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Патент USA US2106409

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Jan. 25, 1938.
c. E. JENKINS
2,106,409
METHOD AND AK’PARATUS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF
JUICES FROM VEGETABLE PUL-P AND THE LIKE
Filed Sept. 26, 193l_
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
Jan- 25, 1938.
c. E. JENKINS
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF‘
JUICES FROM VEGETABLE PULP AND THE LIKE
Filed Sept
26, 1931
2,106,409
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR
Jan. 25, 1938.
,
c. E. JENKINS
2,106,409
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF
JUICES FROM VEGETABLE PULP AND THE um:
Filed Sept. 26, 1931
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IN VENTOR
Jan. 25, 1938.
c. E. JENKINS
'
2,106,409
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF
JUICES FROM VEGETABLE PULP AND THE LIKE
Filed Sept. 26, 1931
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
' 2,106,409
UNITED ‘STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,106,409
METHOD m APPARATUS FOR THE-EX
TRACTION OF JUICES FROM VEGETABLE
PULP AND THE LIKE
.
Clarence E. Jenkins, Keene, N. 11., asalgnor, by
direct and mesne assignments, to 1300i! Cor
poration, trustee, Pittsburgh, Pa, a corpora
tion of Delaware
Application September 26, 1931,
No. 565,274
83 Claims. (Cl. 100-37)
Figure 2 is a similar view showing‘a develop
The present invention pertains to the art of
dehydrating, and relates more particularLv to ment of the arrangement disclosed in Figure 1
the extraction of juices from vegetable pulp and operating in accordance with the preferred
principle of my invention;
and like materials.
_
. The invention will be particularly described
for the extraction of fruit juice from fruits and
special reference will be made to the extraction
of juice from apples, to which the invention ?nds
particular commercial application, but it will be
10 understood that this is merely by way of illus
tration.
It has heretofore been proposed to extract
water or juice by the use of a travelling ?lter
band and also to dehydrate by subjecting the
15 material to a centrifuging action.
Figure 3-is a diagram similar to Figs-1 and 2 '
showing still another modi?cation of the in
vention;
_
.
Figure 4 is a side elevation of a machineof
portable size embodying my invention;
Figure 5 is a top plan view of the machine 10
shown in Figure 4;
Figure 6 is a view partly in section and partly
in elevation showing the interior construction of
the machine;
Figure '7 is a transverse horizontal section in 15
the plane of line VII-VIE of Figure 6, with the
template e?ecting extraction by simultaneously cover and its attached mechanism removed but
using a travelling ?lter band and a centrifuge. , with the position of the parts indicated in dotted
Moreover, the invention contemplates a method lines;
‘
Figure 8 is a bottom plan view of the cover 20
20 and apparatus according to which the pulp or
other material is subjected to a number of press
with its attached mechanism, but with the larger
ing and centrifuging operations over the same pulley omitted and with the belt removed;
'
Figure 9 is a detail view showing the construc
pressing surfaces, but is re-adjusted and agitated
following each centrifuging and squeezing op
tion of the belt;
Figure 10 is a detail sectional view through the‘ 25
eration.
In practicing the invention the more moist larger pulley, the view being also in the plane of
particles are thrown against the drier particles line VIL-VII of Figure 6, but being on a larger
and this operation is used largely to assist in scale;
Figure 11 is a perspective view of the juice col
effecting the ?nal separation of the fresh and
In the practice. of the present invention I con
30
partially dehydrated pulp from the substantially
dry pulp-
While the invention is not particularly limited
as to its size and capacity, I provide a unit which
is su?iciently small to be portable and which can
conveniently be used in soda fountains, beverage
stands and like places where it is desired to dis
pense freshly extracted fruit juice as a beverage.
I have found when certain fruits, as for in
stance, an apple is cut up, the juice can be most
40
lecting trough;
Figure 12 is a detail side elevation of the frut
.
freely extracted immediately following the cut
ting of the fruit cells. If extraction is not ef
holding hopper;
30
'
Figure 13 is a top plan view of the part shown
in Figure 12; and
>
Figure 14 is a sectional view through a modi
?ed form of device.
35
Referring ?rst to Figure 1, there is shown
more or less diagrammatically an apparatus
comprising spaced apart pulleys 2 and 3, one of
which may be positively driven from a motor or 40
other source of-power, not shown. The pulleys
may be assumed to rotate in‘ the direction of the
fected immediately, the pulp tends to re-absorb
the juice, the walls of the ruptured cells either arrows, and for the purpose of illustration it may
collapse to retain the juice, or the pectin in the be assumed that their axes are vertical and the
fruit tends to form a jelly which seals the cells. view therefore a top plan view. Passing around 45
With the present invention the juice is ex
the periphery of the pulleys 2 and 3 is a con
tracted under conditions most favorable for its tinuous belt I. This belt, as shown in Figure 9,
removal and before the pulp has aged to an ex preferably comprises a layer of coarsely woven
tent where the extraction is repeated.
fabric which is fairly coarse and through which
The invention may be readily understood by air will easily permeate. Inside of this web of 50
reference to the accompanying drawings in coarse fabric, designated 5, is a layer of very
which
55
'
?nely woven fabric 6.
-
Figure 1 is a more or less diagrammatic view
of an apparatus embodying one principle of my
Enclosing, or partly enclosing this unit, is
juice collecting trough ‘I having a vertical side
invention;
wall and a trough-like bottom 9, and there is a 55
2
2,100,409
spout at in toward which the bottom trough
slopes for the discharge of ?uidtherefrom.
Assuming that the machine operates to rotate
the pulleys in the direction of the arrows, the
belt of course serves to transmit motion from
one pulley to the other. The fruit, such as an
apple, can be fed into the space where the belt
4 engages the pulley 2. I have indicated the
fruit at this point by the circle at A. The fruit
10 is gripped and carried under the belt around the
periphery of the pulley 2. This serves to crush
the fruit and the juice which is extracted from
this crushing of the fruit is thrown off centrifu
gally against the vertical ?ange ‘I of the trough
15 member, gravitating down into the trough 9.
The juice is forced through the belt, which serves
to ?lter the juice. It may be assumed that as
soon as one apple is crushed another is fed into
the machine, so that the apples are crushed as
20 fast as they are delivered to the machine.
At
the point where the belt 4 leaves the pulley 2
the wettest pulp will cling to the belt 4 because
of the greater capillary attraction, while the dry
pulp tends to adhere more closely to the metal
25 surface of the pulley 2. This results in a large
mass of pulp being thrown tangentially from the
surface of the pulley 2 into the space between the
two pulleys. The pulp which clings to the belt 4
in that reach of the belt travelling from the pul
30 ley 2 to the pulley 3 is carried around the periph
ery of the pulley 3 and again squeezed and cen
trifuged. The pulp which goes around the sur
face of the pulley 3 will either cling to the belt
or be thrown off tangentially into the space be
tween the two pulleys. I have indicated in
dotted lines how the pulp is thrown into this
space in two directions.
-
The opposed streams. of pulp, in traversing the
space between the two pulleys, collide with other
particles coming from the opposite direction, as
plainly indicated by the dotted lines, and the
heavier, more moist particles de?ect the lighter
more completely dehydrated particles. The
pulp which traverses its course impinges against
the surrounding moving parts, i. e., both the belt
and the peripheries of the pulleys, where they
tend to adhere and are carried around the pe
riphery of one or the other pulleys again. This
cycle repeats itself. many times in a minute and
the space between the two pulleys is ?lled with
the rapidly ?ying particles of pulp colliding with
each other and the surrounding moving struc
tures. The effect of this is to gradually work the
driest particles toward the edge of the belt from
which they are eventually discharged below the
bottom of the trough element 1. It will be re
called that fresh pulp is fed into the machine
all the time so that the same belt is carrying a
mass of pulp which has been crushed to different
60 degrees, some of it of course being freshly
crushed pulp, while the other has been crushed
two or more times.
The ?ying off of the par
ticles through the space between the two pul
leys produces a condition where the pulp, in
stead of stratifying on the belt, is continuously
stirred up and re-arranged, with the drier pulp
always working toward the edge of the belt,
usually working down because of the in?uence of
gravity.
70
By reason of the fact that the pulp is cen
trifuged as soon as the fruit is crushed, and by
reason of the fact that the pulp is subjected to a
large number of centrifuging operations in the
course of a minute, with the agitation and re-ar
75 rangement of the pulp on the belt constantly
taking place, the machine extracts a very high
percentage of liquid from the original mass and
the pulp which is gradually worked of! the belt
is well dehydrated.
It is desirable, in order to get the collision of
the particles in the space between the pulleys 2
and 2, that the spacing of the pulleys be properly
proportioned to their size and to the speed at
which the pulleys are operated.
With the arrangement shown in Figure 1 prac
ticaiiy all of the dry pulp is thrown o? cen
trifugally from the peripheries of the wheels 2
and 3, but if the belt is operated at a lower speed
some of the pulp tends to cling to the periphery
of the pulleys 2 and 3, and if this occurs a scraper
may be used for keeping the surface of the pul
leys free.
The arrangement shown in Figure 1 is best
adapted for large installations, but for smaller
installations where it is not possible or conven 20
ient to crush the whole apple between the pul
ley and the belt, some arangement such as that
shown in Figure 2 is preferred. In Figure 2
there are shown two pulleys l2 and IS, the pul
lzy i3 representing the driving pulley and being
considerably less in diameter than the other pull
ley i2. The interior of the pulley I2 is hollow
and is provided with a,horizontal plate i4 having
grating teeth for disintegrating the fruit. This
pulley has slots IS in its periphery. Passing
around the two pulleys is a belt l6 similar to the
one hereinbefore described and as shown in Fig. 9.
With this type of machine the fruit is fed to
the interior of the pulley l2 where it is grated
or rasped on the rotating plate or disc l4. Since 35
the juice ?ows most readily from an apple or
similar fruit immediately following the cutting,
it will be apparent that the centrifuging action
of the rotating disc l4 will serve to throw the
freshly cut pulp and the juice which runs out of .
the fruit through the peripheral openings ii in
the pulley i2. Most of this juice and pulp will
pass through the slots l5 directly onto the sur
face of the travelling belt.
At I1 is a juice col
lecting trough similar to the juice collector ‘I
mentioned in connection with Figure 1. The
juice which is thrown from the interior of the
pulley l2 through the slots in the periphery
thereof against the belt I6 is thrown by centrif
ugal action into the juice receiver I'I. Some of 50
the juice of course will be thrown out of that
portion of the periphery of i2 which is not cov
ered by the belt, but it impinges against the belt
and pulley i3. Likewise, the pulp is thrown vio
lently by centrifugal action through the slots
against the belt and the impact of the pulp to
ward the belt tends toward breaking up the pulp
and the extraction of juice therefrom, the pulp
of course being centrifuged. The fresh pulp
thrown out through the slots in the periphery of 60
the pulley i2 adheres for the most part to the
belt and is carried around the pulley l3 where
it is further squeezed and simultaneously centri
fuged.
The pulley l3 in the arrangement shown in
Fig. 2 is preferably the driving pulley. The pres
ence of the pulp between the pulley i3 and the
belt i6 tends to produce a certain amount of slip
and this tends to prevent pulp from adhering
to the pulley l3 at all. Some of the pulp clings 70
to the belt i6 while some of it is thrown at a
high velocity into the space between the two
pulleys, as indicated by the dotted lines, and it
meets with the pulp thrown oil.’ and out of the
larger pulley l2, as described in connection with
2,106,409
Fig. 1, and the collision of the particles with one
another and the surrounding moving parts, tend
ing to de?ect the lighter particles more than
the heavier particles, together with gravity, tends
eventually to cause the light dry particles to be
worked o? the belt.
-
r
' As previously stated, the more moist pulp tends
to cling to the belt while the drier pulp tends to
adhere to the periphery of the pulley t2. If
10 the machine is operated at a su?lciently high
speed practically all of the pulp which tends to
adhere to the pulley l2 will be thrown off into
the space between the two pulleys and separation
will be effected in the manner previously de
scribed, but in order that the machine need not
be run at such a high speed, I may use a scraper
in the form of a pin l8 adjacent to but pref
erably spaced slightly from the periphery of the
pulley l2 for scraping o? the dry particles; The
20 dry particles thus scraped 011 the periphery drop
down by gravity. I have found that the pin acts
most effectively to remove the smooth pieces of
fruit skin from the periphery of the pulley when
it is spaced a slight distance from the periphery
25 because of the fact that very small pulp particles
are retained on the surface of the pulley and
these small particles adhere to those pieces of
skin which otherwise cling to the belt with the
smooth surface toward the pulley, thus pulling
such skin particles off the belt and carrying them
around with the pulley to the scraping pin.
Under some circumstances it is desirable to
facilitate the release of ?brous material from the
belt. For instance, if the machine is used for
35 extracting juice from‘ pineapple pulp and the
pineapples are not ?rst peeled, the hard hull
40
4.5
50
60
70
3
underside of the cover is apin or shaft 35 on
which is mounted a second large pulley member
38. The pulley member 38 comprises a hub por
tion 39 having a bushing 40 and a horizontal web
4|. Secured to the periphery of this web is a
vertical ?ange 42 and the ?ange has a number
of peripheral slots 43 therein, the width of which
is relatively narrow as compared to the total
width of the ?ange 42 and the bottoms of the
slots 43 are ?ush with the top of the web 4|.‘ On 10'
the top of the horizontal webv 4| are a plurality
of rasps or teeth 44, the preferred arrangement
of which is shown in Figure 10, these rasps or
teeth being arranged in spirals so that each suc
ceeding tooth 44 in a spiral will begin to out 15
where the preceding one left off, so that the
apple or other fruit being reduced is sliced or
cut by the rasps from the outside toward the
center in a regular manner. Projecting through
the cover 21 is a fruit hopper 45. I have shown 20
this hopper as being semi-circular whenv viewed
from the top in order to receive half of an apple
at a-time. The bottom of the hopper 45 ter
minates above the teeth or rasps 44 on the web
4|. The hopper has a horizontal plate-like ex 25
tension 46 on the bottom thereof, as clearly
shown in Figs. 12 and 13, which has the double
function of serving to hold detached fruit par
ticles from ?ying'up inside the pulley and which
also serves to catch any particles which are 30
thrown from pulley 34 and/or the belt, back
through the slots 43 and for this purpose it has
a very slight curvature as shown in Figure 12.
Passing around the peripheries of the pulleys
34 and 38 is a belt 41 which is of the two-ply 35
construction .hereinbefore described and which
tends to adhere to the belt. In this case the ar- _ is shown in detail in Fig. 9. This belt is under
rangement shown in Figure 3 is employed. This tension, and ‘the purpose of having the motor
arrangement is substantially the same as that with its pulley 34 movable in a slight arc through
described in connection with Figures 1 and 2, but the action of the spring 32 is to keep this belt
a third idler pulley 20 is interposed between the under tension, but allow it to yield slightly under 40
two main pulleys 2i and 22 so that the belt 23 excessive strain, as when‘a considerable mass of
is given- a reverse curve and the passage of the pulp is con?ned between the surface of the belt
belt around the idler pulley serves to dislodge and the pulleys.
substances that cling to the belt.
Set into the top of the receptacle or shell 25
With this explanation of the general method, in such manner as it- can be readily removed 45
the adaptation of the commercial embodiment in therefrom is a juice collecting trough 48 com;
a speci?c form of apparatus may now be de
prising a single piece of sheet metal bent to the
scribed. Such a commercial embodiment is illus
contour of a portion of the periphery of the pul
trated in Figures 4 to 15, inclusive, and follows leys 34 and 38 and having an intermediate por
the general scheme described in connection with tion extending along one reach of the belt. This 50
Figure 2.
member comprises a main side plate 49 having
The machine, when constructed as a portable an inwardly turned top ?ange 50 and a trough
unit for use at soda fountains, refreshment like portion 5| at the bottom. The bottom of
stands and the like, preferably comprises a hol
the trough 5| is sloped from each end toward a
low base member or casing 25 having a rubber discharge spout 52 projecting through a slot 53 65
pad 26 on its base, both to hold the machine in the side of the shell 25. This juice collector
against slipping and to reduce the noise from has a minimum clearance on the belt, and is re
the operation of the machine. Fitted onto the movably retained on the inside of the shell 25
top of the casing is a removable cover member by means of the clips 54.
60
21 on which is mounted a small electric motor
There is a vertically depending pin 55 secured
28. This motor is secured to the top of the cover to the inside of the cover 21 in the space between
by means of a screw or bolt 29 which provides a the 'two pulleys 34 and-38 and so positioned as
pivot about which the motor has a limited move
to approximate the periphery of the ?ange 42
ment. As shown in Figure 8, the cover 21 has of the pulley 38. This pin is located near the 65
an arcuate slot 3 therein, and a pin or bolt 3|
point where the belt leaves the pulley, and pro
carried on the motor base projects through this vides the scraper element heretofore described in
slot for limiting the arcuate movement of the connection with Figure 2.
'
motor. Between the base of the motor and the
In the operation of the particular machine
top of the cover is a spring 32 which tends to shown, the apple from which the juice is to be
move the motor about its pivot in the direction extracted is ?rst ,cut in half andya half of the 70
of the arrow shown in Figure 8.
.
The motor has a spindle 33 that projects
through a slot in the cover 21 and to whichv is
75 secured a ?ange belt pulley 34. Mounted 'on the
apple put in the hopper 45. The machine should
be operating when the apple is put into the hop
per, andfor holding the apple down against the
grating disc 4| a wooden plug 56 may be em
75
4
ployed, this plug being so constructed that it can
not be forced into the hopper far enough to come
against the grating disc. The grating elements
or rasps l4 rapidly tear of! small pieces-of the
apple, allowing some of the juice to immediately
nates a hollow shell or container having a re
movable cover II. The cover It supports a fruit
run out of the ruptured cells.
cover and having a disc ‘I at the lower end
thereof. This disc has an upstanding ?ange 63
This juice and
pulp is thrown violently outward by centrifugal
action, discharging with 'a considerable impact
against the belt. This impacting of the pulp
against the belt serves further to force some of
the juice from the pulp into the belt, and as the
hopper ll similar to the member ll shown in
Fig. 12. Also carried on the top Cl is a motor
‘I having a shaft Oi passing down through the
which preferably ‘slopes upwardly and inwardly
and there are passages 04 through the disc im
mediately inside this ?ange. The area of the 10
disc within the ?ange is roughened or rasped for
belt travels around the pulley 18 the juice is
thrown off centrifugally into the receiver 48.
The pulp, of course, cannot go through the belt,
disintegrating fruit.
described in connection with Fig. 2, thus causing
the ?ange revolves, the pulp is also squeezed by
.
The disc 62 is provided with a depending ?ange
65, the middle portion of which is perforated with
but tends to form in a central ridge on the belt very small holes. Surrounding the ?ange 85 and 15
by reason of the fact that the slots 43 are at‘ suitably supported within the receptacle 5‘! is an
about the' center of the belt. The fresh pulp, annular juice receiving trough i6 and a discharge
being full or juice, adheres to the belt and is pipe 61. The cover 58 carries an inverted bracket
carried around the pulley u where it is pressed arm 68, the inner end of which is turned up inside
and more juice centrifuged into the other end the ?ange 65 and carries a roller 69 which bears 20
of the trough “.1 As previously explained, when against the inner surface of the ?ange 65; or is
the belt leaves the pulley 3|, the pulleys and belt spaced only a very slight. distance away from the
travelling in the direction of the arrow shown
In operation, the fruit is put into the hopper 59
in Figure 7, much of the pulp will be dislodged
due to the fact that there is a slippage between and is disintegrated by the rasps on the disc 82 25
the driving pulley and the belt caused by the and thrown out centrifugally against the ?ange
presence of pulp and this pulp will spray out into 63, and the slope of the ?ange directs the juice
the space between the pulleys and encounter and pulp through the openings 84 against the
other pulp thrown off the periphery of the larger downwardlyturned ?ange 85. The pulp adheres
pulleys and also the enclosing moving parts, as to the revolving ?ange 85 and is centrifuged. As 30
a continuous agitation and stirring up of the
pulp by reason of which the drier pulp is worked
toward the edges, particularly the lower edge of
the belt, and all of the pulp is subjected to many
pressing and centrifuging operations around the
peripheries oi the two pulleys. The dry pulp
which tends to accumulate on the surface of the
pulley on the periphery of the ?ange 42 is re
40 moved by the scraper pin II. The shell 2| pro
vides a collector into which the dehydrated pulp
eventually falls, and this collector is of sui?cient
capacity to hold the pulp of a great many apples.
While a detailed description of the operation
. of the machine requires considerable space for
its explanation, the machine actually functions
at high speed and the half of an apple is disin
tegrated and dehydrated in but a few seconds.
Just as soon as one piece of apple has been de
hydrated, another piece may be fed into the hop
the roller ‘9 so that the squeezing and centrifug
ing occurs simultaneously. The roller 69 is of
course driven frictionally. Some of the pulp is
picked up by the roller 69 and thrown off into the
space inside the revolving member, where some of
it redeposits for further centrifuging, and other
pulp, because it is dry, does not adhere but drops
down into the receptacle 51. The juice of course
is thrown'into the collector 66, from whence it is 40
discharged through the spout 61.
.
With either type of machine, the pulp is formed
into an endless procession on a travelling ?lter
member and is simultaneously squeezed and
centrifuged during a portion of its travel and in 45
each the drier pulp is discharged by reason of its
lower adhesion to the surrounding moving parts.
As previously mentioned, the machine shown
represents a practical embodiment of an appara
tus for practicing my invention in small units
suitable forv soda fountains, beverage stands and
the like, but it will be understood that this is
merely by way of illustration and that various
con?ned atmosphere, the extracted juice will re
tain the bouquet and ?avor of the original apple other embodiments of the invention are contem
plated within the scope of the following claims.
whereby the juice makes a pleasing and desir
I claim:
able beverage, lighter in color than the familiar
1. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
cider where considerable oxidation of the juice
pulp or the like comprising a pair of pulleys hav
has taken place, and where the bouquet and dis
tinctive ?avor of the original apple is entirely ing their axes vertical, 9, single belt passing
around the pulleys, said single belt and pulleys 60
(34) lost.
The machine can be easily cleaned at the end constituting the entire pulp pressing and convey
ing means, means for introducing pulp from
of a day's run by squirting water into the hop
per 45 while the machine is running, the water which juice is to be extracted to the inner surface
of the belt by impact, and a juice collector ex
?ushing out the machine and dislodging accu
tending along the belt in a position to receive
mulated particles. It is usually desirable to re
move the belt " entirely. and replace it with a the juice thrown off the belt, and driving means
fresh one. An important advantage of the belt for the belt.
2. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
is that because the‘ fine layer is over a coarse
layer of fabric, air can readily permeate between pulp or the like comprising a pair of pulleys, a
the two layers of fabric. This tends to break up belt passing around the pulleys, means for in 70
troducing pulp from which juice is to be extracted
and relieve suction which tends to hold the par
ticles to the belt if the pulp is thrown against a to the inner surface of the belt, a juice collector
extending along the belt in a position to receive
smooth surface fabric.
the juice thrown off the belt, and driving means
The modi?cation disclosed in Fig. 14 repre
for the belt, the axes of the pulleys being in a 75
75 sents a simpli?ed unit. In this ?gure 51 desig
per, and the machine run continuously. Since
the extraction is effected very rapidly and in a
5
2,106,409
substantially vertical plane and the belt being
substantially edgewise to a horizontal plane, said
juice collector comprisinga vertical plate ex
tending along the belt and having a trough por
tion thereon adjacent the lower edge of the belt.
3. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
pulp or the like comprising a pair of pulleys, a
belt passing around the pulleys, means for in
troducing pulp from which juice is to be extracted
10 to the inner surface of the belt, a juice collector
extending along the belt in a position to receive
the juice thrown off the belt, and driving means
.for the belt, the axes of the pulleys being in a
substantially vertical plane and the belt being
15 substantially edgewise to a horizontal plane, said
juice collector comprising a vertical plate having
a trough portion thereonadjacent the lower edge
of the belt, the top of the trough being above the
lower edge of the belt whereby the dry ‘pulp dis
way around the pulleys and so positioned as to
receive juice which is thrown off centriiugally
through the belt, said pulleys having vertical
axes and the belt being substantially edgewise to
a horizontal plane, the hollow pulley having a
horizontal web therein, the top of which is in
the plane of the openings through the periphery
of said hollow pulley, the openings and the web
being in a plane intermediate the top and bottom
edges of the belt whereby material is thrown
through the openings centrifugally against the 10
belt between its upper and lower edges, said web
having rasping elements thereon for disintegrat
ing material from which the juice is to be ex
tracted.
I
.
15
apart pulleys, one of said pulleys being hollow
25 and having a web portion therein and having
openings through the side walls thereof above the
web portion, a belt passing around the pulleys and
8. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
fruitor the like comprising a pair of pulleys, one
of which is hollow and has peripheral openings
through the side walls thereof, said openings be
ing intermediate the edges of the pulley, a belt 20
passing around the pulleys, said hollow pulley
‘having a web therein located in substantially the
plane of the openings through the periphery of
the pulley, rasping elements on the web, and a
fruit holding hopper projecting into the hollow 25
pulley and terminating in proximity to the web.
9. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
enclosing the space between them, means for
introducing material from which juice is to be ex—
30 tracted into the hollow pulley, means for driving
fruit or the like comprising a pair of pulleys, one
of which is hollow and has peripheral openings
through the side walls thereof, said openings be- _ 30
20 charged from the lower edge of the belt will not be
thrown into the trough.
4. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
pulp or the like comprising at least two spaced
one of the pulleys, and a juice collector extending
along the belt in one reach between the pulleys
and extending at least part way around the pe_
ing intermediate the edges of the pulley, a belt
passing around the pulleys,_said hollow pulley
ripheries of the pulleys.
5. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
35
pulp or the like comprising at least two spaced
apart pulleys, one of which is hollow and has
peripheral openings through the side walls there
of the pulley, rasping elements on the web, and
a fruit holding hopper projecting into the hol
of, a, belt passing over the peripheries of the pul
40 leys and enclosing the space between them, means
for introducing material from which juice is to be
extracted to the interior of the hollow pulley, and
a juice collector outside the belt and curved part
way around the pulleys and so positioned as to re
45 ceive juice which is thrown o? centrifugally
through the belt.
6. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
pulp or the like comprising at least two spaced
apart pulleys, one of which is hollow and has
50 peripheral openings through the side walls there
of, a belt passing over the peripheries of the
pulleys and enclosing the space between them,
means for introducing material from which juice
is to be extracted to the interior of the hollow
55 pulley, and a juice collector outside the belt and
curved part way around the pulleys and so posi
tioned as to receive juice which is thrown o?
centrifugally through the belt, said pulleys hav
ing vertical axes and the belt being substantial
ly edgewise to a horizontal plane, the hollow
pulley having a horizontal web therein, the top of
which is in the plane of the openings through the
periphery of said hollow pulley, the openings and
the web being in a plane intermediate the top and
65 bottom edges of the belt whereby material is
thrown through the openings centrifugally against
the belt between its upper and lower edges.
7. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
pulp or the like comprising at least two pulleys,
70 one of which is hollow and has peripheral openings
through the side walls thereof, a belt passing over
the peripheries of the pulleys, means for intro
ducing material from which juice is to be ex
tracted to the interior of the hollow pulley, and
75 a juice collector outside the belt and curved part
having a web therein located in substantially the
plane of the openings through the periphery
low pulley and terminating in proximity to the
web, said hopper having a plate thereon extending
over a portion of the web at one side of the hop- -
per, said plate being spaced a slight distance away 40
from the web.
10. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
fruit or the like comprising a pair of pulleys, one
of which is hollow and has peripheral openings
through the side walls thereof, said openings be
ing intermediate the edges of the pulley, a belt 45
passing around the pulleys, said hollow pulley
having a web therein located in substantially the
plane of the openings through the periphery of
the pulley, rasping elements on the web, a fruit
holding hopper projecting into the hollow pulley 50
and terminating in proximity to the web, said
hopper having a plate thereon extending over a
portion of the web at one side of the hopper, said
plate being spaced a slight distance away from 55
the web, means for driving-the other pulley, and
a juice collector extending along, the belt and
at least partially encircling the peripheries of the
pulleys, the juice collector being spaced from the
belt.
60
11. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
fruit or the like comprising a pair of pulleys, one
of which is hollow and has peripheral openings
through the side walls thereof, said openings
being intermediate the edges of the pulley, a belt 65
passing around the pulleys, said hollow pulley
having a web therein located in substantially the
plane of the openings through the periphery of
the pulley, rasping elements on the Web, a fruit
holding hopper projecting into the hollow pulley 70
and terminating in proximity to the web, said '
hopper having a plate thereon extending over a
portion of the web at one side of the hopper, said
plate being spaced a slight distance away from
the web, means for driving the other pulley, and 76
6
2,106,409
a juice collector extending along the belt and at
least partially encircling the peripheries of the
pulleys, the juice collector being spaced from the
belt, the driving pulley being of considerably
smaller diameter than the hollow pulley.
12. A machine of the class described compris
ing two pulleys, a pressing and filter belt passing
around the pulleys, the space between the pulleys
and the opposite reaches of the belt being open
10 and unobstructed, means for introducing pulp to
lower end to permit the free discharge of pulp
the inner surface of the belt, and a juice collector
force from the outside of the disc member to
the interior of the drum-like member, said disc
member having means thereon for disintegrating
fruit or the like, stationary means for retaining
fruit in position to be disintegrated, and a ?ange
on the disc-like member for directing pulp under
action of centrifugal ‘force to the openings in
said disc-like member.
at the exterior of the belt at least partially
encircling the pulleys and extending along one
reach of the belt intermediate .zhe pulleys.
13. A machine of the class d‘scribed compris
15
ing two pulleys having vertical axes, a pressing
and ?lter belt passing around the pulleys, means
for introducing pulp to the inner surface of the
belt, and a juice collector at the exterior of the
20 belt at least partially encircling the pulleys, the
pulleys being spaced and the reaches of the belt
being spaced, there being an open space between
the pulleys and the opposite reaches of the belt,
and means for driving the pulleys and belt at such
speed that pulp is thrown into the space between
the pulleys in opposite directions across the space
and the‘ pulp particles caused to collide.
14. A machine of the class described compris
ing at least two pulleys having vertical axes, a
80 pressing and ?lter belt passing around the pul
leys and disposed edgewise to a horizontal plane,
means for introducing the pulp to the inner sur
face of the belt, a juice collector at the exterior of
the belt extending along one reach of the belt
and at least partially around the pulleys, and a
member adjacent the periphery of one of the
pulleys at a point where the periphery-of such
_ pulley is clear of the belt for removing particles
adhering to the periphery of said pulley.
15. A machine of the class described compris
40
ing at least two pulleys having vertical axes, a
pressing and ?lter belt passing around the pul
leys and disposed edgewise to a horizontal plane,
means for introducing the pulp to the inner sur
.45 face of the belt, a juice collector at the exterior
of the belt extending along one reach of the belt
and at least partially around the pulleys, and a
member adjacent the periphery of one of the
pulleys at a point where the periphery of such
50 pulley is clear of the belt for removing particles
adhering to the periphery of said pulley, said
member being spaced a slight distance away from
said pulley.
16. Apparatus of the class described comprising
55 ‘a drum-like member having its axis vertical,
60
65
70
75
means for rotating the drum-like member about
its vertical axis, said member being open at its
lower end to permit the free discharge of pulp
therefrom, said member having a perforate pe
ripheral side portion through which juice may
pass, a roller inside the drum closely adjacent
the peripheral side portion thereof and of less
diameter than the interior of ‘the drum, and a
juice collector surrounding the drum-like mem
ber, said drum-like member also having a disc
portion, the disc portion having openings there
through through which pulp may pass and means
for de?ecting the pulp through said openings
under centrifugal force from the outside of the
disc member to the interior of the drum-like
member.
17. Apparatus of the class described compris
ing a drum-like member having its axis vertical,
means for rotating the drum-like member about
its vertical axis, said member being open at its
therefrom, said member having a perforate pe
ripheral side portion through which juice may
pass, a roller inside the drum closely adjacent the
peripheral side portion thereof and of less diame
ter than the interior of the drum, and a juice
collector surrounding the drum-like member, said
drum-like member also having a disc portion.
the disc portion having openings therethrough
through which pulp may pass under centrifugal 10
18. The method of extracting juice from fruit
which comprises reducing fruit to pulp, taking 20
the pulp immediately as it is formed and instan
taneously discharging it into an endless proces
sion of pulp in various stages of dehydration and
simultaneously centrifuging and pressing the pulp
in said procession, removing part of said pulp 25
from said procession and returning it to the pro
cession at a different position while the squeezing
and centrifuging operation continues.
19. The method of extracting juice from pulp
which comprises forming and continuously sup 30
plying pulp to an endless strip or procession posi
tioned edgewise to a horizontal plane, simultane
ously centrifuging and pressing said strip or pro
cession, and permanently removing part of said
pulp from said strip or processionby the diifer 35
ence in adhesion between the wet pulp and the
dry pulp.
20. A machine of the class described compris
ing two pulleys, a pressing and ?ltering belt pass
ing around the two pulleys, means for intro 40
ducing pulp to the inner surface of said belt, and
means engaging one reach of the belt between
the two pulleys for de?ecting it from a line tan
gential to said two pulleys to thereby cause pulp
adhering to the belt to be thrown clear of the belt 45
at such point of deflection, one of said two pul
leys being larger than the other, said means being
so positioned that the pulp which is thrown clear
moves in a direction toward the larger pulley,
and means for driving the belt and pulleys at
high speed.
21. The method of extracting juice from pulp
or the like, which comprises continuously throw
ing and rethrowing the pulp against a moving
foraminous member, and subjecting the pulp and 55
foraminous member to a centrifuging step after
the pulp has been thrown against said member
and while it is adhering thereto, and withdrawing
pulp particles which fail to reach or adhere to the
moving foraminous member when they are
thrown toward said member.
22. The method of extracting juice from pulp
or the like, which comprises continuously throw
ing and rethrowing the pulp against a moving
foraminous member, subjecting the pulp and
foraminous member to a centrifuging step after
the pulp has been thrown against said member
and while it is adhering thereto, withdrawing the
pulp particles which fail to reach or adhere to
the moving foraminous member when they are 70
thrown toward said member, and continuously
mingling fresh pulp with pulp that has been
thrown and centrifuged one or more times.
23. The method of extracting juice from‘ pulp
or the like, which comprises throwing and re 75
7
2, 106,409
throwing pulp against a foraminous surface, able ?lter band disposed edgewise to a horizontal
pressing the pulp against the surface and cen
plane and movable through a curved path and
trifugally removing the juice which is pressed being open at its lower end, means for driving
into the surface.
24. An apparatus of the class described, com
prising a belt-like member, a pair of spaced-apart
pulleys about which said member is trained, one
of said pulleys being adapted to introduce material against the inner surface of the belt," and
10 means to de?ect one reach of the belt from a
straight path between the two pulleys whereby
the material on the belt is thrown clear thereof,
means for driving the belt and the pulleys at high
speed, the space between the opposite reaches of
15 the belt being open.
25. The method of extracting juice from pulp,
which comprises continuously throwing pulp
particles through space against a foraminous
member, subjecting the particles to pressure
20 while they are held against the member and then
rethrowing the particles against the member, and
said band, means for delivering comminuted fruit
pulp or the like against the inner face of said
band, said driving means being arranged to move
the band at a speed sufficient to normally hold
the pulp delivered to the hand against the inner
face of the band, a roller eccentrically positioned
inside the band and being arranged to press pulp 10
carried around on the inner face of the band, a
?xed support for said roller, said roller'constitut-_
ing the sole mechanical means cooperating with
the ?lter band for effecting removal of and rear
rangement of particles on the filter band by caus 15
ing the same to be thrown into space against
another portion of the band for eifectlng separa
tion of‘ the dry and less dry pulp, a juice collector
outside the band and arranged to collect juice
passing through the band and discharged cen 20
trifugally therefrom, the dry pulp when dis
removing material which does not adhere to the charged from the band having a path of discharge
foraminous member or which after being thrown downwardly from the space con?ned by the band.
fails to again lodge on the member.
32. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from’
25
26. Apparatus of the class described, compris pulp or the like, comprising a continuous move 25
ing two pulleys and a belt passing about the pul
able ?lter band disposed edgewise to a horizontal
leys, the space between the pulleys and the two plane and movable through a curved path, means
reaches of the belt being open, and means for for driving said band, means for delivering com
driving the pulleys and belt at such high speed as minuted fruit pulp or the like against the inner
30 to cause material to be thrown from the belt face of said band, said means comprising a grat 30
across the open space.
1
ing disc movable in the same direction as the
27. Apparatus of the class described, compris
?lter band and having means at its edge for di
ing two pulleys and a belt passing about the pul
recting pulp downwardly and outwardly by cen
leys, the space between the pulleys and the two trifugal force against the inner face of the band
35 reaches of the belt being open, and means for to thereby distribute pulp over the inner face of 35
driving the pulleys and belt at such high speed as the band and with a motion that causes it to re- '
to cause material to be thrown from the belt main on the band at the point of impingement
across the open space, one of said pulleys being with the band until it is subsequently rearranged,
arranged to discharge fresh material through its a roller eccentrically positioned inside the band
40 periphery and against the inner surface of the and being arranged to press against pulp carried 40
belt.
,
by the inner face of the band, said roller consti
28. Apparatus of the class described, compris
tuting the principal mechanical means for effect- ‘
ing a pair of pulleys and a belt passing there— ing rearrangement of particles on the ?lter band
about, and means for driving the same, said pul
and for effecting separation of the dry and moist
45 leys and belt being so disposed with relation to pulp, and a juice collector outside the band ar 45
each other that material is thrown from a region ranged to collect juice‘ discharged therethrough,
on one part of the belt against another portion of the dry pulp when discharged from the band hav
the belt moving in an opposite direction.
ing a path of discharge downwardly from the
29. Apparatus of the class described, compris
space con?ned by the band.
33. Apparatus for removing juice from pulp by 50
50 ing a pair of pulleys and a belt passing there
about, means for driving the same, said pulleys a combined pressing and centrifuging, compris
and belt being so disposed with relation to each ing a continuous foraminous member set edge
other that material is thrown from a region on wise to a horizontal plane and being substantially
one part of the belt against another portion of completely open at its bottom, means for driving
55 the belt moving in an opposite direction, and the member at relatively high speed, means for
means for de?ecting one reach of the belt from supplying fresh pulp to the inner surface of the
a line of contact between the two pulleys to more said member, roller means positioned within the
effectually produce a discharge of material from said member to press against pulp on the inner
the de?ected portion of the belt into the space face of said member to squeeze it, said roller
means constituting the only means for coopera 60
60 between the reaches of the belt.
30. In the art of extracting juice from pulp, tion with the inner surface of said member for
the steps which comprise subjecting the pulp to engaging pulp on said inner surface, said mem
a rapid succession of pressing and centrifuging ber and roller means cooperating to remove the
operations and between such operations throwing
the pulp as a dispersion through space to a posi
substantially dehydrated pulp' by selective action
in which the substantially dehydrated pulp is 65
tion for re-pressing and centrifuging, permitting
the particles which'fall out of the dispersion to
projected from the member into the space en
be removed from the mass, and continuously
mingling fresh pulp with that which has been
of the member, and means at the outside of the
70 pressed one or more times.
31. Apparatus for the extraction of juice from
pulp or the like, comprising a continuous mov
closed by the member, from whence it falls clear
foraminous member for collecting juice dis
charged centrifugally therefrom.
CLARENCE E. JENKINS.
70
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