close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2107853

код для вставки
Peli. s, 193s.
G. E. COFFEY
FLOOR RACK
2,107,853
Feb. 8, 1938.
G. E. COFFEY
2,107,853
FLOOR RACK
Filed July 10, 1936
i
' 3 Sheets-Sheet 2
f
@d @100m/bol@
@@ï
k
7
,
- Feb. 8, 1938.
'
'
G. E. coFFEY
I
2,107,853
FLOOR RACK
Filed July 10, 1956
3 Sheets_sheet 3
2,101,853
Patented Feb. 8,~ v1938
UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE
noon mex _
" George E. Coney, Chicago, Ill., assigner to Harold
'
S. RussclL‘Chicago, Ill.
Application July 10, 193s, semi No. 90,018'
9 Claims.
The floor rack of the- present invention is in
tended'primarily for use of the floors of refrig
erator cars or the like and to be substituted in
place of the wooden ñoor racks now commonly
li
in
use.
'
`
(Cl. 20-78)
or fabricated to afford upstanding ribs i3 in the
nature of slats which are separated from one
another by valleys~ I4. The ribs comprise flat
top walls i5, all of which lie in the same plane
to present a flush surface for the support of the
The floor rack of the present invention together ` kegs, boxes, crates, packages or the like, which
with Ithe supports therefor are of metallic con- ' constitute the lading of the car. The ribs also
,_
struction, which possesses positive advantages in
comparison with Wooden floor racks, in that the
danger of distortion due to swelling or shrinking
is eliminated; so that a more even and uniform
surface is present-cd for the storage and move
ment of the commodities housed within the car or
comprise upstanding side walls I6 which are con
nected'by base walls i1 constituting the floors of
the valleys between the ribs. The terminal rib 10
of a panel has the lower edge of its outer side
wall inturned to afford a flange i8, leaving an
open space or gap between the panel and the next
_other structure. The present invention,> more-f contiguous panel in the same section of the floor.
dm` to splinter-ing or other injury to the floor sur
face by reason of inequalities which might serve
as abutments or obstructions in the shifting of
the load and which, in the case of wooden floors,
The top walls i5 are provided with lines of aper
tures I9 each of which has a downturned marginal
flange 20, which serves to reinforce and stiffen
the construction. 'I‘he gaps between the panels
are of equal width with the valleys, so that the
spacing of the Slat-like ribs is uniform from end
constitutes a serious objection. '
cto end of the car floor.
' ovrr. makes provision for increased circulation of
air and eliminates ythe possibility of impairment
A further advantage lies in the fact that the
` ' metallic slats are of uniform thickness, so that,
in the case of repair or replacement, exact di-y
mensions will be maintained, which accurate fit
vting is often -omitted in the repairing of wooden
slatted ñoors where new slats of non-uniform
'thickness‘are employed asreplacements, .result
no'. Further yobjects and details of the present in--
provided to enable this section to be folded in
vention will appear from a description thereof in
be swung up into the position shown in dotted 30
lines in Fig. 2 against the side wall of the car, the
conjunction with the accompanying drawings,
sections being mounted upon hinges 22;
wherein,--
'
' '
Fig., 1 is‘a plan'view showing the slatted sur
35 / face of a refrigerator car floor, the view showing
one halfk of the length of the car;
_
Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation of the same, show
In order to increase the circulation of air, the
floors of the valleys between the ribs are provided
with elongated apertures 23, which gives to the 35
slatted construction as a whole the character of
ing the manner of folding the slatted sections into
a foraminous surface to facilitate the flow of air
without sacrifice’ of the stiffness and rigidity re
vertical relation to the car walls;
quired in a structure of this character.
‘
Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail showing the pre
ferred construction of the slatted panels;
Fig. 4 is a sectional elevation taken on line Il--l
of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a sectional detail taken on lineîä ofv
45
to the transverse center line of the car and ad
jacent to the car door, and the hinges 2| are ‘
wardly upon the adjacent section A. which may
ing in inequalities in» the ñoor surface.
40
The innermost section A, as shown, has hinged
thereto a center section B connected by hinges
2i with the contiguous section A. The hinged
section B occupies a space immediately adjacent 25
Fig. 3; .
,
.
Fig.y 6 is a plan view of a modified form of con
struction;
l
-
\
~
_
Fig. 7 is an edge view of the same; and '
` Fig. B is a sectional detail taken on line IL-l4
Referring particularly to the construction first
q illustrated, the slatted flooring of the car consists
.
The slatted sections', each comprising three
vpanels in the form shown, are supported upon
stringers 24 which, as shown, extend lengthwise
of the car and which are of channel construction
standing on edge to afford a vertical wall 25, and
. top and bottom walls 26 and 21, which latter are
reinforced at recurrent intervals by vertical plates
2l provided with flanges 29, which rplates consti
tute spacers and which are preferably spot welded
in position to further strengthen the stringers to
thenecessary extent. As shown, the stringers
are imperforate, since they extend lengthwise of
-the car and do not obstruct the ñow of air be
of aplurality'oi sections A each of which consists
_of slatted panels l0, il , I2. Each panel is in
neath the lading, although, if desired, the walls
oi.' the stringers 24 may be provided with aper
tegrally formed of plate metal which is pressed
tures.
v
50
2,107,853
The hinges 2! comprise hinge members Il in
the form of brackets secured to the floor sections
in conjunction with ilxed brackets Il of anzu
_lar` formation fitted into ythe angle between the
floor and the. wall of the car, which members are
pivoted together upon a pintle 32. It is preferred
to spot weld the panels directly to the stringers,
-Furthermore, the employment of metal elim
inates the absorption of moisture with resultant
fodors, which >in _the case of wooden slatted «cars
vare frequently present and difficult to eliminate,
and are most objectionable in the transportation
although other means of securement may be em
offfoodstuffs or the like which may be contam
inated by such odors.
_
'I'hel construction employing vintegral panels
possesses certain special advantages in reduction
ployed.
Although in the oonstruouon described, theV of manufacturing costs and in rigidity of con
10
stringers run 'lengthwise thereof, a vreversal of
this arrangement is contemplated if desired, and
struction, since the spacing of the slats is in'
herent in the'panel itself and is not dependent'
upon the connection of the slats to the string
' it is not the intention to limit the invention to
ers as in the case of the individually formed slats.
slatted surfaces run crosswise of the car, and the
the arrangement shown by way of exempliilca
tion in the drawings.
`
ì
The construction shown in Fig. 6 illustrates a
siat arrangement in which ythemetallic slats 33
run lengthwiœ of the car and are supported upon
20 stringers 36 running cros’swise ci’ the car. In
>this construction, instead of providing a multi
plicity of slats in the form of ribs struck' up
wardly from an integral plate of metal, the slats
_are individually formed, e'ach 'slat comprising a
top wall 35 and side walls or flanges 36,',which
I are inturned at their lower edges to afford flanges'
..30
Furthermore, by maintaining accurate spacing`
of the slats. the gaps between the same may
.be reduced to the extent necessary to prevent
-the 4lodgment of materials between the slats, and
by the maintenance of uniformity in the plane '
of the slatted floor surface, the movement and
storing of commodities is facilitated.
Although the invention 'l has been' described
with particularity as to detail, it is not the in
tention to limit the invention to the forms of
construction shown, since modifications thereof
are 'within the scope of the invention.
31 which rest upon the underlying stringers. In
I claim:
this case the individual slats are provided in
1. A slatted iloor for cars or the like, compris
their top walls with flanged apertures 38 .like
those first described.
In order to holdthe stringers 34 in elevated
relation to the car floor, each of the stringers is
provided with feet 39 which, as shown, are of
I trough-shaped formation comprising a base 60
35 and diverging side walls> 4i 'which are spot weld
ed or otherwise connected aty their upper edges
to the stringer.
'
‘
.
ing integrally formedmetallic panels, each panel
having formed therein a plurality of upstanding
riblike members having fiat top walls lying in a
uniform horizontal plane and constituting slats
with intervening valleys, andstringers located
beneath the panels and extending transversely
with respect to the slats formed therein .for ele
vating the panels above the iloo'r level of the car
« or the like.
y
_ 2. A slatted floor for cars or the like, compris
The stringers 34 are of inverted channel for
mation comprising a top wall 42' and flanged
side walls 43, and since the stringers are held in
elevated relation by the feetA 39„.it will not or Í
lng integrally formed metallic panels, each panel
having formed therein a plurality of upstanding li()
riblike members having fiat top walls lying in a
dinarily be necessary to provide apertures in the
stringers for the circulation of air, although such
`apertures may be provided if desired. 'As shown
uniform horizontal plane and constituting slats
with intervening valleys, the slats being'provided
with downwardly flanged apertures to promote
45 in Fig. 6, the slatted section C comprises a plu- f the circulating of air therethrough, and stringers . ,
located beneath the panels and extending trans
rality of individual slats mounted upon tr'ans
versely extending stringers,y and the center sec
tion D is. secured to the end of the sec
_ tion C by hinges I4' to’enable the section D to
50 be swung inwardly against the section C~»when
'the latter is turned upwardlyupon its hinges 45.
Although in the form of construction shown
Vin Fig. 6 the slats extend lengthwise of the car.
-and the stringers extend transversely, it yis ob'
vious that a section of this construction might
be otherwise arranged to bring the slats into
I
transverse relation to the car body.
In> either form of construction, full provision
is made for the circulation of the air which flows
60 longitudinally of the car along the car ñoor and
up through the interstices afforded between the
slats, whether the latter be formed integrally or
individually. The slats andl stringers, being of
channel formation, afford great rigidity, and at
65 thev same time the method oi connecting the
parts by spot weldingl or the like prevents the
possibility of displacement orv distortion diue to
warping or rotting of the material. ~This also
versely with‘frespect to the slats formed therein
for elevatingr the panels above the floor level of
the ca'r or the like.
'
-
'
Iil. A slatted floor for cars or the like, compris
ing integrally formed metallic panels, each panel
having formed therein a plurality of upstanding
riblike members having ñat top walls lying in a
uniform horizontal' plane and constituting slats
with intervening valleysìthe slats being provided - l
with downwardly flanged apertures to promote
the circulation of air therethrough and the val
leys being provided with apertures for alike pur
pose, and stringers located beneath the panels and »
extending transversely with respect to the slats 60
therein formed for elevating the panel above the
floor level of the car or the like.
‘4. A slatted floor for cars or the like, cdnsisting
of separate sections, each section composed of a
plurality of. panels, each panel being- formed of
metal and configured to afford a plurality of par
allel upstanding ridges having flat top walls lying »
in a uniform horizontal plane and constituting
slats with intervening valleys, and a plurality of
prevents» the springing up of` individual slats due
70 to warping, with a resultant impairment in the - stringers Áextending beneath the panels composing
plane‘relation of the ñoor surface, which, when a section `and adapted'to hold the panels in ele
it occurs, interposes an impediment in the shift
vated relation above the level of the car floor.
ing of cargo, which often results in a tearing loose »
5. A' slatted door for cars or the like, consisting
of a slat or a splintcring of theÍ same where of separate sections. each section composed of a
wooden slats are employed.
`
'
plurality,- of panels, each panel> being formed of 75
,
_
.
,
-
aromas
metal and configured to afford a plurality of par
' i
3
the top walls all lying within the same horizontal '
allel upstanding ridges having flat top walls lying plane, and a mounting for the slat members po
in a uniform horizontal plane and constituting' sitioned to hold the slat members in elevated re
slats with intervening valleys, the slat surfaces lation to the i‘loor‘level of the car.
`
being apertured to facilitate the distribution of
8. A slatted floor for refrigerator cars, consist
air, and a >plurality of stringers extending be
ing of spaced parallel metallic slat members of
neath the panels composing a section and adapted >inverted channel formation each comprising a
to hold the panels in elevated relation above the horizontal top wall and depending vertical side
level of the car iloor.
6. A slatted floor for cars or the like. consisting'
, of separate sections,_ each section composed of a
plurality of panels, each panel being, formed of
Walls, the top walls all lying within the same hori
zontal plane and being provided with apertures to
promote the circulation of air, and a mounting for
the slat members positioned to hold the slat mem
metal and configured to afford a plurality of par-_
bers in elevated relation to the floor level of the
allel upstanding ridges having fiat top walls lying
in a uniform horizontal plane and constituting
slats with intervening valleys, the slat surfaces
being apertured to facilitate the distribution of
air and the valleys being apertured for a like pur
pose, and a plurality of strlngers extending be
neath the panels composing a section and adapted
to hold the panels in elevated relation above the
level of the car floor.
7. A slatted door for refrigerator cars. consist
ingr of spaced parallel metallic slat members of in
verted-channel formation each comprising a hori»
n zontal top`wall and depending vertical side walls,
car.
9. A slatted floor for refrigerator cars, _consist
ing of spaced parallel metallic slat members of
inverted channel formation each comprising a
horizontal top wall and depending vertical side
walls, the top walls all lying within the same
horizontal plane and being provided with down
wardly flanged apertures to promote the circula
tion of air, and a mounting for the slat members
positioned to hold the slatl members in elevated
lrelation to the floor level of the car.
GEORGE E. COFFEY.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
553 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа