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Патент USA US2107848

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Feb. 8, 1938.
E. 1.. BARRETT
CIRCUIT CONTROLLING DEVI CE
Filed Nov. 14, 1936
2,107,843
2,107,848
Patented Feb. 8, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,107,848
CIRCUIT CONTROLLING DEVICE
Edward L. Barrett, La Grange, Ill., assignor to
Utah Radio Products Company, Chicago, 111., a
corporation of Illinois
. Application November 14, 1936, Serial No. 110,875
12 Claims.
(Cl. ZOO-87)
The invention relates to electric circuit con
trolling devices and more particularly to such
devices commonly designated as electromagnetic.
relays.
.
A general object of the invention is to provide
a new.and improved device of this type which
is not only especially compact and small in its
over-all dimensions but also made up of only a few
component parts, each of which may be manu
10 factured very cheaply in large quantities, these
advantages being had, however, without any sac
ri?ce in sensitivity or effectiveness of operation
of the ?nished device.
Another object ofthe invention is to provide
15 such a device in which a major portion of the
component parts may be formed from sheet
metal by simple stamping operations.
A further object of the invention is to provide
a device of the type described which permits of
O0 sufficiently large tolerances in the outline di
mensions of its component parts so that they
may be .fashioned by stamping operations with
out subsequent machining and without adversely
affecting the sensitivity of the completed device,
05 and in which uniform operating characteristics
may be had for a large number of devices made
by quantity production methods.
Further objects and advantages of the inven
tion will become apparent as the following de
5
scription proceeds and the features‘ of novelty
which characterize the invention are pointed out
with particularity in the claims annexed to and
forming a part of the speci?cation.
For a better understanding of the invention,
5 reference may be had to the accompanying draw
ing in which,
Figure 1 is a perspective view of a relay unit
embodying ‘the invention, the enclosing casing
and mounting for the relay being indicated in
4Q dot-dash lines.
v
Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the relay
shown in Fig. 1.
7
~
Fig. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the
relay shown in Figs. 1 and 2.
45
For purposes of illustration, the invention has
been shown as embodied in a small compact re
lay adapted for use in electric control circuits of
various sorts. The relay illustrated includes as.
_
its principal elements a frame designated gener
50 ally by the numeral 10 carrying an electromag
netic energizing winding I l and a movable arma
ture II. The armature serves to effect relative
movement between ‘a pair of cooperating con
tacts l3 and “in response to energization of the
55 actuating winding ll. '
The frame is preferably a one piece structure
which includes a part forming a magnetizable
core forthe actuating winding II, as well as a
part forming a support for the armature l2. In
the preferred construction illustrated, the frame 5
I0 is generally F-shaped in form, thus including
a c-shaped portion for the relay proper and an
upright supporting leg l5. The C-shaped por
tion of the frame is made up of a central or up
right leg l6 having laterally extending legs l1 l0
and I8 projecting in spaced relation from its op
posite ends. Such a frame may be readily formed
by stamping the same from light metal stock
having a relatively high magnetic permeability.
Soft sheet iron having a high magnetic permeability and low retentivity, is suitable for this
purpose. The generally ?at contour of the frame
l0 adds materially to its simplicity of manufac-a
ture.
The electromagnetic energizing winding II is
preferably wound in place rather than being pre
formed. In the construction illustrated, a pair
of coil retaining end members [9 and 20 fash
ioned by stamping from insulating sheet mate
rial are disposed in spaced relation on the cen
tral leg l6 of the frame Ill. Suitable centrally
located apertures 2| and 22 are formed in the
coil end members l9 and 210, respectively, these
apertures being of sufficient size that the end
members may be slipped over the frame leg I‘!
and onto the central frame leg Hi. When in po
sition on the central leg IS, the end member 20
abuts against the lateral leg I8 and a shoulder
23 formed. in the frame while the opposite end
member l9 abuts against the second laterally
extending leg l1.
15
20
30
35
_
An improved and simpli?ed contact support
ing arrangement is preferably utilized to pre
vent skewing of the coil and member l9. ‘This
arrangement includes a ?at stamped piece of 40
insulating material 24, such as fabric reenforced
Bakelite, which may be secured to the frame [0
in face-‘to-face relation therewith by rivets 25
passing through alined apertures 26 and 21 in
the piece of insulating material and frame. In 45
assembling the relay illustrated, the coil end
members l9 and 20 are ?rst slipped on the frame
and then the piece of insulating material 24 is
riveted in place. The member 24 projects lat
erally from the frame forming in effect a shoul- 50
der corresponding to the shoulder 23. The coil
end members may be held in spaced relation by
a piece of kraft paper wound around the frame
leg I6 between them. The coil II is then formed
by winding ?ne insulated wire about the frame 55
2
2,107,848
between the coil end members. In performing
this winding operation, the projecting end l5 of
the frame l0 may be readily secured in the
chuck of‘an automatic winding machine.
The elongated rigid armature I 2 preferably
has a free ?oating pivotal mounting so that the
relay will have a high degree of sensitivity. In
general, the armature I2 is disposed substantial
ly in the plane of the frame In and extends be
tween the laterally projecting arms I‘! and I9.
In order to simplify its construction, the arma
ture [2 may also be fashioned as a stamping from
light gauge sheet metal stock having a high
magnetic permeability and low retentivity such
15 as soft iron. Upon reference to Fig. 3, it will be
seen that the armature illustrated is generally
flat in shape and has an enlarged lower end
28 provided with outwardly extending ears 29.
The ears or projections 29 are inter?tted with
complementally formed projections on the frame
to provide a loose pivotal mounting. To this
end, an L-shaped stamped sheet metal member
30 is secured to the frame arm l8 by a rivet 3|
passing through registering apertures 32 and
25 33. A corresponding enlarged aperture 34 is
formed in the armature l2 so that the head of
the rivet will not interfere with the movement of
the armature. Laterally extending ears or pro
jections 35 on the member 30 overlie the ears 29
30 on the armature l2, thus preventing upward
movement thereof. The opposite or free end of
the armature l2 overlies the frame arm) IT.
Consequently, when the winding II is energized,
the frame arm I1 will be magnetized and attract
35 the adjacent end of the armature.
Resilient means is provided for ‘yieldably bias
ing the armature I2 against movement toward
headed non~magnetic screw 39 constitutes a
convenient method of providing such a stop.
This screw is threaded in a tapped hole 40 formed
in the frame arm I‘! and passes through an aper
ture 4| in the armature I2. An eyelet 4|“ made
of brass or‘other- non-magnetic material is in
serted in the hole H. The inner ?ange on the
eyelet prevents direct contact between the arma
ture and frame so that the armature will not be
retained in closed position by residual magnet 10
ism. The inside diameter of the eyelet 4|‘l is
substantially larger than that of the shank of
the screw 39. In assembling the relay at the
point of manufacture, the screw 39 is adjusted
until the spacing. between the contacts I3 and I4
is set at a desired amount. The screw 39 may
be rigidly ?xed in this position by a drop of solder
42 (Fig. 2) on its inner end.
As was previously noted, a very simple contact
supporting structure is herein contemplated.
so
The contact insulator 24 may be readily formed
by stamping, or some similar operation, from a
sheet of insulating material and the use of the
usual screw-machine made insulating parts is
obviated. The contacts l3 and I4 are preferably I: 3.1
made of silver and are generally cylindrical in
shape. The relatively ?xed contact I4 is se
cured to the outer end of an electrically con
ductive metal spring finger 43 made of phosphor
bronze or the like. This spring ?nger is fastened iii)
to the piece of insulation 24 by suitable rivets
passing through registering holes 44 and 45 while
the projecting outer end 46 of the spring ?nger
constitutes a terminal lug. The movable con
tact i3 is secured to the outer end of the arma
the armature and the frame. One end of the
spring is secured to the armature by a book 31
ture l2 and for this purpose, has a shank portion
which is inserted in a registering hole 41 formed
in the free end of the armature, the outer end
of the contact point shank being peened over
the adjacent edges of the-hole. The spring ?nger 40
L-shaped member 30.
a plug-type mounting in order to facilitate its
the magnetizable frame arm l1. Thus, an elon
gated helical tension spring 36 extends between
24 is su?iciently distortable to permit adjust
struck up from the side-thereof and the opposite _ ment of the contact spacing.
end of the spring is secured to an ear'39 on the
The relay described is preferably provided with
The hook 31 projects a
45 substantial distance above the armature so that '
insertion and removal in associated apparatus.
the spring tension will be applied with a good The mounting plug shown in Fig. 1 includes an
leverage. It has been found that much more insulating disk 48 having conductive metal
uniform operation will be had for relays of the prongs 49 projecting from its lower side and
type described produced in large quantities when - adapted to be received in a complemental plug
50 a spring is used having a comparatively large
receptacle. A laterally extending ear 50 projects
number of turns. The spring 36 illustrated has from the lower end l5 of the relay frame l0 and 50
approximately forty turns. When a spring hav
ing turns of this general order of magnitude is
used, the over-all strength of the spring will be
55 about the same even though the strength of one
or two of the individual turns may vary some
what due to slight inaccuracies in the manufac
turing operations performed thereon. Also when
the spring is stretched during operation the dis
60 tortion of each ‘individual turn is minimized be
cause of the distribution of the stretching
throughout a large number of turns. Upon ref
erence to Fig. 2, it will be seen that the spring
36 is arranged at an acute angle with respect to
The elongation of the arma
ture 12 makes it possible to utilize a long spring
without the necessity of providing a separate se
curing member for its outer end.
65 the armature I2.
A ?xed stop limits the oscillatory path of
70 movement of the armature l2. This stop is pref
erably disposed out of contact with the arma
ture except at the outer extremity of its path of
movement so that the sensitivity of therelay will
not be affected by friction between the stop and
75 the armature. In the construction illustrated, a
one of the prongs 49 projects through an aper~
ture 5| therein. The relay is thus rigidly secured
in position on the plug insulating disk 48. A
cylindrical cup-shaped casing 52 surrounds the
relay when thus mounted.
In case the relay is to be used in the proximity
of radio apparatus, the casing may be made of
metal in order to. shield the radio apparatus from
radio frequency oscillation set up by the action of
the contacts l3 and H.
In the operation of the device described above,
current is supplied at will from a control circuit
to the actuating winding II through conductors
53 and 54 which arerespectively connected to
two of the plug prongs 49. One terminal of the
circuit to be controlled is connected to the fixed
contact l4 through one of the plug prongs 49,
conductor 55, and mounting ?nger 43. ‘The other
terminal of the controlled circuit is connected to
the movable contact l3 through one of the plug
prongs 49 which is secured to the relay frame, a
pig-tail connection 55 and armature I 2. When
the actuating winding l I is energized, a magnetic
?eld is set up thereby in the frame Ill, thus at
an
ment of said contacts in response to energization
of said winding, and means for pivotally support
tracting the armature l2 and causing the con
tacts is and is to be closed. As soon as the
actuating winding ii is deenergized, the arma
ture is again moved to its open position by the
ing one end of said armature on one of said lat
erally extending legs and with the other end
thereof overlying the second laterally extending
biasing spring 36.
From the foregoing, it will be apparent that
,10
frame leg.
'
.
4. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in
a circuit controlling device has been provided
combination, a flat frame fashioned'from a single
which is extremely compact and small inits over
all dimensions and which can be cheaply manu 'piece of sheet metal and having a generally 0
shaped portion including a centralleg with lat 10
factured. The minimization of the cost of manu
facture is, in a large part, due to the fact‘ that
a major number of the component parts can "be
formed by simple stamping operation and in ad
dition, the design is such that fine machining and
Al
15 ‘careful adjustment of parts is not required.
though a particular preferred embodiment of the
invention has been shown and described, in some
detail for purposes of illustration, there is no
intention to thereby limit the invention 'to such
20 embodiment but, on the other hand, the appended
claims are intended to cover all modi?cations
within the spirit and scope of the invention. ‘
I claim:
erally extending legs projecting from opposite
ends thereof, a flat sheet material coil retaining
end member having an aperture therein adapting
the same to be slipped over one of said laterally
extending frame legs and positioned on said cen 15
tral leg in abutment with the adjacent laterally
extending leg, a flat piece of insulating material
secured to said frame in face-to-face relation
therewith and in abutment with said coil end
20
, member to prevent skewing thereof, a contact
'
1. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in com
.25 bination, a flat frame fashioned from a single
piece of sheet metal and having a generally 6-»
shaped portion including a central leg with 1at~>
erally‘ extending legs projecting from opposite
ends thereof, an electromagnetic energizing
winding- disposed about said central leg, a pair of
cooperating relatively movable contacts, means.
including an elongated rigid armature member'
disposed substantially in the plane of said frame
for effecting relative movement of said contacts
carried by a projecting portion of said piece of
insulating material, a second contact cooperating
with said ?rst-named contact, an energizing coil
wound about said central frame leg in abutment
_ with vsaid coil end member, means including an 25
elongated rigid armature member disposed sub
stantially in the plane of ‘said frame for effecting’
relative movement between said contacts in re
sponse to energization of said winding, and means
. for pivotally supporting one end of said armature 30
on one of said laterally extending legs and with
the other end thereof overlying the second lat
erally projecting frame leg.
'
.
'
,
5. An' electromagnetic relay comprising, in
combination, a flat frame fashioned from a single 35 in response to energization. of said winding, and -
means for pivotally supporting one end of said
armature onone of said laterally extending legs
piece of sheet metal and having a magnetic core
0nd laterally extending frame leg.
2. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in
on said frame in alignment with one of said legs
and on the opposite side of said- core portion
therefrom, a pair of flat sheet material coil re
taining end members having apertures therein _
adapting the same to be slipped over the other
portion with laterally extending legs projecting
and with the other end thereof overlying the sec- ‘ from opposite ends thereof, a shoulder formed
combination, a flat frame fashioned from a single
piece of sheet metal and-having a generally 6
shaped portion including a central leg with lat
erally extending legs projecting from opposite
ends thereof, an electromagnetic energizing
winding disposed about said central leg, a flat
piece of insulating material secured to said frame
in face-to-face relation therewith and projecting
therefrom, a contact carried by the projecting
50 portion of said piece of insulating material, a
second contact cooperating with said,?rst-named
contact,‘ an electromagnetic energizing winding
disposed about said central. frame leg, means in
cluding an elongated rigid armature member
disposed substantially in the plane of said frame
_ for effecting relative movement of said second
contact in response to energization of said wind
ing, and means for pivotally'supporting one end
of said armature on one of said laterally extend
ing legs and with the other end thereof overlying
the second laterally extending frame leg.?
3. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in‘
combination, a flat frame fashioned from a sin~ _
-’gle piece of sheet metal and having a generally
C-shaped portion including a central leg with.
of said legs and disposed in spaced relation on
said frame core portion, one of said end mem
bers being positioned in abutment with said
shoulder and said one laterally extending leg‘, the
other of said end members being_,positioned in
abutment with said other leg, a flat piece of
insulating material secured to said frame in face 50
to-face relation therewith and in abutment withv
said last-named coil end member to prevent
skewing thereof, a contact carried by a project
ing portion of said piece’ of insulating material,
a second contact cooperating with said first
named contact, an energizing coil wound about
said frame core portion between said coil end.
members, and means including an armature
member mounted on said frame for effecting rela
tive movement between said contacts in response 60
to energization of said winding.
ii. An electromagnetic relay- comprising, in
combination, a ?at frame fashioned from a single
piece of sheet metal and having a generally 6
shaped portion including a central leg with lat
65
laterally extending legs projecting from opposite erally extending legs projecting from opposite
ends thereof, an electromagnetic energizing
ends thereof, a pair of coil retaining end mern- }
bers disposed in spaced relation on said central winding disposed about said central leg, a pair
frame leg and in abutment with the adjacent of cooperating relatively movable contacts,
laterally
extending legs, an energizing coil wound means including an elongated rigid sheet metal 70
70
armature member disposed substantially in the
about said center leg between said coil end mem
bars, a pair of cooperating relatively movable
contacts, means including an elongated rigid ar
' mature member disposed substantially in the
75 plane of said frame for effecting relative more
plane of said frame for effecting relative move
ment between said contacts in response to ener
gization of said winding, and means including
interiitting projections on one end of said arma
9,107,848
ture and on one of said laterally extending frame
legs for supporting said armature for free float
ing pivotal movement toward and away from the
plane of said frame and with the free end of said
armature member overlying the second laterally
extending frame leg.
7. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in
combination, a ?at frame fashioned froma single
piece of sheet metal and having a generally 6
10 shaped portion including a central leg with lat
erally extending legs ‘projecting from opposite
ends thereof, an electromagnetic energizingwind
ing disposed about said central leg, a pair of
cooperating relatively movable contacts, means
including an elongated rigid sheet metal arma
ture member disposed substantially in the plane
of said frame for effecting relative movement
between said contacts in response to energize
tion of said winding, and means including inter
?tting projections on one end of said armature
and on one of said laterally extending frame legs
for supporting said armature for free ?oating
pivotal movement toward and away from the
plane of said frame and‘ with the free end of
[3 in said armature member overlying the second lat
erally extending frame leg, said armature hav
ing an aperture therein, and a headed screw
threaded in said frame and positioned in said
aperture with the shank thereof out of contact
with the edges of said aperture for limiting the
amplitude of movement of said armature by con
tact thereof against the head of said screw.
8. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in com
bination, a ?at frame fashioned as a stamping
from a single portion of sheet metal having a
relatively high magnetic permeability and low
retentivity, said frame having a substantially
40
ture member disposed substantially in the plane
of said frame for effecting relative movement
between said contacts in response to energization
of said winding, and means for pivotally support
ing said armature on said frame for movement
toward and away from the plane of said frame.
10. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in
combination, a ?at frame fashioned as a stamp
ing from a single portion of sheet metal having
a relatively high magnetic permeability and low 10
retentivity and including two angularly disposed
members lying in the same plane, an energizing
winding disposed about a portion of said flat
frame forv setting up an electromagnetic field
therein, a pair of cooperating relatively movable
contacts, means including a movably mounted
?at rigid sheet metal armature member disposed
substantially in the plane of said frame and co
operating with said angularly disposed frame
members for establishing a substantially closed
low reluctance flux path linking said winding,
and means including said armature for effect
ing relative movement between said contacts in
response to energization of said winding.
ll. An electromagnetic relayv comprising, in
combination, a flat frame fashioned as a stamp
ing from a single piece of sheet metal in a gen
erally F-shaped form, an electromagnetic en
ergizing winding disposed about the upright por
tion of said ‘frame betweenthe laterally extend
ing arms thereon, a pair of cooperating relatively
movable contacts, means including an elongated
rigid armature member disposed substantially in
the plane of said frame for effecting relative
movement of said contactsin response to en
ergization of said winding, and means for secur
ing the lower end of the upright portion of said
rectangular coil portion and a laterally extending
leg projecting from one end of said core por~
frame to a suitable mounting member.
tion, an energizing winding disposed about said
combination, a flat frame fashioned as a stamp
ing from a single piece of sheet metal in a gen
erally F-shaped form, an electromagnetic en
frame core portion, a pair of cooperating rela
tively movable contacts, means including a mov
ably mounted ?at rigid sheet metal armature
member disposed substantialiy in the plane of
said frame and cooperating with said frame core
portion and leg for establishing a closed low
reluctance flux path linking said winding, and
means including said armature for effecting rela
tive movement between said contacts in response
to energization of said winding.
-
‘
9. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in com
bination, a ?at frame fashioned as a stamping
from a single portion of sheet metal having a
relatively high ,magnetic permeability and low
retentivity, an electromagnetic energizing wind
ing disposed about a portion of said frame, a
pair of cooperating relatively movable contacts,
means including va ?at rigid sheet metal arma
30
12. An electromagnetic relay comprising, in
ergizing Winding disposed about the upright por
tion of said frame between the laterally extend
ing arms thereon, a pair of cooperating relatively
movable contacts, means including an elongated
rigid armature member disposed substantially in
the plane of said frame for effecting relative
movement of said contacts in response to en—
ergization of said winding, a mounting plug in
cluding an insulating member having electrically 50
conductive prongs projecting therefrom adapted
to be detachably received in a complementary
plug receptacle, a projection formed on the lower
end of said upright frame portion, and means
for rigidly securing said projection to said mount~
ing plug.
EDWARD L. BARRETT.
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