close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2106379

код для вставки
Jan. 25, 1938.
E. e. NEWING
2,106,379
METHOD FOR MOUNTING PRINTING SURFACES
Filed May 23, 1934
4
Lg?
0
>‘ 8‘
’
‘inventor;
.
EDWARD
J5,
GEORGE NEW/N6
\,
WW”%.
Patented Jan. 25, 1938
. 2,106,379
‘UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,106,379
METHOD FOR MOUNTING PRINTING
SURFACES
Edward George Newing, Dover, England
Application May 23, 1934, Serial No. 727,193
In Great Britain June 1, 1933
5 Claims.
This
invention
concerns
improvements
(Cl. EQ'WMS)
in
methods for mounting printing surfaces and has
among its objects to facilitate the mounting of
printing process plates onto their bases, whereby
5 the plates may be a?ixed to these bases so that
movement in any direction is prevented or re
duced to a minimum, to obviate the necessity of
employing wood for the bases and to render the
use of solder and rivets or screws in the case
10 of metal bases and the use of nails or screws
in the case of wood bases unnecessary and to
eliminate or reduce to a minimum the trouble
some and time~wasting operation known as
“make-ready”.
15
According to the invention the base 4 may al
ready be provided with the depressions and raised
parts ready to receive the corresponding raised
parts 3 and depressions 2 in the plates or the
depressions and raised parts may be imparted to
the bases by affixing a metal plate provided with
the depressions and raised parts to a base of
softer material than the metal plate and then
applying the requisite pressure with, if necessary,
the application of heat.
This method can be
utilized for imparting the requisite depressions
As is known wood bases are not entirely satis
and raised parts to a softer plate than the base
factory for mounting printing process plates be
by providing the base with depressions and raised
cause they are liable to warp or give when pres
parts corresponding to those which are to be
sure is applied and moreover offer difficulties in
presenting a smooth ?at surface of the correct
formed in the plates.
2 O height during the printing.
Moreover there is
always the danger of movement of the plate on
its base with adverse effects on the printing.
The invention will now be described with refer
ence to the accompanying drawing, in which:
25
sions of the bases being adapted to receive the
raised parts of the plates and the raised parts
being adapted to ?t the depressions in the bases.
Figure 1 is a plan view of the reverse side of
a printing plate which has been provided with
raised parts,
1
Fig. 2 is a section along the line 2--2 of Fig. 1,
Fig. 3 is a plan view of the upper surface of a
30 base plate which has been provided with grooves,
Fig. 4 is a section taken on line, 4~—4 of Fig. 3,
Fig. 5 is a plan view of a base plate as shown
in Fig. 3 onto which the printing plate as shown
in Fig. 1 has been pressed and then removed,
Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a standard
85
mounting quotation provided with grooves on its
upper surface, and with lighter cut grooves
around the middle of its vertical sides,
Fig. 7 is a perspective view partly in section
40 of six standard mounting quotations mounted
together to form a base and locked along one
side by a locking plate, and
Fig. 8 is an elevational view of the rear side
of the locking plate.
According to the invention the method for at
45
taching or joining metal printing process plates
to metal or wood or other bases so as to prevent
movement in any direction consists in providing
the plates I on their lower surfaces with depres
50 sions and raised parts such as furrows 2 and
ridges 3 and attaching the plates, for example
by pressure or joining the plates with adhesives
such as shellac or cement to the bases 4 which
are similarly provided with depressions and raised
55 parts such as furrows and ridges, the depres
.
I According to the invention if it is desired to
attach a soft metal plate to a harder base, say 20
of cast iron, an intermediate plate provided on
its upper surface with the depressions and raised
parts may be attached to the harder base, if
necessary with the aid of screws or the like, and
then the soft metal plate containing the corre
sponding raised parts and depressions can be at
tached thereto. Alternatively the soft metal plate
could be pressed onto the harder metal plate and
thereby be given the requisite corresponding
raised parts and depressions.
30
In the case in which both the printing plate
and the base are of soft metal an intermediate
plate provided with depressions and raised parts
on both surfaces could be ?xed to the upper sur
face of the base and to the under surface of the
printing plate.
The surfaces of the printing plate or of the
base or of both may have already the requisite
corresponding raised parts and depressions or
one or both of such surfaces may be provided
with the corresponding requisite depressions and
raised parts'by the application of pressure and,
if necessary, heat.
I
According to a further feature of the invention
the method of attaching metal surfaces to other
surfaces to prevent relative movement may be
utilized in setting up a composite base for print
ing process plates such as shown in Fig. 7. In
this case the vertical sides of the parts of the
base vor mounting quotation 4’ are provided with 50
grooves 5, depressions or the like in any desired
arrangement and strips 7 of harder material,
provided on each face with depressions 3 and
raised portions 9, are interposed between the ver
tical sides of adjoining parts of said base, so that
2
2,106,379
the grooves, depressions or the like abut against
the depressions and raised portions of the strips,
whereafter the whole is locked by the application
of pressure which causes the vertical sides of
the parts of the base to be provided with depres
sions and raised parts corresponding to those on
the strips. Thus in the case when unit bases
of say type metal, such as standard mounting
quotations 4’, are to be joined together to form
10 a composite unit for supporting a printing proc
ess plate, metal locking plates 1 harder than the
unit bases, e. g. of zinc and containing depres
sions and raised parts on one or both surfaces
are interposed between the respective units which
are then looked together under the application
of pressure. By this means any tendency of the
respective units to spring when locked together
is avoided.
According to the invention in an alternative
method of setting up a composite base, indi
vidual units such as quotations of soft metal pro
vided with grooves are locked under pressure or
with an adhesive against individual units of
harder metal, said units of harder metal being
provided with raised portions on their vertical
sides forming indentations in the soft metal units
when the pressure is applied.
An embodiment of the invention will now be
described by way of example with reference to the
30 mounting of a rectangular copper process plate
I on a type metal base 4.
The top surface of the base is provided with
40
operation instead of pressing the plate down ?rst,
then lifting it and repressing it.
If desired the chevron shaped depressions 2
and raised portions 3 may be replaced by straight
or wave shaped or even circular or elliptical de
pressions and raised portions.
The plate may be provided with the necessary
depressions and raised parts by cutting the same
with a chisel whose end has been slightly rounded
by grinding. No precision is required in making 10
the cuts in any particular directions and parts of
the plates may be provided with extra depressions
and raised parts if desired.
In order to facilitate the lifting of the plate
from the mount after ?xing down for printing 15
without bending the plate or disturbing the base a
few clear channels without depressions or raised
parts are provided in each side of the plate in
ordertouallow a lifting wedge to be inserted.
During the production of the depressions and
raised parts the plate may be held in a locking
device or press and the surfaces actually gripped
by the device or press may be protected by sheets
of rubber or the like.
The grooves in the standard mounting quota~
tion may for example be prepared in the follow
ing manner: a row of 48 point quads is locked in
a small chase with two pieces of steel perforating
rule on either side. A piece of steel perforating
rule 48 points wide is cut and the teeth are opened 30
to triangular points similar to a saw with a saw
grooves 6 lengthwise over its entire surface re
moving the metal. The grooves may suitably be
about one sixteenth of an inch deep leaving
?le. This section of rule is mounted in the end
of a piece of 48 point wood furniture and a satis
factory steel scraper to commence the formation
of the necessary grooves (about 8 to the inch) is
ridges of the original surface about one thirty
thus prepared.
second of an inch in width between each groove.
Two types of grooves are shown in Fig. 3, i. e.,
continuous grooves and discontinuous grooves.
quads forms a guide in which to run the scraper,
keeping it true in the grooves as they deepen.
The underside of the copper plate is provided
with a series of parallel chevron shaped depres
sions 2 and raised portions 3 across the width of
the plate to cross the grooves 6 in the base. The
chisel or tool used should produce the sharpest
45 and highest upturn on one side of the raised por
tion only. If desired additional depressions and
raised portions may be provided close to the edges
of the plate both along the length and width
thereof. Although not essential these additional
depressions and raised portions give additional
grip at the edges where printing pressure starts
The steel rule being above the
This simple tool will not ?nish the grooves but it
is very easy to ?nish them to a satisfactory depth All.)
with an ordinary graver, leaving the necessary
amount of original surface ridge to support the
plate.
The strip of harder metal, e. g. zinc, which is
interposed can be provided with depressions and
raised portions in the manner hereinbefore de
scribed.
If desired the plates may be provided with the
depressions and raised portions by casting.
If desired in setting up a composite base, indi 50.
vidual units such as quotations provided with
grooves or depressions are locked by pressure
and ?nishes on cylinder machines.
The base is now placed in position on a suitable
press and with good ?rm hard pressure the cop
per plate can be bedded into the grooved base
and/or with adhesives such as shellac against
similar units. Alternatively the individual units
surface to a level printing position whereby the
raised parts out into the metal of the base and
of soft metal provided with grooves can be simi—
the grooves take up the metal displaced as a
larly locked against units of harder metal having
raised portions on their vertical sides forming
indentations in the soft metal units when pres
result of the cutting action of the raised parts.
sure is applied.
The copper plate is now lifted from its bed and
both surfaces are coated with a layer of shellac
varnish or any other suitable cement. The plate
is then ?tted accurately into its bed on the base.
This can be effected without any trouble and
According to the invention the method of at
taching metal surfaces to other surfaces to pre
with another nip of pressure the plate is securely
mounted when dry against lift or movement in
any direction relative to. its base.
The grooves 6 in the base surface facilitate the
imparting of the requisite depressions and raised
parts to the base when the pressure is applied.
If desired in mounting the prepared plate on
its base, the base can be coated with shellac or
cement and the plate warmed and coated also
75 with shellac or cement pressed down level as one
60
vent relative movement as hereinbefore described
may be applied for ?xing plates on rotary print
ing cylinders with or without special jackets, sec
tions or hands to take portions or whole covering (i5
plates. The pressure required for ?xing the
plates on the base surface can be applied for in
stance by screw toggle clamps or plates or bands.
The invention offers many material advantages
in addition to those hereinbefore indicated, of 70
which the following are given by way of example.
(a) If engraved plates are delivered unmount
ed the mounting operations required are well
within the scope of small and average printing
plant equipment.
75
3
2,106,879
(1)) The plates can be more accurately mount
ed with ordinary labour than hitherto.
(0) Individual color plates can be more ac
curately adjusted to register.
(d) The process specially provides for the
needs of small blocks to be worked with loose
type formers.
(e) The process of mounting is not detrimen
tal to the systems which have their special
10 purposes but is supplementary, is a very sim
ple process which enables efficiency to be ob
tained without worry and risk and time wast
ing operation for it enables the operator to
obtain that much desired article “the ready to
15 print block”.
(f) Existing blocks on wood can be economi
cally remounted on metal by the printer or en
graver.
(g) The soft metal mounting units can be
20 separted and re-used for other sizes or as spac
ing material.
(it) The process does not prevent interlay
ing between plates but aims at dispensing with
the necessity of interlaying by providing more
25 rigid and level impression.
What I claim is:
'
1. A method of mounting metal printing proc
ess plates on bases of metal harder than the
metal of the plates, comprising securing an in
30 termediate plate of metal harder than the print
ing plate and provided with raised parts on its
upper surface to the base, providing the under
surface of the printing plate with depressions,
and pressing the printing plate down upon the
35 intermediate plate to cause the raised portions
of the intermediate plate to cut into the under
surface of the printing plate.
2. A method of mounting soft metal printing
process plates on soft metal bases, comprising
all) providing the upper surface of the base and the
under surface of the printing plate with de
pressions, interposing a plate of metal, harder
than the metal of the printing plate and the
base and provided with raised parts on its upper
and lower surfaces, between said printing plate
and base, and pressing said printing plate and
the base toward each other to force the raised
parts on the intermediate plate to cut into the
upper and lower surfaces of the base and print
ing plate, respectively.
3. A method of mounting metal printing proc
ess plates on a metal rotary printing cylinder
so as to prevent horizontal movement in any
direction, which consists in providing the print
10
ing plates on their lower surfaces with raised
parts and the cylinder with depressions, and
causing the raised parts to out into the cylinder
by the application of pressure, the depressions
serving to take up the displaced metal.
15
ll. A method of mounting metal printing proc
ess plates on metal bases made up of a plurality
of quotations locked together so as to prevent
horizontal movement in any direction, which
consists in providing the printing plates on their 20
lower surfaces with raised parts and‘the bases
with depressions, and causing the raised parts
to cut into the bases by the application of pres
sure, the depressions serving to take up the dis
25
placed metal.
5. A method of mounting metal printing proc
ess plates on a metal base so as to prevent hori
zontal movement in any direction, comprising
making the base of a plurality of quotations of
soft metal, providing the quotations with depres 30
sions in their side faces, interposing strips of
hard metal, provided with raised parts on the
faces thereof, between adjacent quotations, press
ing the quotations together to force the raised
parts on the strip of hard metal to cut into the
sides of the quotations, providing the printing
plates on their lower surface with raised parts
and the base of assembled quotations with de
pressions, and causing the raised parts to out
into the base of assembled quotations by the
application of pressure, the depressions serving
to take up the displaced metal.
EDWARD GEORGE NEWING.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
478 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа