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Патент USA US2107521

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Feb. 8, 1938.
c. R. BUSCH
2,107,521
BRAKE SHOE KEY
Filed June 19, 1935
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INVENTOR
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Feb. 8, 1938. j
c. R. BUSCH ’
1107;521
BRAKE SHOE KEY
Filed June 19, 1935
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ATTORNEY
Patented Feb. 8, 1938
2,107,521
- UNl'l‘ED s'rAss PATENT
FFiCE
2,107,521
BRAKE SHOE KEY
Charies Prlsuseh, @range, N. l, assignor to But
falo Brake Beam Compan y, New York, N. Y.,
a corporation of New York
Application June‘ 19, 1935, Serial No. 27,331
14 Claims. (Cl. 188-—243)
The present invention embodies certain im~
provements in brake-shoe keys of the type shown,
described and claimed in my previous applications
Serial No. 550,661,'?led July 14, 1931 and Serial
No. 619,472, ?led June 27, 1932, which have ma
tured respectively into Patent No. 2,328,753, dated
January 28, 1.936 and Patent No. 2,013,981, dated
September 10, 1935, and the principal object of
the invention resides in so constructing the key,
whether‘ it comprises'a single length of spring
metal or two connected lengths of spring metal,
as to provide a non-vibrating or non-chattering
and a self-locking key for holding brake shoes onto
the brake-head, which key in use will not become
dislocated upwardly from its proper locking posi—
tion, and will always act safely in spite of vary
ing conditions in the key-way of the castings
through which the key passes, as well as when
wear has occurred between the castings caused by
the action of the brakes and the vibration of 1“he
looked parts when other types of keys have been
used.
The same being among the objects of ‘the pres
ent invention, the invention consists of certain
features of construction and combinations of
parts, whether in the improved key itself or in a
combination of the improved key with a shoe held
thereby to a brake-head, to be hereinafter de
scribed and then claimed with reference to the
accompanying drawings illustrating certain em
bodiments of the invention, and wherein
Fig. 1 is a broken side elevation of a brake
shoe held on a brake-head by the improved key
shown in Fig. 2;
'
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the key shown in
Fig. l which is a bifurcated or two legged key,
showing the position of the parts of the key when
not under pressure;
Fig. 3 is a front elevation of the key shown in
Fig. 2; ’
‘
front lugs or m embers H, [2, and the brake-shoe
13 is provided with the usual apertured lug or
member M which is to set between the lugs i i , I 2
when the brake-shoe is in proper position on the
head, so as to provide the usual key-way between
them for receiving a key. Under the present in
vention the key may be of the bifurcated type to
comprise two legs l5, it of leaf-spring metal, the
leg it being the front leg and the leg it the rear
leg, and both legs being arranged breadthwise
10
with respect to each other.
The front leg !5 may be suitably shaped and
constructed, but preferably it corresponds with
the front leg shown, described and claimed in my
application Serial No. 550,661, that is, the leg i5
is bent or de?ected outwardly to provide a bear~
ing portion l'l , which deflection results in the
provision of a shoulder I8 at one end of the bear
ing portion ii and a shoulder 19 at its other
end. Furthermore, the spring metal strip or front
leg i5 is provided with a front depression 20 20
which is defined by the aforesaid shoulder H9 at
one end of the depression and by a shoulder 21
at the other end thereof located adjacent the lower
end of the key.
When the key is bifurcated to provide two
spring legs such as l5, It, the upper ends thereof
are bent rearw ardly and suitably connected to
gether to provide a driving or withdrawing lug 22
at the upper end of the key. As shown in Figs. ,
1 and 2, the upper ends of the legs may be con
nected together and combined in the manner
shown, described and claimed in my application
Serial No. 619,472, that is to say there is inserted
between the upper ends of the legs, where they :v. Cl
are of elbow shape, a suitable metal ?ller 22a
constituting a spacer, the rearwardly directed
parts of the lug 22 being connected together by a
rivet 23, and the parts directly below the lug 22
Fig. 4 is a side elevation of a modi?ed construc
being connected together by a rivet 24, so that r
these parts at the upper end of the key are ?rmly
Fig. 5 is a side elevation of a second modi?cation
and solidly united together.
The rear leg i6 is provided with the prin
tion of key;
of the key;
Fig. 6 is a side elevation'of a third modi?cation
of the key;
Fig, 7 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but illustrating
an improved key residing in‘ a single length of
spring metal; and
cipal improved feature of the present invention
and this resides in so curving or bowing the same 45
for substantially its length rearwardly or out
wardly away from the front leg l5 in such man
ner as to locate the greatest
curvature, rear
wardly, away from the lower part of the longi
Figs. 8 and 9 are respectively a side elevation tudinally
extending
and a front elevation of the key of Fig. 7, but front leg. This will bearing portion ll of the
de?ne a location of that
showing it in its free state and not under com
pression.
‘portion of the rearward curve of the rear leg l6
with a curvature of the least radius, at points be
According to Figs. 1, 2, and 3 the brake-head low
the approxi
I0 is provided in the usual manner with apertured is indicated by mate mid-length of the key which
the line A-A in Fig. 2, for the 55
2,107,521
28 is furthermore provided with the same ‘im
purpose to beexplained. Such greatest curvature
proved feature as the key shown in Fig. 2, that
is to say the short leg 28 is provided with a greater
or curvature of least radius is-approximately indi
cated by the bracketed portion 25 in Fig. 2. Fur
curvature or a curvature of least radius at 32
thermore, the rear leg bears at its lower end on
at points below the approximate mid-length of
the lower end of the front leg l5 and is preferably
extended beyond the terminal of the front leg so
the key indicated at A--A. This key will. act
similarly to the key in Fig. 2, except that the
as to provide a leader 28 to facilitate the inser
leader 3! is on the front leg instead of on the .
rear vleg. > There is also aforward shoulder 21a
When a spring key such as shown in Figs. 2
on the lower end of the front leg, inasmuch as 1O
and 3 is fully driven into the key-way of an ' the front leg-Fig. 4, isshown the same as the
10 assembled head H] and shoe 53 (Fig. 1) its driv
front leg in Fig. 2.
;
,
1
ing lug or the like 22 is brought to bear upon
It will be noted that in Fig. 4 the lower ex
tremity of the shorter rear member or leg 28
the upper end of the brake~head ill, the pro
tion of the key into a key-way.
‘
longated bearing portion l? of the front leg is.
extends into a concavity of the longer front mem- '
brought to bear upon the inner surfaces of the
lugs l l, l2, and the rear leg I5 is brought to bear
her or leg 2'! which is produced in the convex
side thereof by reason of the forming of the
shoulder or hump 21a on the concave side of the
upon the inner surface of the cross-piece lilo of
the brake-shoe lug ill. The forcing of the spring
key into the key-way therefore sets'the spring
front ,member, and that the shorter member 28
legs of the key in a state of compression between
the interengaging lugs of the shoe and brake
head and draws the shoe ?rmly uponthe brake
head.
,
As the maximum distance between the spring
‘
legs l5, it is greatest opposite the rearwardly
curved portion 25 of the rear leg, and as there
fore, such extreme curved portion 25 is located
below the shoe lug Ill when the ‘spring-key‘ is in
place, it will be understood that the effective
locking of the key in the key-way is accom
plished by such portion 25, inasmuch as to with
draw the key from the key-way considerable up
ward force must be used in order to compress the
there bears on the member 21.
In Fig. 5 a modi?cation of what is shown in
Fig. 2 is illustrated and the two keys‘ are sub
stantially the same, except that in Fig. 5Tthe front
leg 33 is connected with the rear leg Sdby a loop
35, the entire key being composed of a single
length of leaf-spring metal doubled and bent to
the approximate shape shown, thus providing a
driving or withdrawing loop 35 in the nature of
a lug, but which has a certain amount of springi
ness within itself. In Fig. 5 the lower end of the
front leg is suitably formed so as to provide an
abrupt forward shoulder 330., such as shown
speci?cally'in my application Serial No. 558,661.
shown in Fig. l, as that is necessary in order to
The rear spring leg 34 is formed similarly to the
corresponding leg previously described, that is,
along the length of its curve it is provided'with
underneath the cross-piece lila’of the shoe lug
ing a curve of least radius, located at points below
'two legs together for a less'distance than that
get the curved portion 25 of less radius from
l4. 7 It has been found in practice that when
the thickness of the leaf-spring metal of which
each leg is composed is one-eighth of an inch
and the breadth of each is seven-eighths of an
inch, and the metal pro-perlyrtempered, the im
proved key locked in position as in Fig.1, will not
a more greatly curved portion 36 or portion hav
the approximate mid-lengthA-A. This key will
also act similarly to the keys previously described.
Fig. 6 discloses a still further, modification
wherein instead of making the connection be~
tween the two spring legs 31, 38 at the upper
end of the key, that is at the driving lug portion,
move upwardly and tend to become detached or 7 the connection between the legs is provided by i
loose when such provision as the specially located a bend 39 at the lower ends of the legs, the key
curved portion 25 is inherent in the key. Practice shown in Fig. 6 being formed from a single dou
has shown that the improved key is thoroughly
efficient in service and usually maintains its
locked position, although extra precaution may
be provided by the forward shoulder 21 on the
front leg and by the front depression 2i), although
it would happen very seldom, if at all, that the
improved key would be forced up far enough by
vibration in order to locate the head-lug H! in the
depression 23. It will be observed that while the
improved key is resilient its effective stiffness or
, resistance against its dislocation or looseness is
60
increased by the fact that the rear leg it not
only has a bearing upon the rearwardly de?ected
portion at of the front leg, but also upon the ter
minal of the front leg.
'
'
In Fig. 4.- a modi?ed construction of bifurcated
spring key is illustrated, the front leg 21 and rear
leg 28 being formed from one piece or strip of
spring metal which is doubled or bent over at 29
and provided with a ?ller or spacer 36, the parts
being solidly and ?rmly united together similarly
to the construction in Fig. 2. The front 21 is
similar to the previously described front leg,
whereas the rear leg 28 is curved outwardly or
rearwardly away from the front leg and is shorter
than the front leg so that the front leg may bear
upon the terminal of the rear leg and be extended
to provide a leader St to facilitate the introduc
0 tion of the key‘ into a key-Way. The shorter leg
bled length of leaf-spring metal, wherein the free
ends of the legs are located at the upper end of
the key._ The upper end of the legB'i is bent
rearwardly to provide a rearward portion 40 and
the front leg 38 is bent rearwardly to provide
a rearward portion 4|, such leg 38 also having a
forwardly deflected portion 42. It will be seen
that the forwardly de?ected portion 42 bears upon ‘
a portion of thefront leg 3‘! and that the rear
wardly bent portions 40, 4| bear, upon each other,
they constituting means for driving or withdraw
ing the key. When the key of Fig. 6 is intro (50
duced into a key-way of a brake-head‘ and shoe it
will act similarly to the ‘previously, described
forms, except that in inserting the key the por
tions 4D, 4! will move relatively to each other
with some friction.
'
Of course it is preferred that the spring key
of Fig. 6 be provided along its rearwardly curved
rear leg 38 with a' portion 53 of greater curva
ture, or a portion of least radius, located below
the approximate mid-length A-A.
' g
'
It should be mentioned that while the line A-A
in the already described figures is supposed to
indicate the approximate mid-length of each
key, transversely thereof, it more nearly repre
sents that portion of each key which extends 75
2,107,521
ing or moving up of the key when sudden shocks
In Figs. '7, 8, and 9 the key instead of having
to a car truck or car are caused, as when dumping
two legs of leaf-spring metal is made of one
length 44 of preferably leaf-spring metal formed
and bent to substantially the shape in side ele
vation in Fig. 8; that is, the spring key when free
from pressure will have a normal set substantially
as shown at’ the upper end of key 44 as a rear
10
3
above the lower edge of the shoe lug when the
key is in proper using position.
wardly bent driving lug 45 and is substantially
straight ‘as shown at 46-for approximately one
third of the length of the key, the intermediate
or'middle portion of the key being curved rear
, wardly, and the rearward curvature being such as
15, to locate the maximum curve or the curve of
least radius along the bracketed portion 41, so
that the portion 4'! is located below the approxi
mate mid-length of the key indicated at 3-3.
The lower portion 48 of the key 44 is de?ected
forwardly so'that below the upper portion 46 of
the key the remainder thereof is preferably
formed on a compound curve, with the greatest
rearward curvature approximately at 41.
' The spring key with a single length of spring
metal should be thicker and stronger than the
corresponding rear leg of the described bifurcated
keys and the thickness may be one and one-half
or twice that of the rear leg referred to. When
the single leg key is driven into using position
shown in Fig. 7, a part of its straight portion 46
“will bear on the lug 5| of the brake head 50 and
the key will also bear upon the lower portion of
the cross-piece 54 of the shoe lug, the more
prominent portion, that is to say the more greatly
curved part of the key being positioned directly at
and below the lower corner of the shoe lug 54,
and furthermore the upper end 'of I the spring key
44 will bear upon the upper end of the brake‘head
50 while the lower portion 48 of the key will bear
40 forwardly upon a toe lug or cross-piece 55 upon the
lower end of the brake head 50. Hence this modi
?red form of spring key will be in strong bearing
relation with the upper and lower ends of the
brake shoe head 50 and with the shoe lug 54, so
as to ?rmly draw the shoe 53 up to the head 50.
At the same time the portion 4‘! of the spring key
44 and which is of less radius than the general
rearward curve of the key, will be positioned di
a load of coal or the like, for in such cases the
sudden shocks cause the common standard type
of brake shoe keys to be loosened and frequently
to jump up so as to disconnect the brake shoes
from their heads.
_
What I claim as new is:
1. In combination, a brake head and a shoe
having a key-way and inter-engaged apertured 10
members, the apertures registering with one an
other, and a key in the key-way and passing
through the apertures, and including two broad
legs of spring metal relatively arranged breadth
wise at different distances from the shoe, and
means connecting the legs, the leg further from
the shoe being so curved away from the other leg
as to dispose its greatest curvature longitudinally
of the key at points below the apertured member
of the shoe.
2. In combination, a brake head and a shoe
having a key-way and inter-engaged apertured
members, the apertures registering with one an
other, and a key in the key-way and passing
through the apertures, and including two broad ‘'3
legs of spring metal relatively arranged breadth
wise at different distances from the shoe, and
means connecting the legs, the leg further from
the shoe being so curved away from the other leg
as to dispose its greatest curvature longitudinal- "
ly of the key at points below the apertured mem
ber of the shoe, and one of the spring legs having
an outward shoulder located towards the lower
end of such leg and beyond the apertured mem
bers.
G2 at
3. A brake-shoe key, including two legs of leaf
spring metal and means connecting the spring
legs, one in front of the other, both legs curved
in the same direction in the position which they
occupy and the rear leg being so curved away 4 0
from the other leg as to dispose its greatest curva
ture longitudinally of the key at points below the
mid-length of the key.
'
4. A brake-shoe key, including two legs of leaf
spring metal and means connecting the spring
legs, one in front of the other, both legs curved
in the same direction in the position which they
rectly below the shoe lug 54, with the result that
the vibration of the parts supporting the key will
not dislodge the key from its locked position and
the same will be held there until it is removed by
suitable tools.
occupy and the rear leg being so curved away
from the other leg as to dispose its greatest
curvature longitudinally of the key at points be- ;
low the mid-length of the key, and one of the
legs having at its outer in-curved side an out
It will be seen from Figs. '7 and 8 that the illus
and the free end of such leg.
5. A brake-shoe key, including two legs, each .
trated key is provided with a forward shoulder 49
which interlocks under the toe lug 55 when the
key is driven into place so that such engage
ment also may assist in preventing the key from
moving upwards due to vibration of the parts.
The‘fgreatest curvature or curvature which has
least radius in the key and which is indicated at
ward shoulder located between the connecting
of leaf-spring metal and means connecting them,
both legs curved in the same general direction
forms, when the key is applied to a brake head and
in the position which they occupy, and the leg
which is curved outwardly away from the other
leg having a curve of less radius than the curve
of such other leg, both legs being ?exible from
end to end, the radius of the curve of that leg
a brake shoe, causes the key to act as a wedge
which is of less radius having a curve of still less
25, 32, 36, 43, and ill in the various illustrated
member which exerts its greatest force below the
brake shoe lug, which action is the reverse of that
of the common standard type of brake shoe key,
whose wedge member exerts its greatest force
above the brake shoe lug, thus tending to release
70 itself due to vibration. It is to be expected that
such extreme curvatures, located as described
and shown, will prevent the key from moving up
during the travel of the train or car, but the lower
forward shoulder shown and described is a
75 de?nite measure of precaution against the jump
radius at points below the mid-length of the key.
6. A brake-shoe key, the same being formed
from leaf-spring metal, and comprising two legs
which are mutually opposed broadside, and means
connecting corresponding ends of the legs and
serving as means for driving or withdrawing the
key, the terminal of the forward leg bearing upon 70
the other leg, and the terminal of such other leg
extending beyond the bearing point to form a
leader.
7. A brake-shoe key, including two legs of
leaf-spring metal and means connecting the 15
‘2,107,521
spring legs and holding them breadthwise one in
' advance of the other, the rear leg being so curved
the shoulder being in bearing, relation with the
lower end of the brake-hem.
_
11. A key for connecting brake shoes to brake
away from the other leg as to dispose its greatest heads and formed of strip metal comprising‘ a
curvature longitudinally of the key at points be
long member and a resilient short member, said
low the mid-length of the key, one of the leaf
members being curved lengthwise and the short
legs having an outward shoulder located between member being ofgreater curvature than the long
the connecting means and the free end of such member, said long member having towards its
leg.
extremity a hump on its concaved side forming
I , 8. Abrake-shoe key, including twovoppositely
acting legs of spring metal connected together
at one end of the key and free at the other end,
one leg located in advance of the other leg, and
a concavity on its convex side, and the extrem ,10
ity of said short member terminating within said 7
concavity.
the other leg-bowed between its ends for a con
, siderable part of its length relatively to and out
15 wardly from the advance leg, the maximum dis
. 12. A key for connecting brake shoes to brake V
heads, comprising a longmember and a resil
ient short member, said members being curved
~
lengthwiserand the short member being of greater
tancebetween the two legs being the greatest be-_ curvature than the long member, said long mem
low the approximate. mid-lengths thereof.
her having towards its extremity a bump on its
In combination, a brake-head and a shoe 7 concaved side forming a concavity on its convexv
having a, key-way and interengaging apertured'
members, the apertures registering with one an
side, and the extremity of said short member
other, and a key including a length of spring
terminating within said concavity.
V
n 13. A key for connecting brake shoes to brake
' metal substantially co-extensive with the length 7
heads, comprising a long member and a resilient
of the key-way and extending breadthwise of
the apertures, and having an outward shoulder
formed integrally therewith and located towards
the lower end thereof beyond the apertured
short member,saidmembers being curved length
wise
the short member being of, greater
curvature than the long member, said long mem
her having towards its extremity a hump on its
having engagement with a concavedrside forming a concavity on its convex
part of the head above the outward shoulder, _ side, and the extremity of said short member ter
~ members, said key
such key being bent rearwardly on a curve which
30 has its least radius at points below the mid
Tminating within said concavity, the radius of the
curve of the shortmember being less at points
length ‘thereof and directly below that partwof ‘below the midlength of the key.
the key which bears on the apertured member ~'
of the shoe.
>
14.
brake-shoe key, as an article of 11181113:
faoture, including a strip of spring metal of a
10. In combination, a brake-head and a shoe length suf?cient to pass through, and at both
vends beyond, the connecting lugs of a brake-shoe
aligned openings, and a key for securing the shoe and its supporting brake-head, and such a strip
being preformed for insertion through such con
snuglyv on the head and
I including a length of
necting lugs by being bent rearwardly on a curve
sumcient
extent
to
pass
through
‘n spring metal of
such lugs and beyond them, and the key having whichin the-using position of the key'will be
‘an outward shoulder formed integrally‘ there . directed towards that surface of the shoe lug
with and being "cent rearwardly on a curve which whereon the strip will ultimately bear,'and which
‘curve has its leastradius at points directly be
has its least radius at’ points below, the mid
low that part of the strip which is to ultimately
I’ , having inter?tting attaching lugs provided with
1 length of the‘ key and above the shoulder, the
. upper end of the spring key being in bearing re=
lation with the upper end of the brake-head and
bear on the lug of the brake shOe.
CHARLES R. BUSCH.
25
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