, the combination com
are affixed in turn to the underside of a’ rear . prising a rigid frame for the article, a cross
cross member 21 incorporated in the frame 24 member forming the front edge of the seat of
of the chair at the level of the seat thereof. The ‘the article, a foundation for supporting the up
springs 26 are formed with a gradual twist from holstery or cushions of the seat, which founda
end to end as in‘ the case of thesprings ill of the tion is elastically extensible in the direction of
.easy chair of Figure 6. The springs, however, are depth of the seat from back to front thereof and
' disposed with the horizontal ‘end rearmost, that
is anchored at one end to the cross-member and 40
40 is at the ?xed end of the spring, and the vertical
at the other end, along a line in the vicinity of
end foremost. Extending rearwardly from the the rear edge of the seat, to the rigid frame,
cross bar 25, as in the case of the easy chair con
the line of rear anchorage thus of the foundation
structions of Figures 1 to 6, are a number of being, therefore, of fixed position relatively to
elastically extensible webs composed each of ‘an the rigid frame, and two laterally stiff vertically 45,
extensible metal slat 28 ai?xed at the forward end resilient cantilever supporting members for the
to the cross bar 25 and anchored at the rear end seat secured at the ?xed end to the‘ rigid frame
to the rear cross member Z‘Ithrough the inter
and carrying the cross-member in rigid connec
mediary of tension springs 29, the arrangement tion with them upon the free end, the said sup
being such, as before, thatin accordance with porting members‘ being disposed one at either
the general principle of the invention, the front side of the seat and extending, in the said direc
edge of the seat is displaceable downwardly,'un
tion of depth thereof, forwardly of the article
der the weight of a person sitting upon the seat, and upwardly, toward their free end, whereby the
partly against the pull of the elastically extensi
ble webs, which, as will be appreciated, constitute
an elastic foundation for the upholstery of the
seat and partly against upward thrust of the leaf
60
springs. The upholstery of the seat may con
veniently be of sponge rubber, bedded, as will be
understood, upon the elastic foundation con
stituted by the extensible webs referred to.
If desired, instead of employing for the elastic
ally extensible webs of the seat upholstery or
cross-member is caused to travel, in moving
downwardly under the weight of! a person sitting
upon the seat, along a path of increasing distance
from the said line of rear anchorage‘ of the foun
dation, partly against the resultant pull of the
foundation and partly against the upward thrust
of the supporting members.
_
3.. In a chair, settee or like article of furni
ture whereof the seat is upholstered or is con
structed for use with loose cushions, the combi_-'
nation comprising a rigid frame for the article,
a cross-member forming the front edge of the 65
springs as in the above speci?c embodiments of seat of the article, a foundation for supporting
the invention, the webs may comprise simply the upholstery or cushions of the seat, which
lengths 30 of helical tension spring anchored at foundation is; elastically extensible in the di
the forward end to the front cross-member I‘! rection of depth of the seat from back to front‘
or 25 of the seat and at the rear end to the rear ‘ thereof and is anchored at one end to the cross 70
cross-member 6 or 21 of the chair frame, as member and at the other end; along a line in the
shown in Figure 8 of the drawings.
vicinity of the rear edge of the seat, to the rigid
cushion foundation, slats of metal or the like con
nected end to end with a coiled tension spring or
What I claim as my inventioniand desire to '
secure by Letters Patent of the United States
is:--
-
1. In a chair, settee or like article of furniture
frame, the-line of rear anchorage thus of the
foundation being, therefore, of ?xed position
relatively tothe rigid frame, and a plurality of 75
4
2,106,066
leaf springs which constitute laterally stiff ver
tically resilient ‘cantilever supporting members
for the seat, being secured‘at the ?xed end to
the rigid frame and carrying the cross-member
in rigid connection with them ‘upon the free
end, which leaf springsextend, in the said di
rection of depth of the seat,_forwardly of the
said line of rear anchorage of the foundation,
partly against the resultant pull of the founda
tion and partly against the upward thrust of the
leaf springs.
I
‘
6-. In a chair, settee or like'article of furniture
whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed
for use with loose cushions, the combination
comprising a rigid frame for the article, a cross
member forming the front edge of the seat of
‘the article, a foundation for supporting the up 10
10 in -moving downwardly under the weight of a I
article and upwardly, towards their free end,
whereby the cross-member is caused to travel,
person sitting upon the seat, along a path of in
creasing distance from the said line of rear an
chorage of the foundation, partly against the
resultant pull of the foundation and partly
against the upward thrust of the leaf springs.
holstery or cushions of the seat, which founda
tion is elastically extensible in the directionof
depth of the seat from back to front thereof and
is anchoredat one end to the cross-member and
at the other end, along a line in the vicinity of
the rear edge of the seat, to the rigid frame,
the line of rear anchorage thus of the foundation
4. In a chair, settee or like ‘article of furniture
whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed,
being, therefore, of ?xed position relatively to the
for use with loose cushions, the combination com
rigid frame, and a plurality of leaf springs which
prising a rigid frame for the article, a cross
20 member forming the front edge of the seat of
the article, a foundation for supporting the up
holstery or cushions of the seat, which founda
constitute resilient cantilever supporting mem
bers for the seat, 'being secured at the fixed end
to the rigid frame and carrying the cross-mem
tion is elastically extensible in the direction of . her in rigid connection with them upon the free
depth of the seat from backto front thereof and
' is anchored at one end to the cross-member and
at the vother end, along a‘line in the vicinity
of the rear edge of the seat, to the rigid frame,
the line of rear anchorage thus of the founda
tion being, therefore, of ?xed position relatively
30
end, which leaf springs are twisted through a
right angle, are disposed with the fixed end 25
lying in the plane of oscillation of the spring
and affixed to‘ a vertically disposed surface of
the rigid frame by ?xing means extending
through the spring in a direction transverse to
the said plane of oscillation and extend, in the 36
to the rigid frame; and two leaf springs which
constitute laterally stiff vertically resilient canti-, said direction‘ of depthof the seat, forwardly of
lever supporting members for the seat, being ' the article and upwardly, towards their free end,
secured at the ?xed end to the rigid frame and whereby the cross-member is caused to travel,
carrying the cross-member in rigid connection in moving downwardly under the weight of a
- with them upon the free end, which leaf springs
are disposed one at either side of the seat and
extend, in the said direction of ‘ depth thereof,
forwardly of the article and upwardly, towards
their free end, whereby. the cross-member is
caused to travel, in-moving downwardly under
the weight of a person sitting upon the'seat,
along a path of increasing distance from ‘the
said line '_of rear anchorage of the “foundation,
partly against the resultant pull of the foun
person sitting upon the seat, along a path of
increasing distance from the said line of rear
anchorage of the foundation, partly against the
resultant pull of, the foundation and partly
against‘ the upward thrust of the leaf springs.
7. In alchair, settee or like article of furniture
whcreof-thefseat is upholstered or is constructed
for "use 'fwith' loose . cushions, the combination
comprising a rigid frame for the article, a cross
dation and ‘partly against the upward thrust
member forming the front edge of the seat of
the article,'~a:foundation for supporting the up
of the leaf springs.
holstery orcushions of the seat, which founda
_
e.
_
5. In a; chair, settee. or like article of furniture tion is elasticallfutensible in thevdirection of
whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed depth of'the seat from back to front thereof and
for use with loose cushions, the combination -is anchored at one end to the cross-member
and'at the other end, along a line in the vicinity
comprising a rigid frame for the article, a cross
member forming the front edge of the seat of of the rear edge of the seat, to the rigid frame,
‘the line of rear anchorage thus of the founda
the article, a foundation for supporting the up
tion being, therefore, of fixed position relatively
holstery or cushions of the seat, which founda
tion is elastically extensible in the direction of to the rigid’ frame, and a plurality of leaf springs
depth of the seat from back to front thereof and which constitute resilient cantilever supporting
55
is anchored atone end to the cross-member and members for the seat, being secured at the ?xed
at the other end, along a line in the vicinity of end to therigid frame and carrying the cross
vthe rear edge ofv the seat, to the rigid frame,
the line of rear anchorage thus of the founda-_
being, therefore, of ?xed position relatively
to tion
to the rigid frame, and a plurality of leaf springs
which constitute resilient cantilever supporting
members for the seat, being secured at the ?xed
end to the rigid frame and carrying the cross
member in rigid connection with them upon
the free end, which leaf springs are twisted
through a rlght'angle, so that one end is in the
member inrigiekbonnection with them upon the
free end, which leaf springs are twisted with a
gradual twist through a right angle, so that one
end is in the planefof oscillation of the spring
while the other ,isjin. a plane perpendicular
thereto and extend, in the said‘gdirection of depth
of the seat, forwardly, of- the article and up
wardly, towardstheir free end, whereby the
cross-member 'is caused to travel, in moving
downwardly under the weight of a person sit
ting upon the seat, along a path of increasing
plane of oscillation of the spring while the other
is in a plane perpendicular thereto, and extend, Q distance from the said line of rear anchorage
of the foundation; partly against the resultant
in the said direction of depth of the seat,v for
wardly of the article and upwardly. towards _ pull of the foundation and partly against the up
their free end, whereby the cross-member .is ward thrust of the leaf springs. _
caused to travel,.in moving downwardly under 1 v 8."In a‘ chair, settee or like article of furniture
the weight of a person sitting upon the seat, whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed ,
' along a path of increasing distance from the for use with loose cushions,.the combination com- u
2,106,066
5
prising a rigid frame for the article, a cross
member forming the front edge of the seat of the
' article, a foundation for supporting the uphol-_
stery or cushions of the seat, which foundation
in the said direction of depth of the seat with
its free end towards the front thereof, is fas
tened at the ?xed end to the rigid frame at a
level therein below that of the plane occupied
is elastically extensible in the direction of depth
by theifoundation and carries the cross-member
of the seat from back to front thereof and "is
anchored at one end to the cross-member and at
the other end, along a line in the vicinity of the
rear edge of the seat, to the rigid frame, the line
10 of rear anchorage thus of the foundation being,
therefore, of ?xed position relatively to the rigid
frame, and a plurality of leaf springs which con
stitute resilient cantilever supporting members
for the seat, being secured at the ?xed end to the
15 rigid frame and carrying the cross-member in
rigid connection with them upon the free end,
which leaf springs are twisted through a right
angle, so that one end is in the plane of oscillation
of the spring while the other is in a plane per
20 pendicularthereto, with an acute twist which is
situated near the end of the spring which is in the
said plane of oscillation thereof, and extend, in
the said direction of depth of theseat, forwardly
of the article and upwardly, towards their free
end, whereby the cross-member is caused to
travel, in moving downwardly under the weight
of a person sitting upon the seat, along a path
of increasing distance from the said line of rear
anchorage of the foundation, partly against the
30 resultant pull of the foundation and partly
against the upward thrust of the leaf springs.
9. In a chair, settee or like article of furniture
' whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed
for use with loose cushions, the combination com
35 prising a rigid frame for the article, a cross-mem
ber forming the front edge of the seat of the
article, a foundation for supporting the uphol
stery or cushions of the seat, which foundation is
elastically extensible in the direction of depth
of the seat from back to front thereof and is
anchored at one end to the cross-member and
at the' other end, along a line in the vicinity of
the rear edge of the seat, to the rigid frame, the
line of rear anchorage thus of the foundation
~ being, therefore, of ?xed position relatively to
the rigid frame, and at least one laterally sti?
vertically resilient cantilever supporting member
for the seat, which supporting member extends
in rigid connection with it upon the free end,
the supporting member being of semi-elliptical
form with the major axis of the ellipse disposed
horizontally and the arrangement being such
that the cross-member is displaceable down 10
wardly, under the weight of a person sitting upon
the seat, along a path of increasing distance from
the said line of rear anchorage of the foundation,
partly against the resultant pull of the founda-'
tion and partly against the upward thrust of the
supporting member.
10.‘ In a chair, settee or like article of furniture
whereof the seat is upholstered or is constructed
for use with loose cushions, the combination com
prising a rigid frame for the article, a cross v20
member forming the front edge of the seat of the
article, a foundation for supporting the uphol
stery or cushions of the seat, which foundation
is elastically extensible in the direction of depth
of the seat from back to-front thereof and is an 25'
chored at one end to the cross-member and at
the other end, along a line in the vicinity of the
rear edge of the. seat, to the rigid frame, the line
of rear anchorage thus of the foundation being
therefore, of ?xed position relatively to the rigid 30
frame, and at least one resilient. cantilever sup
porting member for the seat, which supporting
member extends in the said direction of depth of
the seat with its free end towards the front there
of, is fastened at the ?xed end to the rigid frame 35
at a level therein below that of the plane occupied
by the foundation and carries the cross-member
in rigid connection with it upon the free end, the
arrangement thereby being such that as the cross
member is displaced downwardly, under the 40
weight of a person sitting upon the seat, it moves
along a path of increasing distance from the said
line of rear anchorage of'the foundation, partly
against the resultant pull of the foundation and
partly against the upward thrust of the support
ing member.
WILLIAM HOWARD SADGROVE.
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