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Патент USA US2106616

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Jan. 25, 1938.
2,106,616
‘R. L. MCCOY
SWITCH AND BUS INSULATOR STACK
Filed Nov. 6, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet l
35:?” 6
790%»? .43. ?fégy
Jan. 25, 1938.
R. L. MccoY
2,106,616
SWITCH AND BUS INSULATOR STACK
Filed Nov. 6, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
2,106,616
Patented Jan. 25, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
_
5106.618 .
_ swrrca AND nus msum'roa s'racx
W L. New, Baltimore. 1111.,v mic.
Locke Insulator Corporation, a corporation of‘
Maryland
Application am 0. \ms, semiv No. 48,580"
6m
(Cl. \1318-418)
mechanism, a bus or the like and has for its gen
tionary in cases where the structure is used for the
moimting of buses.
A more speci?c object of the invention is to
either in a vertical or a horizontal position and
for bracing purposes are likewise pivotally con
which is peculiarly and adequately braced against
tings, with the top of the insulator under com 10
pression and to the main support upon which the
entire structure is mounted, these features insur
ing that the tension in the sets of bracing insu
lators will equalize and throw no initial cantilever
strains on the unit under compression, the latter 15
being at all times held rigidly so that de?ection
The invention relates to an insulator assembly
adapted for ‘ supporting a disconnecting switch
eral object the provision of a novel insulating and ‘ provide a structure of this character in which the 5
insulator unit under compression is mounted at
5 supporting structure embodying the combination its lower end for limited rocking movement and
of certain insulators imder compression and cer
tain others under tension, which may be mounted in which the insulators under tension employed
10 cantilever strains or in fact any distortion even
, under the most severe conditions of use.
It is well known that at the higher voltages, 220
kilovolts and upwardly, tall insulator stacks are
required for supporting a switch mechanism, a
15 bus, or other device. It has been found di?lcult
to build a completely self-supporting single post
rigid enough to withstand the stresses involved
without considerable de?ection which causes diill
culty for instance ‘in satisfactorily maintaining
20 proper alinement of disconnecting switch con
tacts. Due to the inherent ?exibility of single
post stacks, they present a considerable hazard
under earthquake conditions which frequently oc
our in the western and intermountain territory of
25 this country. The ?exibility of such stacks per
mits the insulators to get into a periodic vibratory
condition if earth tremors continue for any ap
preciable periodof time and may result in the
destruction of buses and switches.
It has been proposed to make use of tripod in
30
sulator stacks but these have proven diilicult to
handle for several reasons. In disconnecting
switches it is generally desired that one of the
stacks of the tripod be capable of rotation for the
35 transmission of mechanical energy for the opera
tion of the switch contacts. Furthermore it is
difficult to build the end ?ttings suiliciently ac
curately that when the stacks are bolted up they
will fit together so neatly that no initial strains
40 are set up in the stacks. Even where these pre-P
cautions have been taken the tripod scheme is
not particularly strong in torsion. Moreover
when use is made of a tripod arrangement in
volving three stacks of pedestal or similar insu
45 lators, which are relatively expensive compared
with other types, the cost becomes excessive.
It is with the above facts in view that I have
devised the present invention which has for an
important object the provision of a structure in
cluding a single stack of pedestal or other more or
less similar insulators adapted to be placed and
maintained under compression and braced by
sets of other insulators under tension, the stack
being rotatable in case the structure is used for
55
supporting a disconnecting switch but being sta
nected, through the interposition of suitable ?t
will not occur even under the most adverse con
ditions, such for instance as in the event of earth
tremors.
A further object of the invention is to provide 20
an insulator assembly of this character equipped
with means at the top and bottom for adequate
protection against ?ash-over, this feature requir
ing but simple ?ttings which may be readily
applied.
'
.
25
An additional object is to provide a structure of
this characterwhich on account of being con
structed of standard insulators which are in regu
lar quantity production will be simple and inex
pensive to construct as well as possessing the 30
above mentioned advantageous characteristics
which render it a distinct improvement in the art.
To the attainment of the foregoing and other
objects and advantages, the invention preferably
consists in the details of construction and the ar 35
rangement and combination of parts to be herein
after more fully described and claimed, and illus
trated in the accompanying drawings in which:
Figure l is a side elevation of a switch support
ing insulator assembly constructed in accordance 40
with the invention and illustrating it as mounted
in a vertical position,
Figure 2 is a plan view of the top yoke,
“Figure 3 is a cross section on the line 3-3 01'
Figure 2,
45
Figure 4 is a detail vertical section through the
bottom support or bearing for the compression
receiving unit,
_
Figure 5 is a fragmentary elevation showing
more clearly the mounting of the lower end of
one of the sets of bracing insulators under ten
51013,
Figure 6 is a side elevation of the structure
showing it mounted in a horizontal position.
Referring more particularly to the drawings 55
2
2,106,616
the numeral 10 designates the supporting base
which may be of structural steel or other con
struction and upon which the entire device is
mounted. Suitably secured upon this base is
a support ll having its top formed with a sock
et l2 and also formed with a central opening l3.
Rockably mounted upon the support I I is a bear
ing member H having a depending portion 15
engaged within the socket l2. This bearing
10 member H has a central opening l6 through
which and through the opening l3 extends a
when the shaft H is rotated by any suitable
means, not shown. Upon removal of the thrust
bearings 20 and 28 the device is well adapted
for use for supporting a bus.
Reverting to the springs 36, it will be seen
that it is a simple matter to determine de?nite
ly the amount of tension initially put on the
suspension insulator strings as these springs can
be so designed and calibrated that the coils will
close tightly together at an accurately deter? 10
mined value. Thus, in assembling, the construc
shaft I‘! provided at its upper end with a disk
tor can draw the nuts 35 on the eye bolts 34
or adapter l8 suitably secured to the bottom
down until the coils of the springs are closed
and this will indicate de?nitely the amount of
force which has been applied. As the stack of
pedestal insulators is rockably mounted at its
of the lowermost one of a series of superposed
insulators l9 here shown, for purposes of illus
tration, as of the pedestal type though certain
others could be employed. Interposed between
the bearing 14 and the adapter I8 is a thrust
bearing 20 here represented as of the ball type
20 though there is no particular limitation in this
respect. Secured to the top of the uppermost
insulator I9 is an adapter 2| on the lower end
of a shaft 22 adapted for connection with any
ordinary or preferred type of switch contacts,
25 not shown as being well known in the art. The
shaft 22 passes through a hole 23 in the hub
portion 24 of a spider-like triangular yoke 25
which has radial arms 26 formed at their ends
with holes 21. Interposed between the adapter
2| and the hub portion 24 of the yoke is a thrust
bearing 28.
For bracing the stack_ of pedestal insulators
19, I provide a plurality of sets of insulators
lower end it can accommodate itself to the ten
sion on the respective stringsso that the forces
will be equalized. All cantilever stress is re
moved from the pedestal insulator stack which 20
therefore operates only in direct compression.
A distinct advantage of the entire assembly is
that it consists of standard types of insulators
which are produced regularly in quantities and
there is consequently no necessity for the con 25
struction of any special units.
From the foregoing description and a study
of the drawings it will be apparent that I have
thus provided an assembly which is highly effi
cient for the purpose intended and which will 30
be not only easy to assemble but also inex
pensive. It is thought from the above that the
construction, operation and advantages will be
under tension arranged about the stack and
readily apparent to one skilled in the art with
here shown, simply for purposes of illustration,
as strings of suspension insulators 29 of any
ordinary or preferred type but which are here
disclosed as of the variety equipped with ball
out further explanation.
While I have shown and described the pre
ferred embodiment of the invention, it should
be understood that the disclosure is merely an
exempli?cation of the principles' involved as the
right is reserved to make all such changes in 40
the details of construction as will widen the field
of utility and increase the adaptability of the
device provided such changes constitute no de
parture from the spirit of the invention or the
scope of the claims hereunto appended.
Having thus described the invention, I claim:
1. An insulator assembly comprising a base, a
socketed bearing member mounted on said base,
a stack of pedestal insulators rockably mount
ed on said bearing member, shafts connected, re
spectively, with the top and bottom of the stack,
said shafts being designed and adapted for the
operation of switch means, a yoke at the upper
end of the stack and through which the upper
shaft extends, said yoke having a plurality of 55
arms, a plurality of strings of suspension in
sulators arranged in a circumferential series
about the stack, ?ttings at the upper ends of
said strings pivotally connected with the yoke
and socket means for connecting them in series.
40 At the upper end of each string there ispro
vided a ?tting 3D and these ?ttings are piv
otally connected at 3! with the ends of the arms
of the triangular yoke, the holes 21 receiving
the necessary pivot bolts. At the lower end of
45 each string is a ?tting or bracket 32 and these
are pivotally connected at 33 with eye bolts 34
extending through the base l0. These eye bolts
are equipped with nuts 35 and interposed between
the nuts and the base H) are coil springs 36
which provide means whereby the strings of sus
pension insulators can be placed under the de
sired predetermined tension so that the pedestal
stack will be maintained rigid.
For protecting the entire structure against
?ash-over, I provide a grading ring 31 carried
by a plurality of curved arms 38 suitably secured
to the arms 26 of the triangular yoke at the top
of the pedestal stack. This ring 31 cooperates
with a plurality of substantially half rings 35
which are secured to the ?ttings or brackets 32
at the lower ends of the strings and which pro
iect outwardly away from the same and in an
upwardly curved direction.
The entire assembly may be mounted in a
vertical position as shownin Figure 1 in which
event it is preferable that all of the suspen
sion insulators be arranged with their convex
sides up. However, if it is so desired, the as
sembly may be mounted upon a suitable sup
port so as to extend horizontally in which event
the uppermost string of suspension insulators
would probably be reversed as shown in Figure
6. The structure is primarily intended as the
support for a switch embodying appropriate con
tacts adapted to be operated by the shaft 22
arms, eye bolts extending through the base, and
?ttings at the lower ends of the strings pivotal
ly connected with said eye bolts.
2. An insulator assembly comprising a. base, a
socketed bearing member mounted on said base,
a stack of pedestal insulators rockably mounted
on said bearing member, shafts connected, re
spectively, with the top and bottom of the stack,
said shafts being designed and adapted for the
operation of switch means, a yoke at the upper
end of the stack and through which the upper 70
shaft extends, said yoke having a plurality of
arms, a plurality of strings of suspension insu
lators arranged in a circumferential series about
the stack, ?ttings at the upper ends of said strings
pivotally connected with the yoke arms, eye bolts 75
3
8,100,618
extending through the base, ?ttings at the lower
ends of the strings pivotally connected with said
eye bolts, and spring means associated with said
eye bolts for applying a predetermined tension
upon said strings.
"
3. An insulator assembly comprising a base, a
socket member mounted on said base, a bearing
member rocka'bly mounted on said socket ment
ber, a stack of pedestal insulators, a thrust bear~
10
5. An insulator assembly comprising a base, a
socketed member mounted on the base. an in
sulator rockably mounted on said bearing mem
ber, shafts (onnccted with the top and bottom
of said insulator, said shafts being designed and
adapted for the operation of switch means, a yoke
at the upper end of the insulator and through
which the upper shaft extends, said yoke having
a plurality of arms, a plurality of insulator mem
ing interposed between said bearing member and ' bers arranged in a circumferential series about 10
the adjacent end of the stack, a shaft rotatable said insulator, ?ttings at the ‘upper ends of said
through said socket and bearing member. and insulator members pivotally connected with the
connected with the end or the stack, a second
shaft secured to the other end of the stack, a
15 yoke through which said second named shaft ex
tends, a thrust bearing interposed between said
yoke and the second named end of the stmk, a
plurality of strings of suspension insulators arm
ranged in circumferential series about the stack
20 and pivotally connected with the yoke and with
the base, and means for applying predetermined
initial tension upon the strings.
_4. An insulator assembly comprising a base, a
socketed bearing member mounted on the base,
25 an insulator rockably mounted on said heating
member, shafts connected respectively with the
top and bottom of the insulator, said shafts be~
ing designed and. adapted for the operation of
switch means, a yoke at the upper end of the in~
30 sulator and through which the upper shaft ex»
tends, said yoke having a plurality of arms, a
plurality of insulator members arranged in a cir”
cumferentiaiseries about the insulator, ?ttings
at the upper ends oi’ said insulator members piv»
35 otally connected with the yoke arms and ?ttings
at the lower ends of said insulator members piv
otally connected to said base, said insulator mom
bers extending at
acute angle to the insu~
lator and serving to hold it under compression
4.0 and from sldewise movement on its support.
yoke arms, spring means for connecting the lower
ends of said insulator members to the base for
applying a predetermined tension on said insu
later members, said insulator members errtending
at an acute angle to said insulator whereby theyy
serve to hold said insulator under compression
and from sidewise movement on its support"
6. An insulator assembly comprising a base, a
rocketed bearing member mounted on the here,
an insulator rockably mounted on. said bearing
member,
insulator ahaving
yoke carried
a plurality
by the
of upper
circumi‘erenti
spaced radially extending arms, a pinrahty ct r~
sulator members arranged in a oircumferen M
series about the insulator, ?ttings at the unit
ends of said insulator members pivotaliy <1 n,“
lower
nected ends
withofthe
said
yoke
insulator
arms and
members
fittingspivoteiiy
at
connected to said base, said insulator members
extending at an acute angle to the insulator and
having their points of connection to the base ‘far,
ther from the axis of the insulator than the
points of connection to the arms, whereby they
serve to hold said insulator under compression
and. from sidewise movement on its support
ROBERT L,
a
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