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Патент USA US2106404

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Jan. ‘25, 1938. _
-w_ B_ EwmG
COMPOSITE PIPE
Filed June 25, 1954
2,106,404
Patented Jan. 25, 1938
.
.UNITED STATES
2,106,404
PATENT oFFlcEv
2,106,404
COMZPOSITE PIPE
Wylie B. Ewing, Wheeling, W. Va., assignor to
Wheeling Steel Corporation, Wheeling, W. Va.,
a corporation of Delaware
Application June 25, 1934, Serial No. 732,299
3 Claims. (Cl. 138-74)
This invention relates broadly to composite pipe member. The generally tubular metal member or
and the manufacture thereof, and. more particu
larly to the manufacture of pipe made up of a
plurality of pieces or members and adapted for
an use in a branched piping system. The invention
relates still more particularly to header pipe, such
as is used in gas ranges and the like, and the
manufacture thereof.
It is customary in certain piping installations,
10 such as in gas ranges, to provide a header pipe
blank may be of sheet metal, although for cer
tain purposes a seamless or cast blank may be
utilized and may have an opening formed in its
wall for reception of the auxiliary member. I
prefer, however, to utilize a blank having opposed
edge portions spaced apart and to connect be
tween such edge portions the auxiliary member
having means for attachment of va branch con
duit.
or conduit through which the incoming gas flows
,and to drill and tap such header pipe at intervals
for attachment of the burner connections. The
header pipe must have a substantial wall thick
ness in order that the thread tapped therein may
be of su?icient extent to maintain both a struc
invention will become apparent as the following
description of certain present preferred embodi
ments thereof proceeds.
In the accompanying drawing I have shown
certain present preferred embodiments of the
turally strong and a gas-tight joint. However,
invention, in which
if the entire header pipe wall is made of requisite
Figure 1 is a transverse cross-sectional per
spective view of a header pipe; and
Each of Figures 2, 3, and 4 is a transverse cross
sectional perspective view to enlarged scale of a
portion of a modi?ed form of header pipe.
thickness to insure mechanically strong gas-tight
threaded joints between the header pipe and the
burner connections the header pipe will be heavier
than necessary under the conditions of pressure
to which it is subjected, resulting in waste of
metal and unduly high cost of the installation.
To meet this problem it has heretofore been
proposed to provide seamless pipe with a longi
tudinally extending thickened wall portion adapt
ed to be tapped to receive the burner connec
tions. However, production of this seamless pipe
30 has entailed relatively high cost and other prob
lems have been encountered which have not been
satisfactorily solved.
In my Patent No. 2,086,125, I have disclosed and
claimed the production of header pipe out of a
?at blank or skelp having a portion or portions
of relatively great thickness and seaming or
welding together the edges of such blank or skelp
to form the pipe. Production of header pipe in
this manner has certain advantages rendering it
40 much more desirable than the prior methods.
However, under some circumstances it may not
be desirable to provide a blank or skelp of un
even thickness, and I have now devised a method
for accomplishing the same result in a different
45 and highly economical manner and which en
ables the use of sheet metal which may, if de
sired, be bent or formed. cold.
I provide a generally tubular metal member or
blank having an opening through its wall, and I
50 assemble with such member or blank at said
opening an auxiliary member having a portion or
provided with means for attachment of a branch
conduit and permanently connect said members
together in such manner as to permit subsequent
55 attachment of a branch conduit to the auxiliary
10
Other details, objects and advantages of the
‘
Referring more particularly to the drawing,
there is shown in Figure 1 a header pipe 2 formed
from a sheet metal blank 3 and an auxiliary or
insert member 4. The blank 3 is preferably a
flat elongated rectangular blank and it is prefer
ably bent or formed cold into generally tubular
form but with its opposed edges spaced some
what apart. The auxiliary or insert member 4
may be, for example, a cast or die formed mem
ber elongated in the direction of the length of
the blank 3 and having opposed ?anges 5 under
lying upper corner recesses 6.
The insert mem
ber is of substantial height having a downwardly
extending portion 1 of somewhat less width than
the upper portion. Such member is provided at
intervals longitudinally thereof with means for
attachment of a branch conduit. Such means in
the form shown in Figure 1 comprise screw
threads 8. The insert member may be drilled and
tapped at suitable intervals longitudinally there
of, the distance between the drillings being de
termined by the particular use to which the ?n
ished pipe is to be put. If, for example, such pipe
is to be used as a header for a gas range the drill
ings will be spaced a few inches apart.
After the blank 3 has been formed into sub
stantially tubular form but with its edges spaced
apart it is assembled with the insert member 4 as
shown in Figure l with the edges of the blank
received within the upper corner recesses 6 of
the insert member. The blank and insert'mem
her are preferably permanently connected to
gether, as by welding, as shown at 9. This not 55
2
2,106,404
only results in a structurally strong joint but
the blank 26. The member 28 is internally
also renders the joint gas-tight. The use of
such an insert member enables the wall or body
portion of the pipe to be made of relatively thin
threaded as at 30. It is preferably permanently
connected with the blank 26 by welding 3|. The
edges of the openings 21 may be spun outwardly
to provide a greater surface contact with the
member 28.
While I have shown and described certain
present preferred embodiments of the invention,
stock, such as sheet metal, and the insert mem
ber in fact strengthens and sti?‘ens the pipe.
Although the insert member may be connected
with the edges of the blank otherwise than by
welding, as, for example, by an interlocking
10 seam, the weld is preferred for the reasons above
stated.
The insert member may assume various differ
ent forms. For example, another form is shown
in Figure 2. In such ?gure there is shown a
15 portion of a sheet metal blank I0 formed into
generally tubular shape with opposed edges ll.
Adjacent each of such edges the blank is turned
inwardly to provide an inwardly projecting
?ange 12 extending substantially at right angles
to the surface of the blank adjacent thereto and
each of the ?anges I2 has a foot l3 turned in a
direction generally parallel to the outer surface
of the blank, such feet l3 extending toward one
another and cooperating with the ?anges [2 to
form a longitudinally extending pocket I4 in
which an auxiliary or insert member i5 is posi
tioned. The member l5 may be formed simi
larly to the member ll of Figure 1 but is of dif
ferent shape, being of generally rectangular
cross section and being provided at intervals with
threaded openings [6 for the attachment of
branch conduits. The member I5 preferably ?ts
snugly within the pocket 14 and has a down
wardly projecting reduced lower extremity I‘!
received between the inner faces of the feet [3.
This, however, is simply a detail of construction
and various other modi?cations may be em
ployed. The members l0 and I5 are preferably
welded together as shown at l8.
A somewhat different type of construction is
40
shown in Figure 3. In such ?gure there is
shown a portion IQ of a generally tubular metal
member or blank which may be of sheet metal or
of seamless or cast construction. The member
45
I9 is provided at intervals with openings 29, pref
erably of circular cross section, which may be
drilled if a seamless or cast blank is used, or
formed as opposite semi-circular recesses in the
opposite edges of the blank if a sheet metal
50 blank is used. In each of such openings there
is ?tted an auxiliary or insert member 2! which
it is to be distinctly understood that the same
is not limited thereto but may be otherwise vari 1O
ously embodied and practiced within the scope
of the following claims.
I claim:
1. A composite pipe comprising a generally
tubular member of relatively light construction 15
as. compared with thick-walled seamless tubes
of comparable size adapted to withstand high
pressures, said member having an opening
through the wall thereof and having a portion of
the material of said member at said opening 20
extending inwardly generally toward the axis'of
said member and an auxiliary member having‘
portions for attachmentof a plurality of branch
conduits and permanently connected with said
member at said opening and embraced by said 25
inwardly extending portion of the material of
said member whereby to permit subsequent at
tachment of branch conduits at said portions of
said auxiliary member.
2. A composite pipe comprising a generally tu 30
bular member of relatively light construction ‘as
compared with thick-walled seamless tubes of
comparable size adapted to withstand high pres
sures, said member having an elongated opening
through the wall thereof extending generally
parallel to the axis of said member and having a
portion of the material of said member at said
opening extending inwardly generally toward the
axis of said member and an elongated auxiliary
member having longitudinally spaced portions
for attachment of a plurality of branch conduits
and permanently connected with said member at
said opening and embraced by said inwardly ex
tending portion of the material of said member
whereby to permit subsequent attachment of a
plurality of spaced branch conduits at said
portions of said auin‘liary member.
3. A composite pipe comprising a generally
tubular member of relatively light construction
as compared with thick-walled seamless tubes ,.
of comparable size adapted to withstand high
pressures, said member having an elongated
?ts snugly within the opening and is provided
with a downwardly extending generally cylin
drical portion 22 internally threaded as at 23.
opening through the wall thereof extending gen
erally parallel to the axis of said member and
The member H has an outwardly projecting an
having a portion of the material of said member
nular ?ange 2d at its top, which ?ange overlies
the surface of the blank l9 around the opening
20. Each of the insert members 2| is preferably
toward the axis of said member and thence in
welded to the blank l9 as at 25.
A further modi?cation is shown in Figure 4.
In such ?gure there is shown a blank 26 which
may be similar to the blank IQ of Figure 3.
Such blank is provided at intervals with open
ings 2i in which are inserted tapered plug-like
65 members, one of which is shown at 28. Each of
the members 28 is inwardly tapered from top to
bottom so as to ?t by wedging engagement
within its opening 21. It is of such size that it
passes more than half Way but not entirely
70 through the opening, leaving a portion 29 ex
tending outwardly beyond the outer surface of
at said opening extending inwardly generally
wardly towardithe center of said opening to form
a seat, and an elongated auxiliary. member hav
ing longitudinally spaced threaded portions for
attachment of a plurality of branch conduits
and assembled with said member at said open
ing and embraced by said inwardly extending
portion’ of the material of said member and seat
ed on said seat whereby to- permit subsequent
attachment of a plurality of spaced branch con
duits at said threaded portions of said auxiliary
member, and means at the outer surface of said
generally tubular member permanently connect
ing said members together.
WYLIE B. EWING.
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