close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2106517

код для вставки
. Jan. 25, 1938.
N. v. CHRISTENSEN ET AL
2,105,517
FABRIC FEEDING MECHANISM FOR SEWING MACHINES
Filed June 5, 1955
4 sheets-sheet 1
H61 I_
X
-
l;
'
'
49
l
/
o
-!
.50
..
511/
~
51v
'
z
.52
v
‘
i7
5.5
'5 .
1
51
'
,
0‘
\
55
5
if)‘;
‘
\
\
45
45
20 ' l
\29
’ NormanVL'hnsifcnsm,
‘Charles K’ 1171117371,
7-!‘ ram‘, lLaVzsconia,
Jan. 25, 1938.
’
N. v. CHRISTENSEN ET AL
2,106,517
FABRIC FEEDING MECHANISM FOR SEWING MACHINES
Filed June 5, 1935
I
k
W1 TNEISSESQ; .
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
> ,
_
’
'
_
1NVENTOR$=
mrman'lf?hrisim
‘
Chart“ 1? Rig/T130111‘
TTORNEYS.
Jan. 25, 1938-
N. v._ CHRISTENSEN. ET AL
2,106,517
FABRIC FEEDING MECHANISM FOR SEWING MACHINES
Filed June 5, 1935
4 Sheets-Sheet 5
PIC-71E
27a
INVENTORSI
.
79¢
""TNESSES'
9/)
5a
y”
‘
,
‘
‘
mrmany?hrishnscn
charms FHuZmL, .’
L'Larenca (I- Smiih 5:.
-‘
BY Harold LILz?/ssconia,
Jan. 25, 1938.
N. v. CHRISTENSEN‘ z-rr AL
2,106,517
FABRIC FEEDING MECHANISM FOR SEWING MACHINES
, Filed June 5; 1935
>
WITNESSES:
£166’
a;
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
M
'
S
NVENTOR5=
L'harlas 'FI' Rahal???
Ciarenca 6.5111351» 13!. 1
By
011d, JLa'lésoo 5a,
ATTORNEYS.
Patented Jan. 25, 1938
2,106,517
UNITED STATES
‘PATENT orrica
2,106,517
FABRIC FEEDING MECHANISM FOR SEW
ING MACHINES
Norman V. Christensen, Charles F. Rube], Clar
once 0. Smith, Chicago, and Harold J. Le
Vesconte, Western Springs, 111., assignors to
Union Special Machine Company, Ohicagmlllu
a corporation of Illinois
Application June 5, 1935, Serial No. 25,094
’
36 Claims. (01. 112-212)
This invention relates to mechanism adapted
Fig. IV is a view corresponding to Fig. II with
to progress fabric along the work support of a the presser foot element lifted.
_
sewing machine for seaming.
Fig. V is a plan sectional view taken as indi
The fabric feeding elements heretofore gener
cated by the arrows V-'—V in Fig. IV.
ally used in sewing machines are of two types,
Fig. V1 is a plan sectional view taken as indi
to wit: the intermittent surface contact type 'ex
cated by the arrows VI-VI in Fig. VII.
empli?ed by the four motion feed dog; and the
Fig. VII is a fragmentary view in elevation look
constant single line contact type exempli?ed by ing as indicated by the arrows VII-VII in Fig. I.
the roller. While the feed dog is advantageous
Fig. VIII is a cross sectional view taken as in
in that it makes substantial surface contact with dicated by the ‘arrows VIII—VIII in Fig. II; and
the fabric, its constant pounding at high speeds
Fig. IX is a fragmentary perspective view of
may result in marring the surface of the fabric. the feed chain belt.
The roller feed is not‘fully effective to perform
As herein shown, the feed mechanism of our
difficult feeding because of its limited contact invention comprises a ?exible element in the form
15 with the fabric.
of a relatively wide, horizontal, endless chain
Our invention is more particularly intended ‘to belt I adapted in ‘this instance to yieldingly en
overcome the foregoing drawbacks. This ob
gage the fabric F being sewed in the machine
jective we attain, as hereinafter more fully dis
from above. The chain belt I is intermittently
closed, through provision ofa feed element in the moved, by means later on described, in the direc
tion indicated by the arrow in Fig. IV to progress
20 form of a ?exible horizontal chain belt having
links with serrated fabric engaging edges, and the fabric along the work support 2 of the ma
aligned with the needle or needles in the direction chine relative to the'three staggeringly-arranged
of feed, the needle or needles‘ being thereby left needles 3, the illustrated machine being of a type
free of obstructionand hence readily‘accessible designed for sewing triple-stitched,‘ double-lap,
for threading.
'
»
felled seams such as illustrated at‘ S in Fig. III.
Another object of our invention is to incor
As shown, the chain belt I is allocated in the
porate as a component part of feed mechanism , rear of the needles 3_so that ready access may be
characterized as above, a presser foot capable of had to the latter for threading, and is composed
up and down movement in coordination with the of stamped metal links with serrated or toothed
edges to take effective hold upon the fabric. The
30 feed belt to facilitate over-riding of cross seams
} and the like in the fabric.
intermediate links la of the chain I (Fig. IX)
A further object of our invention is to provide are suitably con?gured to mesh with the teeth of
for the support of the belt and the presser foot y spaced drive and idler sprocketwheels 4 and 5
by a single yielding means with capacity for about which said chain is trained; while the
adapting themselves positionally to the contour outermost chain links lb lap the sides of the
of the fabric passing beneath them in the manner sprockets and thereby hold the. chain against lat
explained above. ‘
~
eral displacement. The idler sprocket 5 revolves
Another object of our invention is to provide freely about a non-rotating axis pin 6 which ex
means whereby the pressure exerted upon the tends crosswise of one end of a journal member
1 fulcrumed for up and down rocking movement
40 fabric by the feed belt and the presser foot ele
ment may be differentially regulated for adapta
on the shaft 8 where to the drive sprocket wheel
tion of the mechanism to exacting requirements 4 is secured, the spaced side portions or cheeks 1a
of practice.
of said journal member being integrally connect
Still other objects of our invention will be man
ed by a transverse bridging web ‘lb above the
ifest from the detailed description following of sprocket 5. As shown in Fig. VIII, the sprocket
the drawings, wherein Fig. I is a fragmentary axis pin 6 has an eccentric portion 6a between
view showing, in part, the rear elevation of a sew
concentric end portions 617 and 60 which are en
ing machine embodying our novel feed mecha-’ gaged in aligned apertures in the cheeks ‘Id of
nism.
the journal member ‘I, the end portion 617 of said
Fig. II is a fragmentary sectional view taken as pin being slotted. as at id for engagement by a
. indicated by the arrows II—II in Fig. I.
Fig. H1 is a view looking as indicated by the
arrows III-III in Fig. II, with'certain parts
broken away to expose important details which
would otherwise be hidden.
v
screw driver. Accordingly, by turning the pin
10
15
20'
25
30
35
40
45
60'
6 it is possible to take up slack in the chain l
as may be required from time to time. After
adjustment, the axis pin 6 is clamped against ‘the.
possibility of accidental rotation by a clamp screw
e
2
2,106,517
be which engages axially into the reduced, con
centric end portion 50 thereof. But the chain is
never so taut as to prevent’ vit from yielding‘up
wardly between the sprocket wheels "to" a slight
extent when required by conditions of ‘)usage.
From Figs. V and VII it willbe observed that
the ends of theaxis- or shaft 9 of the sprocket
wheel 4 are engaged in bearings 9a on laterally
spaced rearward extremities 9b of a horizontal
extension 21a of an adjusting screw 21 which is
adjustable in an angle bracket 28 secured to the
projecting end of the arm l8 on the presser bar
l5 and which is ?xable in adjusted positions by
a clamp nut 29. By adjusting the screw 21 it
is possible to regulate the force of a helical
spring 30 which surrounds the pilot extension of
said screw, and which, at its lower end bears
upon the bottom of the hollow in the sleeve 25, _
carrier member 9, whllch,_as shown, has the form (Fig. II) the pressure of the spring being com
of a double yoke frame whereof the opposite side} municated through the sleeve to the journal
portions are integrally connected bya transverse member ‘I.
Also adjustable in the angle bracket 28 is
web 90. Supported between the forward ex
tremities 9d of the horizontal carrier member another adjusting screw 3| with a diametrically
9 ‘in the rear of the chain l and aligned there vreduced pilot extension am which reaches part
with in the direction of feed is, a presser foot way down into a vertical sleeve 32 and subject
10 having upward lugs Illa pivotally connected to a helical compression spring 33. The bottom
to the ends of said_extremities by, screw studs end of the sleeve 32 is clevised as shown at 32a
H, and having its front end inclined upwardly for connection by a pivot screw 34 with the end
20 as at lllb so that it can readily over-ride cross
of the longer of the two rearward extremities 20
seams and the like in the fabric F. As shown, 9b of the horizontal carrier member 9, see Figs.
the horizontal portion of the presser foot I0 is III, V, VI and VII. ‘The function of the spring
provided with longitudinally-elongate apertures 33 is to oppose, to a certain extent, the pressure
l2 for passage of the seaming needles 3 of the of the presser bar l5 upon the presser foot l0
25 machine. In the illustrated instance the under
and thereby correspondingly relieve the latter
30
35
40
'
45
face of the presser foot I!) is recessed lengthwise
so that cross seams in the fabric F may more
as at lllc to clear the double lap felled seam
S of the fabric in the manner clearly shown in
readily pass thereunder. A jamb nut 35 serves
to secure the screw 3| in adjusted positions.
The rocking movement of the belt I and the
rocking movement of the presser foot II) are both 30
of special utility when a cross seam passes under
the presser foot and then under the feed belt as
Fig. III.
Approximately midway between‘ the bearings
9a and the pivots Illa of the presser foot ele
ment ill, the horizontal carrier member 9 has
pivot connections l3 at opposite sides with they it enables this to be accomplished with very little
ends of a pair of fork arms Ha pendant from a rise or fall of the presser bar. This is desirable
shank member M which is secured to the bottom in that there is less flexure of the presser bar
end of the presser bar l5 of‘ the machine by spring and therefore less danger of its breaking
screws l6. As usual, the presser bar I5 is guided through crystallization. Moreover, in partaking
of rocking movement to accommodate progres—
for axial movement in the head ll of the sew
ing machine, and, moreover, is subject to a sion of a cross seam beneath it, the feed belt re
relatively heavy spring (not illustrated) which mains in contact with the fabric not only at
the cross seam but also with the fabric either
exerts yielding downward pressure thereupon.
Clamped to the presser bar within the hollow in the front or in the rear of the cross seam
according to the position of the latter and the
of the head I‘! is an arm l8 which extends out
ward through an,_ opening in one side of said‘ direction of rocking. Furthermore, the feed belt
head and‘ engages between a pair of vertical is capable of yielding upwardly between its sup
guide plates I9 made fast to the head by screws porting wheels. Accordingly, effective contact
2ll,'see Figs. II and III, the presser bar being over an extensive area is maintained‘ with the
thus held against rotation incident to its axial fabric under all conditions.
In order to prevent the driven portion of the
movements. Pivotally engaging the sprocket
shaft 8 in the intervals between the cheeks ‘Ia feed chain I from coming into direct contact‘
with the work support 2 of the sewing machine
of the journal member ‘I and the rearward ex
tremities 9b of the horizontal carrier member at any time, a stop means has been provided to
9, are the extremities _2la of a vertical guide limit . the downward movement thereof. As
member 2| which also has the form of a yoke
55 with a cross web 2") integrally uniting said
extremities at the top. As shown, the guide
members 2| is slotted centrally of its top as at
2lc (Figs. III and VI) to engage an integral
60 rearwardly extending horizontal tongue Nb of
the shank member H, which tongue in turn en
gages the vertical slot 22a in’ an angle bracket
22 secured to the head I‘! of the sewing machine
by screws 23. Obviously, by virtue of the ar
65 rangement just described, the: feed chain belt I
is positively maintained aligned with the needles
3 of the machine in the direction of feed.
In order to yieldingly hold down the free end
of the journal member 1, means have been pro
70 vided which include a vertical sleeve 25 with a
closed spherical bottom end and a projecting
axial tip 250. which engage an apertured seat 26
in the top of the cross web "lb 'of said member.
Extending part way into the hollow of the sleeve
25 from above is the diametrically reduced pilot
-
'
40
45
50
shown in Figs. III and VII this stop means com
prises a drop link 36‘ which pivots on a screw.‘
31 at one side of the angle bracket 22, and which,
at its lower end, has a vertical slot 31a to co
operate with a stud 38 projecting laterally from
the guide member 2!.
With no fabric beneath
the belt I, the-pin 38 rests in the bottom of the 60
slot 31a of the link 36 and thereby holds the
guide member 20 at an elevation such that there
is a slight clearance beneath the belt I at the
sprocket wheel 4. The extent of up and down
swinging movement of the journal member ‘I
about the axis 8 of the drive sprocket 4 is limited
through cooperation of a .stud screw 40 at one -
side of said journal member with an enlarged
hole 4| ‘in the corresponding .side of the guide
member 2|, see Figs. II, III and IV.
'
Suitable means such as shown in U. S. Pat
'ent No. 1,758,349 of .May 13, 1930, to Joseph
Berger et-al., may be utilized in the sewing ma
chine for raising the presser bar to lift the
feed belt I andv the presser foot high above the 75
amass’?
work support 2 when required.‘ With initiation
comprising an endless chain belt; means for driv
in the upward movement of the presser bar by
means such as just referred to, the presser foot
H3 rises ahead of the chain l until the extremi
ties 9d of they carrier member 9 engage the
ing the belt to progress the fabric; means crea't- .
ing downward pressure to hold the belt in con
tact with the fabric being seamed; and means
permitting‘ said belt to rock, thereby assisting
progression of» cross seams under the'belt.
5.-Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising. spaced sprocket wheels; an endless
chain belt composed "of intermediate and outer
shoulders Md on the extremities Ma oi the shank
member id, as shown in Fig. IV. Then, as the
upward movement of the presser bar-~55 con‘
tinues, the journal member 1 will pivot on the
10 sprocket wheel axis 6 until the stud 69 engages
the edge of the enlarged hole M in the guide
links with ‘serrated edges to engage the fabric 10
‘being seamed in the machine, the intermediate
1 _ member 29, whereafter the feed chain 5- will be >1-links of the chain belt being notched for en
gagement by the teeth of the sprocket wheels
bodily lifted entirely clear of the work support.
and the
e links lapping the outer sides vof
the sprockets to prevent displacement of the 15
1 ‘Any suitable means may be provided for mov-- >
ing the belt as required to progress the fabric
along the work plate. This means may for ex; belt; means for maintaining the belt yieldingly
ample comprise a bevel gear wheelél?secured in contact withthe fabric; and mcans'for driv~
_
to one end of the drive sprocket'shaft 3, and a ing the belt.
6.! Feeding mechanism for‘ sewing machines
meshing companion sprocket wheel [53 at the
20 bottom end of a vertical shaft Ml having jour ; cbmprislng an endless belt ‘in line with the nee
dle of the machine in the direction of feed;
nal support in a bearirfg at thepend of a lat
eral arm projection Zld of the guide member means for maintaining the belt with capacity
2i. As shown in Figs. I and II the vertical for angular movement. yieldingly in surface con
shaft 56 telescopically engages a sleeve 35, which, tact with the fabric being seamed in the ma
at ‘its upper end, has a universal connection db " chine; and means for driving the belt.
7‘. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
‘with an aligned vertical shaft ?ll having journal
support in a fixed bearing d8. A key dda (Fig. ‘ comprising an endless belt in line with, and dis
II) secured to the upper end of theshait ts posed in the rear of theseaming needle of the
engages a longitudinalslot £351; in the sleeve machine inthe direction of feed; means for
'eo 45 to prevent relative rotationbetweensaid shaft maintaininglthe belt with capacity for angular
_:movement, yieldingly in surface contact with the
and sleeve while permitting up and down move
ments of the feed belt I during. the operation fabric'beingseanied in the machine; and means
of the, sewing machine as well as during lift; for ‘driving. the belt.
ing of the belt by raising of the presser bar-v -_- '8. Feeding. mechanisrn' for sewing machines
35 i5. ri‘he vertical ‘shaft 137 is intermittently ro-v - comprising an endless belt-adapted to engage
tated through the medium‘ of a roller clutch (not the fabric being-seamed in the machine; means
illustrated) concealed in a hollow cylinder db at for supporting the belt in yielding contact with
the top of the head l‘l, said clutch being con ' the fabric with capacity for direct vertical move
nected by a horizontal link Edwith a rocker arm merit as well as for up and down rocking move.
40 l' 5i fulcrumed at 52 to the side of the machine merit; and ‘means for driving the belt. ,
-
20
30
35
‘
frame. The rocker arm Si is in-turn actuated y 1 _9.. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
from an eccentric‘ 53 on a continuouslyrotating ‘ comprising an endless chain. belt adapted to en
shaft 541 which receives its motion'from the drive H gage the fabric being seamed in the machine and
- having capacity for angular movement; sprocket
7 .
From the foregoing" it _will be seenthat the wheels around‘ which said belt is trained, said,
feed mechanism of our invention is simple in‘ sprocket wheels being so spaced as to maintain
construction since both the'feed chain 8 and the ‘ the ____sur'f_ace_ oi?the chain belt in effective con
presser foot W are carried by a single yielding‘v '_tact‘ with the ‘work being fed'while .yet permit
element-in this instance, the spring in?uenced ting,‘ aslight. yielding of the belt between the
presser bar_ lee-and both ‘accordingly urged' sprocket'wheels-“when' required by conditions of 50
downward with capacity to adaptjthemselves
l0.- Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
positionally to surface variations of the fabric
mechanism of the sewing machine.
50
usage.
passing beneath them.
,
.
'
'
-.comprising an endless belt adapted to engage '
the fabric being seemed in the machine; sup
porting means for the belt in operative connec-I
comprising an endless belt; yielding means for tion' with the presser bar of the machine with
holding the belt with capacity for angular move- . capacity for independent up and down and angu-.
la-i' movement; and means fordriving the belt.
mentpin pressure contact with the fabric be
11. Feeding mechanism ‘for sewing machines
ing seamed in the sewing machine;v and means
comprising an endless belt and a presser foot in 60
for driving the belt to progress’ the fabric.
2. Feeding mechanism for ‘sewing machines line with the needle oi the machine in the direction
of feed; means for maintainin'g'the belt and the
comprising an endless belt; yielding means op
erative from above for holding the belt with ca» . presser ioot. in yielding pressure contact with
pacity for angular movement in pressurecone the fabric being seamed; their vertical motions
Having thus described our invention, we claim‘.
1. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines ~
60
tact with the upper side of the fabric being
seemed in the machine; and‘ means for-driving
being so coordinated as to compensate. for varia
tions in the thickness of the fabric; and means for
the belt.
driving the belt.
-
"
3. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless chain belt with links hav .
ing serrated edges to engage the fabric being.‘
seamed in the‘ machine; means for maintaining
the belt with capacity for angular movement,.
, in yielding pressure contact with the fabric; and
means for driving the belt.
4. Feeding mechanism for sewingmachinea
'
'
12.1Feeding, mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless feed belt and a presser foot;
means ‘for. maintaining both the belt and the 70
presser foot in‘ yielding pressure contact with the
fabricrz~beihg seamed; and means for permitting
the belt and the presser foot to rock, ?ach in rela
tion to they other,'to facilitate the passage of a i
cross seam.
‘
'
‘.
75.
4
'
.
.
9,106,517
13. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines > means for intermittently driving one of said
Cl
comprising an endless feed belt; and a presser
wheels to move the belt.
foot, both belt and presser foot being pressed down
upon the fabric being seamed, and both belt and
22. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
presser foot having capacity for a rocking motion
as the fabric passes beneath them.
which the belt is trained; a journal member for 5
the wheels; a horizontal carrier member ful
14. Feeding‘mechanism for sewing~machines
crumed on one of the wheel axes; a presser foot
comprising an endless belt disposed in the rear of
the needle of the sewing machine and in line with
10 said needle in the direction of, feed; a presser foot
forward of said belt; means for maintaining the
belt and the presser foot in yielding pressure con
tact with the fabric being seamed and with alter
pivotally connected to said carrier member; a
shank member on the presser bar of the sewing
nating compensation of their vertical motions to
allow for variations in the thickness of the fabric;
and means for driving the belt.
15. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; a presser foot; a single
means for maintaining the belt and the presser
foot in yielding pressure contact with the fabric
being seamed; means permitting angular move
ment of the belt; and means for driving the belt.
16. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; a presser foot; a sin
gle means for maintaining the belt and the press
er foot in yielding contact with the fabric being
seamed so that both have the capacity for rock
ing motion as the fabric passes beneath them; and
means for driving the belt.
1'7. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt adapted to engage the
fabric being seamed in the machine; means for
supporting the belt with capacity for independent
er foot, so that the belt and the presser foot can
move up and down together to facilitate passage
of cross seams in the fabric beneath them; and
means for driving the belt.
23. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
which the belt is trained; a journal member for
the wheels connected to the presser bar of the 20
machine with capacity for up and down rocking
movement; means in?uential upon the journal
member to maintain the belt'in yielding contact
with the fabric being seamed in the machine;
means for driving one of the wheels to move the
belt; ‘and means for preventing rotation of the
presser bar about its own axis and for maintain
ing the belt aligned in the direction of the feed.
24. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; a drive and an idler 30
wheel about which the belt is trained; a journal
member for the two wheels; a horizontal carrier
member fulcrumed on the drive wheel axis; a
rocking movement, in operative connection with
presser foot pivotally connected'to the carrier
the presser bar of the sewing machine; a presser
foot connected to the belt supporting means; and
member; a shank member on the presser bar of '
means for driving the belt.
.
v18. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt adapted to engage the
40 fabric being seamed in the machine; means 'for
the sewing machine Whereto said carrier member
is pivotally connected at a point intermediate the
drive wheel axis and the pivot axis of the press
supporting the belt in operative connection with
er foot so thatsaid belt and the presser foot can
move up and down together to facilitate passage 40
of cross seams in the fabric beneath them; a ?xed
the presser bar of the machine and with capacity
for up and down rocking movement;‘a presser
vertically-slotted bracket engaged by a horizon
tal tongue projection of the‘ shank member afore
foot connected to said supporting means with
capacity to move up and down with the belt; and
said‘; a guide member having a connection with
the drive wheel axis, and a slotted upper portion
slidingly engaging the tongue of the shank mem
means for driving the belt.
'
19. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
ber to maintain the belt aligned in the direction
of feed; and means for actuating the drive wheel
which the belt is trained; a journal member for
the wheels; means in?uential upon the journal
member to maintain the belt with capacity for
to move the belt.
25. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
angular movement, in yielding contact with the
which the belt is trained; pressure means for sup-
fabric being seamed in the machine; and means
for driving one of the wheels to move the belt.
20. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
which the belt is trained; a journal member for
the wheels connected to the presser bar’ of the
60
machine whereto the horizontal carrier member 10
is pivotally connected at a point intermediate the
fulcrum wheel axis and the pivot axis of the press
machine with capacity for independent rocking
_movement; means in?uential upon the journal
member to maintain the belt in yielding contact
with the fabric being seamed in. the machine;
and means for driving one of the wheels to move
the belt.
_
21. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
which the belt is trained; a journal member for
the wheels connected to'the presser bar of the
machine with capacity for up and down pivotal
movement about the axis of one of said wheels;
means in?uential upon the free end of said jour
nal member to assist in maintaining the corre
sponding portion of the belt in yielding contact
‘with the fabric being seemed in the machine; and
porting the wheels with capacity to permit rock
ing movement of the belt about the axis of one 0!
the belt wheels as a fulcrum incident to passage
of fabric therebeneath; means for driving the
belt; and means whereby the slack of the belt
may be’regulated to permit passage of cross seams
of di?erent thicknesses beneath its center portion
while the portions, of the belt at the wheels are 60
maintained in contact with the fabric.
26. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
which the belt is trained; a. journal member for
the wheels; means in?uential upon the journal
member to maintain the belt in yielding contact -
with the fabric being seamed in the machine;
means for driving the belt; and an axis pin
whereon one of ‘the wheels is mounted, said pin
being rotatably adjustable in the journal mem
ber so that the slack of the belt may be regulated.
27. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless belt; spaced wheels about
which the belt is trained: a journal member for
the wheels: 9. horizontal carrier member ful
91,106,517
crumed on one of the wheel axes; a presser foot
;5
31. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
pivotally connected tosaid carrier‘ member; a
comprising an endless belt with links having
shank member on the presser bar of the sewing serrated edges to engage the fabric being seamed.
machine whereto the horizontal carrier member ' in the machine; spaced wheels about which ‘the
is pivotally connected at a point intermediate the
fulcrum wheel axis and the pivot axis of the
presser foot, so that the belt and the presser foot
belt is trained; pressure means for supporting
the wheels with capacity to permit rocking move Cl
ment of the belt about the axis of either wheel
can move up and down together to facilitate
passage of the cross seams beneath them; means
as a fulcrum incident to passage of the fabric
for driving the belt; and adjustable spring means
32. Feed mechanism for sewing machines com
prising an endless horizontal belt; spaced wheels 10
about which the belt is trained; a pivotally sup
ported presser foot in line with the belt; and
pressure means permitting the belt to rock about
the pivot of the presser foot and the latter to
in?uential upon an arm extension’ of the hori
zontal carrier member to counteract, in part, the
pressure of the presser bar and thereby corre
spondingly relieve the presser foot.
28. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless drive belt; a drive and idler
wheel about which the belt is trained; a journal
member for the two wheels; a horizontal carrier
member fulcrumed on the drive wheel axis; a
20 presser foot pivotally connected to the carrier
therebeneath; and means for driving the belt.
bodily rock about the axis of one of the belt I
wheels.
33. Feed mechanism for sewing machines com
prising an endlesshorizontal belt; spaced wheels
about which the belt is trained; a pivotally sup 20
pressure means permitting the belt to rock about
the pivot of the presser foot and the latter to
bodily rock about the axis of the belt wheel con
. member; a shank member on the presser bar of - ported presser foot in line with the belt; and
the sewing machine whereto said carrier member
is pivotally connected at ‘a point intermediate the
drive wheel axis and the pivot axis of the presser
foot so that said belt and the presser foot can
move up and ‘down together to facilitate passage
of cross seams beneath them; a ?xed vertically
slotted bracket engaged by a horizontal tongue
projection on the shank member aforesaid; a
guide member having a connection with the drive
wheel axis and a slotted upper portion slidingly
engaging the tongue of the vshank member to
maintain the belt aligned in the direction of feed;
ti’guous thereto.
-
34. Feed mechanism for sewing machines com
prising an endless horizontal belt; spaced wheels
about which the belt is trained; an arm ful
crumed on one of the wheel axes; a presser'foot
pivotally connected to the outer end of the arm; 30
and pressure means pivotally connected to the
arm at an intermediate point.
35. Feed mechanism ‘for sewing machines com
a bevel gear on the drive wheel axis; an‘ inter- ‘ prising an endless horizontal belt; spaced wheels
about which. the belt is trained; a. presser foot in
35 meshing bevel gear on a vertical shaft having
journal support in a bearing on the guide mem
ber; an intermittently rotated vertical drive shaft
journaled in the frame of the sewing machine; a
sleeve having a universal connection with the
?rst mentioned vertical shaft; and a key on the
latter shaft slidingly engaging a slot in the
sleeve.
29. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
line with the belt; an arm to the end of which 35
the presser foot is pivoted, said aim being ful
crumed on the axis of the belt wheel which is
contiguous to the presser foot; and pressure means
having a pivotal connection with the arm at an '
40
_
‘
intermediate point.
36. Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
comprising an endless horizontal belt disposed
in the line of feeding; spaced wheels about which
the belt is trained; a pivotally-supported presser
foot ahead of the belt in the line of feeding; pres 45
comprising an endless'belt; spaced wheels about
which the belt is trained; pressure means for
supporting the wheels with capacity to permit
rocking movement of the belt about the axis of sure means for supporting the wheels and the .
either wheel as a fulcrum incident to passage of presser foot with capacity to permit rocking
fabric therebeneath; and means for driving the .movement of the belt ‘either about the axis of
belt.
,
the foremost of the two wheels or about the pivot
50
30. Feed mechanism for sewing machines com
of the presser foot incident to passage of fabric 50
prising an endless horizontal belt; spaced wheels therebeneath; and means for driving the belt.
about which the belt is trained; pressure means
for supporting the wheels from above with
NORMAN V. CHRISTENSEN.
capacity to permit rocking movement of the belt
CHARLES F. RUBEL.
55 about the axis of either wheel as a fulcrum in
CLARENCE C.'SMITH.
45
cident to passage of the. fabric therebeneath; '
and means for driving the belt.
HAROLD J. LE VESCQNTE.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
1 106 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа