close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2106202

код для вставки
Jan. 25, 1938.
c, AHRQNHEIM
2,106,202
ARCH SUPPORT
Filved Nov. 14, 1936
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
.272 yen 5'01" 7
0/2 arleo" Ah ran/zez'm
' lit-5415'
Jan. 25, 1938.
2,106,202
c. AHRONHEIM
ARCH SUPPORT
Filed Nov. 14, 1936
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
/
i
H
I
I My
I‘IIIIIIIII’I'IIIIIIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII »
////////////////////////////.
/
.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
In z/en 2'0?
Charla: Ahrorz/zeim
Jan. 25, 1938.
c_ AHRONHEIM
2,106,202
ARCH SUPPORT
Filed Nov. 14, 1936
s Sheets-Sheet s
In 1/‘ en 27024
C’lzarles jlhrarz/zeim
2,106,202
Patented Jan. 25, 1938
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,106,202
ARCH sUPPo-n'T
Charles Ahronheim, Highland Park, Ill., assignor
:11; one-half to Eugene P. Lieberthal, Chicago,
> Application November 14, 1936, Serial No. 110,902
10 Claims,
This invention relates to arch supports.
It is an object of this invention to provide an
improved arch support which is relatively simple
and inexpensive in construction and e?icient in
5 use.
The mechanics of the operation of walking may
be divided, roughly, into three parts: At ?rst the
human foot, as is well known, comes down upon
the heel, onto which the entire weight of the body
10 is ?rst delivered, then the entire weight of the
body is shifted to the outside of the front part
of the foot, and ?nally a part, less than all, of
the entire weight of the body is transferred to the
inside of the front part of the foot, at the end of
15 the walking operation, which is thus divided,
roughly, into this three-stage operation.
In the case of people who have a tendency to
ward ?at feet or fallen arches this defect origi
nates at the ?rst stage of the walking operation,
20 that is, when the entire weight of the body is
?rst brought down upon the heel and it carries
through each of
above. Various
made to correct
25 and correct the
the two succeeding stages, stated
attempts have heretofore been
this difficulty, that is, to prevent
tendency of many people to de
velop ?at feet or fallen arches, such as by the
use of both rigid and resilient heels and both re
silient and rigid arch supports, but these attempts
have been concerned, insofar as I am aware, large
30 ly if not entirely, with the ?rst and second stages
of the walking operation to which reference has
been made above, and none of the prior art at~
tempts have, insofar as I am aware, been con
cerned with the third and ?nal stage in the
35 walking operation and in which a part of the
weight of the body is transferred or “rolled” from
the outside of the front part of the foot to the
inside of the same. The present invention,
therefore, while concerned with the provision of
40 an arch support which is designed generally for
the prevention and correction of fallen arches
or ?at feet is especially concerned with the pro
vision of an arch support which will function to
conform with the mechanics of the walking op—
45 eration itself and to prevent and correct this
trouble at the second and third stages in the walk
ing operation itself, that is, when the weight of
the body is ?rst transferred to the outside of the
front part or ball of the foot and is then trans
50 ferred or “rolled”, in part, to the inside of the
same.
It may be added that the condition known as
flat feet or fallen arches is caused, in general, by
the weakening of the muscles of the foot which
support the bones which form both the longitudi
(01. 36—-71)
nal and the transverse or metatarsal arches of the
foot, and the proper treatment for the correc
tion and prevention of fallen arches or ?at feet
consists, essentially, in providing an arch sup
port which will massage these muscles during the
second and third of the above-mentioned stages
of the walking operation, and which will also
support these arches and prevent the same from
?attening out during the walking operation.
Another object of the present invention, there
fore, is to provide an arch support which will, dur
ing the ?rst and second stages of the walking op
eration, massage the muscles of the foot which
hold or support the bones of the longitudinal arch
and which will also massage the muscles which
15
hold or support the bones of the transverse or»
metatarsal arch.
>
A further object of the present invention is to
provide an arch support which is not only resilient,
or yieldable, under the weight of the body, as other
prior art arch supports have been, but which will,
by exerting an upward pressure on the same dur
ing the third stage of the walking operation,
massage those muscles of the foot which'hold
or support the bones of the longitudinal arch and
which will also, by exerting an upward pressure
upon the second, third and fourth metatarsal
bones during the walking operation, massage those
muscles of the foot which hold or support the
30
bones of the transverse or metatarsal arch.
Still another object of the'present invention is
to provide an arch support which is simple and
inexpensive in construction and which may be
readily used with various types of shoes and either
35
as an insert in, that is, as an insole, or built into,
the same.
An additional object of the present invention
is to provide, in a removable form of the new
arch support, a novel device which functions both
as a latch for latching the arch support in posi
tion'of use to the insole and also as a brace for
the same.
Another object of the present invention is to
provide a new and improved arch support which 45
is especially designed for use by people whose
weight is considerably above average and by
people, such as policemen, mail carriers and bar
bers, whose work requires them to stand, or be on
their feet, for long periods at a time.
50
Other objects will appear hereinafter.
The invention consists in the novel combination
and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter de
scribed and claimed.
The invention will be best understood by ref 55
2
2,106,202
erence to the accompanying drawings showing
v the preferred form of construction, and in which:
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred form
of the new arch support, that is, of the support
The two resilient members or pieces I6 and I"!
of the longitudinal arch supporting unit 55 are
detachably held against separation, by means of
crimped edges or depending ?anges I8 and I9
01
for the longitudinal arch of the foot, as seen sep
arate, or detached, from a shoe into which it may
which are formed in the front and rear end por
be built, as well as from a casing or insole into
which receive corresponding front and rear end
which it may be inserted;
portions 20 and 2 I, respectively, of the lower piece
or brace H; the said pieces II; and I? being
latched or held against lateral movement relative 10
to each other by means of a crimped edge por
tion or upstanding ?ange 22 which is formed on
the lower piece or brace IT, at the outer side or
marginal edge of the latter, and which receives a
,
Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view of the arch sup
10 port or supporting unit shown in Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a transverse vertical sectional view of
the arch support or arch-supporting unit shown
in Figs. 1 and 2 and is taken on line 3--3 in Fig. l ;
Fig. 4 is a longitudinal central sectional view of
15 the arch support shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 and is
taken on line 4-4 in Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a top plan view showing the arch sup
port or arch-supporting unit which is shown in
Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive arranged in a pocket which
is formed in a casing or insole and showing the
new supporting unit for the transverse or meta
tarsal arch likewise arranged in a pocket which is
formed in the said casing or insole;
Fig. 6 is a. longitudinal central sectional view
25 showing the new arch support, which is shown
in Fig. 5, arranged in a shoe of conventional de
Slgn;
~
Fig. '7 is a transverse vertical sectional view, on
line ‘I—'I in Fig. 5, showing the new arch-sup
30 porting unit for the transverse or metatarsal
arch of the foot, and showing the same arranged
in a pocket which is provided therefor in the cas
ing or insole which is shown in Figs. 5 and 6;
Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the new arch
35 supporting unit for the transverse or metatarsal
arch and showing the same removed from the
pocket in which the same is shown in Figs. 5, 6
and 7;
Fig. 9 is a bottom plan view of a modi?ed form
of thenew arch support and showing the same as
especially designed for use as an insert in articles
of footwear;
Fig. 10 is a longitudinal sectional detail view
showing certain parts of the arch support shown
45 in Fig. 9;
Fig. 11 is a perspective view showing certain
parts of the arch support which are shown in
Fig. 10;
Fig. 12 is a transverse sectional detail view on
line I2--I2 in Fig. 9, of the metatarsal arch-sup
porting unit which is embodied in the arch sup
port shown in Fig. 9; ‘
Fig. 13 is a top plan View of the upper resilient
member which is embodied in the arch-support
ing unit shown in Figs. 9 to 11 inclusive; and
Fig. 14. is a top plan View of the lower resilient
tions, respectively, of the upper piece I8 and
corresponding edge portion 22 of the upper piece 15
or member I6.
It will be noted, by reference to Figs. 2, 3 and 5
of the drawings, that the upper piece or resilient
member I6 is considerably wider than the re
silient lower member or brace 51, this diifercnce
being represented by an inner marginal edge por
tion 24 of the resilient upper piece or member it
which projects over and beyond the inner mar
ginal edge 25 of the resilient lower piece or brace
25
H (see Figs. 2, 3 and 5).
In the use of the new longitudinal arch-sup
porting unit I5 the same may be arranged in a
pocket 26 which is formed in a casing or insole TI,
the said casing or insole 21 being preferably
formed of relatively soft material such, for exam 30
ple, as leather or the like, and the pocket 26 is
provided with an opening at the front end thereof
through which the said arch-supporting unit I5
may be inserted into the same.
The present invention also provides a resilient
support or supporting unit for the transverse or
metatarsal arch of the foot and this transverse
arch support or supporting unit is generally in
dicated at 28 and consists of a piece of resilient
material 29 which is preferably formed of re 110
silient metal such, for example, as so-called
spring steel or the like. This supporting mem
ber 29 is arched upwardly and is preferably ar
ranged in a pocket 3i) which is formed in the
front end portion of the casing or insole 27, this
pocket 38 extending transversely of the said in
sole or casing 27 and having an opening 3i at one
end thereof through which the said metatarsal
arch supporting member 29 may be inserted into
the pocket 30.
In the use of the longitudinal and metatarsal
arch-supporting units I 5 and 28, respectively, the
former may be inserted into the pocket 26 in the
insole or casing 27, through the open front end of
the said pocket 25, and the. transverse or meta
tarsal arch-supporting unit 23 may be inserted
member or main brace which is embodied in the
into the pocket 30 through the opening 3 I, where
form of the arch-supporting unit shown in Figs.
upon the insole or casing 2'3, with the said arch
supporting units I5 and 28 arranged in their re
9 to- 11 inclusive.
.
A preferred form of one unit of the new longi
tudinal arch supporting unit is shown in Figs. 1
to 6 inclusive of the drawings, and said unit is
therein generally indicated at I5. This unit I5
consists, essentially, of an upper resilient mem~
65 ber I6 and a lower resilient member I'I, both of
which are formed of resilient material which is
60
spective pockets 2?.» and 38, may be inserted into 60
a shoe 32, it being understood that the insole or
casing 21 and the shoe 32 shown in the drawings
are of conventional design and that the shape
and design of the insole or casing 2'3’, as well as of
the shoe 32, will be made to conform to the size
and requirements of various individuals, and of
preferably, but not necessarily, metal, and for
both men and women.
this purpose resilient or so-called spring steel is
well suited. The two resilient members or pieces
I6 and Il are arranged one above the other in the
order named, and are curved lengthwise. or axially
It may be noted, at this point, that the arch
supporting units I5 and 28 shown in Figs. 1 to
8, inclusive, and thus far described may be used
so as to form a support for the longitudinal arch
of the human foot, and when in position of use
the lower piece or member I‘! forms, in effect, a
75 brace for the upper piece or member I6.
in conjunction with an insole or casing 271', as
an insert, or they, and either of them, may be
built into a shoe and as a permanent installation
in the same, whereas the modi?ed form of arch
supporting unit shown in Figs. 9 to 14 is intended
.
3
2,106,202
to be used as an insert in a shoe or other article
of footwear and not as a permanent installation
in the same.
When the arch-supporting unit I5 is in use
UK it functions to support the longitudinal or main
ginal edge of the same.
Hence, the new arch
supporting unit l5 ?exes differentially, that is, to
about the same extent or degree at both longi
tudinal sides of the same and thus accommodates
itself to the varying or different amounts of the
arch of the foot and, at the same time, it gently
vwearer’s weight which are placed thereon, and
massages and exercises those muscles which sup
hence the new arch support gently massages and
exercises those muscles of‘the foot which sup
port the bones which form the longitudinal
arch; this being accomplished during both the
10 second and third stages of the walking opera
tion, that is, both of the resilient members It
and I7 yield or ?ex when the entire weight of the.
wearer’s body is placed on the outside of the
port the bones in the longitudinal arch of the
same during both the second and third stages 10
of the walking operation. It will be seen, there
eration, and both of these resilient members also
yield or ?ex during the third stage of the walking
fore, that the new arch-supporting unit 85 is
thus so constructed that it will accomplish what
an arch support must do in order to correct and
prevent ?at feet or fallen arches, that is, gently
massage those muscles which support the bones of
operation, that is, when less than the entire
the longitudinal arch, during the operation of
weight of the wearer’s body is placed on the in
side of the foot. It is to be noted, however, that
by reason of the fact that less than the entire
weight of the wearer’s body is thrown upon the
inside of the foot during the third stage of the
Walking operation whereas the entire weight of
the body is thrown upon the outside of the foot
during the second stage of the same, the upper
member N5 of the arch-supporting unit I5 is not
walking, and both when the entire weight of the
body is placed on the outer side of the foot, dur
foot, during the second stage of the walking op
supported by the brace ll throughout its entire
bottom surface or area, thereby enabling the up
per member Hi to ?ex and yield, throughout its
inner marginal edge portion 24, during the afore
said third stage of the walking operation. This
also enables the members l6 and I‘! to- massage
or exercise the muscles which support the bones
‘of the longitudinal arch of the foot uniformly
during both the second and third stages of the
walking operation which is not done by other
resilient or stiff arch supports with which appli
ing the second stage of the Walking operation, 20
and when less than the entire weight of the
body is placed upon the inner side of the foot
during the third stage of the walking operation.
It will also be noted that in the use of the
present invention the metatarsal or transverse
arch supporting unit 28—29 functions both when
the entire weight of the body is ?rst placed upon
the outer side of the foot,’ during the second
stage of the walking operation, and also when
less than the entire weight of the body is placed
upon the inner side of the foot, during the third‘
stage of the walking operation, that is, the re
silient arch-supporting member 259, being arched
transversely of the foot extends under and lifts
upwardly upon the second, third and fourth
metatarsal bones of the metatarsal arch, and
?exes when the weight of the body is placed
thereon, as explained above, thereby causing a
gentle lifting action against the bones of the
metatarsal arch, thus massaging those muscles 4.0
cant is familiar and which make no allowance
for the fact that less than the entire weight of
40 the wearer’s body is thrown onto the inside of
the foot during the third and ?nal stage of the
walking operation whereas the entire weight of
the body is thrown upon the outer side of the
foot during the second stage of the walking
45 operation. By reason of this fact rigid or stiff
arch supports are useless to correct or prevent
which support the bones of the transverse or
metatarsal arch.‘ In this manner the metatarsal
arch support 28 overcomes the weakness in, or
flat feet or fallen arches since they can not, at
any time, massage or exercise those muscles of
ing sponge rubber pads and stiff metatarsal arch
supports, for the reason that these supports do
the foot which support the bones of the longi
50 tudinal and transverse arches, and this exercis
ing of these muscles is absolutely essential to
both the correction and prevention of this con
dition. Furthermore, other resilient arch sup
ports with which I am familiar are also unable
to correct this condition because they either yield
too far when the entire weight of the wearer’s
body is thrown onto the outer side of the foot,
during the second stage of the walking operation,
or else they do not yield far enough, but, in any
60 event, none of the other resilient arch supports
with which I am familiar yields di?erentially,
that is, throughout the outer marginal edge por
tion of the arch support when the entire weight
of the body is thrown upon this part of the foot
c: Cl» during the second stage of the walking operation
and then, approximately to the same extent,
throughout the inner marginal edge portion of
the arch support when less than the entire weight
of the body is thrown on this part of the foot
during the third stage of the walking operation.
This is so because none of the other resilient
arch supports with which I am familiar provides
less support, (that is, an unbraced support)
along the inner marginal edge portion of the arch
’ support than is provided along the outer mar
fallen condition of, the metatarsal arch and this
is not accomplished by other metatarsal arch -.
supports with which applicant is familiar, includ
not exercise or massage those muscles which
support the bones of the metatarsal arch and
weakness or a weakened condition of which
muscles is responsible for the weakness or fallen
condition of this arch. Hence, it will be seen
that the present metatarsal arch support will
effectively perform its intended function, while
being simple and inexpensive in construction and
easy and simple to install.
‘
It will also be noted that both the longitudinal
arch-supporting unit l5 and the metatarsal arch
supporting unit 28-49 of the new arch-support (30
ing unit are not fixed in their respective pockets
26 and 30 but are free to move or yield slightly
therein, that is, in a direction parallel to the
long axis of the casing or insole 2?], thus allowing
the said arch-supporting units to give slightly
under the forward thrust or force exerted there—
on during the walking operation, and, in this
manner, relieving and ‘minimizing the shock
upon both arches of the wearer’s foot.
A modi?ed form of the new arch support is
shown in Figs. 9 to 14, inclusive, is therein gen
erally indicated at 33, and comprises a pad or
insole 34 which may be inserted into a shoe or'
other article of footwear, and which pad or in
2,106,202
sole maybe made of leather or other suitable
material.
Formed in the front end portion of the pad
or insole 34 is a pocket 35 which extends trans
versely oi the long axis of the insole 33, and this
pocket 35 has an open end 35 through which a
resilient member 37 may be inserted into the
pocket 35; said member 31 being adapted to sup
port the metatarsal or transverse arch of the foot
10 and being of the same design, type and construc
tion as the member 29 which is illustrated in
Fig. 8.
The new arch support 33 comprises a longi
tudinal arch-supporting unit 38 and this arch
15 supporting unit 38 includes an upper resilient
member 33 and a lower resilient member 43 both
of which are preferably made of resilient metal
for which so-cailed spring steel is desired. Both
of these members 39 and 40 are arched longitudi
nally (Fig. 10) so as to conform, in general, to
the longitudinal arch of the foot. These mem
bers 39 and 45 are constructed, relative to each
other, like the members it and ii, respectively,
of the arch-supporting unit i5, that is, the lower
member 55 extends under, and acts as a brace
for, the upper member 38 throughout the central
and outer (lower portion, Fig. 9) marginal edge
portions of the said upper member 39 but leaves
the latter unsupported along the inner marginal
edge portion 5! of the same (upper edge portion,
Fig. 9), for reasons hereinbefore explained rela
tive to the arch-supporting unit 45.
Arranged below the lower member or brace 53
is a second and auxiliary brace 42 which is pref
erably made of a thin piece of resilient metal
which is substantially rectangular in shape, this
auxiliary brace 42 being, therefore, relatively very
narrow compared to- the main brace 43 and the
member 39 (Figs. 9 and 11).
The auxiliary brace 42 is pivotally connected
by means of a pintle 4-3 with the insole or pad 34,
this pintle 43 being mounted in, and ‘carried by,
the upper member 39 and being projected down
wardly through a slot 44 which is formed in the
rear end portion of the auxiliary brace 32 (Fig.
11). Likewise provided in the auxiliary brace 42,
on the front end portion of the same, is a second
slot 45 and projecting downwardly through this
slot 45 is a. latch key 45 which is carried by, and
is formed in, the member 49.
Provided in the marginal edge portion of the
member 48, at the front of the latter, is a notch
and also formed in the marginal edge of the
member 43, at the rear thereof, is a. notch 58.
Mounted in, and depending from, the members
are two pins or stops 5!} and 5! which are ar
ranged adjacent the peripheral edge of the mem
ber 39 and at the front and rear ends of the
same, respectively, these stops 5E) and 5! being
adapted to be engaged by the inner marginal
edge 52 of the lower member or brace 4-3.
Slidably mounted upon the auxiliary brace 42
is a sleeve 53, which may be made of leather or
the like, and formed in this sleeve 53 is an open
ing 53 which is adapted to ?t over, and to re
ceive, the latch or key 46. Likewise slidably
mounted upon the brace 42 is a sleeve 55 which
is provided with an opening 58 which is adapted
to ?t over, and to receive, the pintle 53.
In the use of the new arch support which is
shown in Figs. 9 to 14 inclusive the metatarsal
arch-supporting unit 31 may be arranged in its
pocket 35 by inserting the same into the latter
' through the opening 36 therein, whereupon, when
the pad or insole 34 is arranged in a shoe or other
article of footwear, the said metatarsal arch sup
port 31 will function, in the manner hereinbefore
described with reference to the member 29 (Fig.
8), to support the metatarsal arch and to mas
sage the muscles which support the bones of the
same.
The manner of assembling the arch—supporting
unit 38 is as follows: The pad or insole 34 is in
verted so that the bottom surface is uppermost,
as in Fig. 9, whereupon the members 45 and 39 10
are arranged one above the other, in the order
named, with the pintle 43 projecting through the
notch 48 which is formed in the lower member
or brace 43. The member 40 is then pivoted
about the pintle 48 (clockwise, Fig. 11) until the 15
marginal edge 52 of the same engages the stops
50 and 5|, whereupon the member 40 is pressed
downwardly against the member 39 so that the
key or latch 46 will project through the notch 41
in the brace or lower member 40. The auxiliary 20
brace 42 is then pivoted about the pintle 43
(clockwise, Fig. 11) until the slot 45 formed
therein comes into registration with the latch
or key 56, whereupon the latter is turned or ro
tated a partial revolution so that the head or 25
lower portion of the same extends‘ crosswise of
the slot 45 (Fig. 9), thus latching the parts 39,
4E! and 42 together in position of use and to the
pad or insole 34. The sleeves 53 and 55 may then
be slid along the auxiliary brace 42 until the 30
lower end portions or heads of the latch mem
bers 43 and 45 enter the openings 56 and 54, re
spectively, in the sleeves 55 and 53. The arch
supporting unit 38 is thus assembled in position
of use and ready to be inserted, with the pad or 35
insole 35, into a shoe or other article of footwear,
and when arranged therein it will function in
substantially the same manner as the arch-sup
porting unit 38. It is to be noted, however, that
the modi?ed form of arch support which is shown
in Figs. 9 to 14 inclusive is especially designed
for use as an insert into a shoe or the like, and
for use by people whose weight is considerably
above average, and by people, such as policemen,
mail carriers and barbers whose Work requires 45
them to stand for long periods of time. It is also
to be noted, in this connection, that the auxiliary
brace 42 provides additional support for the mem
bers 39 and 45 of the arch-supporting unit 38, in
addition to acting as a part of the means 42— 50
43—44—4il-—45--45—4'i for latching the parts 39
and 4B of the arch-supporting unit 38 upon the
pad or insole 38, and hence the arch-supporting
unit 38, by reason of this auxiliary brace 42, may
be used by people whose weight is considerably 55
above average and for whom the arch-supporting
unit l5 might not be su?iciently strong, as well as
by people whose work requires them to stand for
a long period of time.
In the use of the new arch support 33 the 60
sleeves 53 and 55 will prevent the wearer’s foot
from being irritated by the metal latches or keys
43 and 45, the lower end portions or heads of
which project into the openings 56 and 54, re
65
spectively in the sleeves 55 and 53.
The members 39 and 40 may be removed from
the pad or insole 34, if so desired, for any reason,
such as to substitute a heavier or stronger or
lighter pair of the members 39 and 40, this be
ing accomplished by ?rst sliding the sleeve 53 70
back into the position in which it is shown in
Fig. 9, then turning the latch 46 until the lower
end portion or head of the same extends parallel
to the long axis of the slot 45, then pivoting the
auxiliary brace 42, at 43, (counterclockwise, Fig. 75
2,106,202
9), whereupon the members 39 and 40 may be
forced or spread apart slightly so as to remove the
key 46 from the notch M. The members 40 may
then be separated from the member 39 by remov
ing the notched portion 48, thereof (Fig. 14) from
out of engagement with the pintle 43.
It will be noted that the stops or pins 50 and
El limit the movement of the lower member or
brace Mi, relative to the upper member 39, (clock
10 wise, Figs. 9 and 11), so as to leave the inner
marginal edge portion M of the upper member
39 unsupported by the lower member or brace ?ll
along the inner marginal edge portion (ll of the
upper member 39, for reasons hereinbefore set
15 forth relative to the marginal edge portion 24
of the arch-supporting unit l5.
While I have illustrated and described the pre
ferred forms of construction for carrying my
invention into effect, this is capable of variation
20 and modi?cation, without departing from the
spirit of the invention. I, therefore, do not wish
to be limited to the precise details of construction
set forth, but desire to avail myself of such varia
tions and modi?cations as come within the scope
of the appended claims.
Having thus described my invention, what I
claim as new and desire to protect by Letters
Patent is:
1. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot
5.
therein for the reception of the said arch—sup
porting unit.
4. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot
comprising a resilient upper member and a re
silient lower member, the said resilient lower
member being arranged below the said resilient
upper member and extending throughout sub
stantially less than the entire area or bottom
surface of the said upper member but when in po
sition of use making contact throughout sub 10
stantially its entire upper surface with the bot
tom surface of said upper member so as to brace
the said upper member under and throughout the
entire area of the central and outer marginal edge
portions. of the latter but leaving the same unsup 15
ported along the inner marginal edge portion of
the same‘, means for detachably holding the said
upper and lower members together, and a casing
having a pocket formed therein for the reception
of the said arch-supporting unit.
20
5. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot
comprising a resilient upper member and a re
silient lower member, the said resilient lower
member being arranged below the said resilient
upper member and extending throughout sub 25
stantially less than the entire area or bottom
surface of the said upper member but when in
position of use making contact throughout sub
stantially its entire upper surface with the bot
comprising a resilient upper member and a re
tom surface of said upper member so as to brace 30
silient lower member, the said resilient lower
member being arranged below the said resilient
upper member and extending throughout sub
the said upper member under and throughout
the entire area of the central and outer margi
surface of said upper member so as to brace
nal edge portions of the latter but leaving the
same unsupported along the inner marginal edge
portion of the same, and means for detachably
holding the said upper and lower members to
gether, said means including a depending ?ange
or crimped edge formed in the front end portion
the said upper member under and throughout
the entire area of the central and outer marginal
edge portions of the latter but leaving the same
the front end portion of the said lower member,
and a depending flange or crimped edge formed
stantially less than the entire area or bottom sur
face of the said upper member but when in posi
tion of use making contact throughout substan
tially its entire upper surface with the bottom
unsupported along the inner marginal edge por
tion of the same.
2. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot
45 comprising a resilient upper member and a re
silient lower member, the said resilient lower
member being arranged below the said resilient
upper member and extending throughout sub
stantially less than the entire area or bottom sur
50 face of the said upper member but when in posi
tion of use making contact throughout sub
stantially its entire upper surface with the bot
tom surface of said upper member so as to brace
the said upper member under and throughout
55 the entire area of the central and outer marginal
of the said upper member for the reception of
in the rear end portion of the said upper member
for the reception of the rear end portion of the
said lower member.
6. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot
comprising a resilient upper member and a resili
ent lower member, the said resilient lower mem
ber being arranged below the said resilient upper
member and extending throughout substantially
less than the entire area or bottom surface of
the said upper member but when in position of
use making contact throughout substantially its
entire upper surface with the bottom surface of
said upper member so as to brace the said upper
member under and throughout the entire area of
the central and outer marginal edge portions of
the latter but leaving the same unsupported along
the inner marginal edge portion of the same, and
tion of the same, and means for detachably hold
means for detachably latching or holding the said
ing
the
said
upper
and
lower
members
together.
60
3. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot upper and lower members together, said latching
means including a depending ?ange or crimped
comprising a resilient upper member and a re
edge formed in the front end portion of the said
silient lower member, the said resilient lower
member being arranged below the said resilient upper member for the reception of the front end
portion of the said lower member, and a depend
65 upper member and extending throughout sub
ing ?ange or crimped edge formed in the rear
stantially less than the entire area or bottom sur
end portion of the said upper member for the
face of the said upper member but when in posi
reception of the rear end portion of the said lower
tion of use making contact throughout substan
member, said latching means including a depend
tially its entire upper surface with the bottom sur- ‘ ing ?ange or crimped edge formed on the outer
70 face of said upper member so as to brace the said marginal edge portion of the said upper member 70
upper member under and throughout the entire for the reception of a corresponding part of the
area of the central and outer marginal edge por
outer marginal edge portion of the said lower
tion of the latter but leaving the same unsup
member.
ported along the inner marginal edge portion of
1 7. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot
the same, and a casing having a pocket formed comprising a resilient metal upper member and a 75
edge portions of the latter but leaving the same
unsupported along the inner marginal edge por
2,106,202
resilient metal lower member, the said resilient
lower member being arranged below the said re
silient upper member and extending throughout
substantially less than the entire area or bottom
surface of the said upper member but when in
position of use making contact throughout sub
stantially its entire upper surface with the bot
tom surface of said upper member so as to brace
the said upper member under and throughout
the entire area of the central and outer mar
ginal edge portions of the latter but leaving the
same unsupported along the inner marginal edge
portion of the same.
8. An arch-supporting unit for the human foot
15 comprising a resilient metal upper member and a
resilient metal lower member, the said resilient
lower member being arranged below the said re
silient upper member and extending throughout
substantially less than the entire area or bottom
surface of the said upper member but when in
position of use making contact throughout sub
stantially its entire upper surface with the bot
tom surface of said upper member so as to brace
the said upper member under and throughout the
25 entire area of the central and outer marginal
edge portions of the latter but leaving the same
unsupported along the inner marginal edge por
tion of the same, and means formed integrally
with‘, and as a part, of the said upper member and
30 cooperating with the said lower member to hold
the said members together and in position of
use.
9. An arch supporting unit for the human foot
comprising a pad or insole adapted to be inserted
into a shoe or like article of footwear, a resilient
upper member and a resilient lower member, the
said resilient lower member being arranged below
the said resilient upper member and extending
throughout substantially less than the entire
area or bottom surface of said upper member but
when in position of use making contact through
out substantially its entire upper surface with UK
the bottom surface of said upper member so as
to brace the said upper member under and
throughout the entire area of the central and
outer marginal edge portions of the latter but
leaving the same unsupported along the inner 10
marginal edge portion of the same, and means
for holding the said upper and lower resilient
members to the said pad or insole and against
movement relative thereto.
10. An arch supporting unit for the human foot
comprising a pad or insole adapted to be inserted
into a shoe or like article of footwear, a resilient
upper member and a resilient lower member, the
said resilient lower member being arranged be
low the said resilient upper member and extend
ing throughout substantially less than the entire
area or bottom surface of said upper member but
when in position of use making contact through
out substantially its entire upper surface with the
bottom surface of said upper member so as to
brace the said upper member under and through
out the entire area of the central and outer mar
ginal edge portions of the latter but leaving the
same unsupported along the inner marginal edge
portion of the same, and means for holding the -
said upper and lower resilient members together
upon the said pad or insole and against move
ment relative thereto, said means including a
brace extending axially of the said lower resilient
member below the latter and between the front -=
and rear end portions of the same.
CHARLES AHRONHEIM.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
1 116 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа