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Патент USA US2108335

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Feb. 15, 1938.
‘A, E HEDGER
'
2,108335
RADIO TUNING CONTROL
Filed Oct. 21, ‘1956
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
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BY
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ATTORNEYS
‘Feb. 15?.1938.
‘
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A, E_ HEDGER
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2,108,335
RADIO TUNING CONTROL
.
Filed Oct. 21, 1936
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INVENTOR
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A‘IlTORNEYS
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Feb. 15, 1938.
4‘
A, E, HEDGER
’ 2,108,335
RADIO TUNING CONTROL
‘
Filed 0ot.v,2l, 1936
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Feb. 15, 1938.
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A_ E, HEDGER
2,108,335
RADIO TUNING CONTROL
Filed Oct. 21, 1956
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BY
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Patented Feb. 15, 1938
2,108,335.
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,108,335
RADIO TUNING CONTROL
Albert E. Hedger, Buffalo, N. Y.
Application October 21, 1936, Serial No‘. 106,841
14 Claims. (01. 2504.0)
This invention relates to a radio tuning con
ing condenser is commonly termed the “tuning”
trol for actuating the tuning condenser of a operation, and it is to this tuning operation that
radio receiving set.
the present invention is exclusively devoted;
The principal objects of the invention are:
This tuning‘ condenser 20 has the usual ?xed
5 A., to simplify the tuning operation by enabling
condenser plates 2| and movable plates 22 which
the operator to deal with only one wave band
at a time, and, B., to provide a machine in which
the “multiple” or “decimal” system is employed
so as to enable extreme accuracy of tuning to be
10 obtained, and 0., to enable the operator to manu
ally tune the radio set to the approximately cor
rect position and to then cause the. tuning to be
rendered precisely accurate by providing suit
able automatic means to obtain this result.
15 Numerous other objects of the invention and
practical solutions thereof are disclosed in de
tail in the herein patent speci?cation whereinzn
In the accompanying drawings:---
'
Fig. 1 is a fragmentary perspective showing
20 one form of radio receiving set provided with my
improved tuning control.
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary front elevation thereof.
Fig. 3 is a disassembled elevation of the four
strips of graduated indicators.
\
latter are all connected to a condenser shaft 23
which is journaled horizontally and transverse
ly of the radio cabinet 24 on bearing standards
25 and 26 suitably secured to the base 29. To
said condenser shaft 23 are secured primary and
secondary, condenser-actuating, gears 21 and
2161, While upon said condenser shaft are jour
naled tertiary and quaternary, condenser-actuat
ing gears 21b and 210.
The primary, condenser- actuating gear 21 is 15
small and is adapted to be actuated by a rack
28 having very sharp gear teeth as shown in
Fig. 4. This rack is actuated by alongitudinal
movement of a rack lever 30, to the rear end of
which it is integrally connected. The secondary,
condenser-actuating gear 21a is adapted to be
actuated by a secondary rack 28a which is se
cured to the rear end of a secondary rack lever
3M. It is to be noted that in the particular em
Fig. 4 is a vertical, longitudinal section through
the receiving set, taken on line 4—4, Fig. 2.
bodiment of the invention herein disclosed the
secondary, condenser-actuating gear 21a has a
Fig. 5 is avertical, longitudinal section through I diameter three times the diameter of the primary
the receiving set, similar to Fig. 4, but showing gear 21, and that, therefore, the secondary rack
the parts in a different operative position.
lever 30a must move longitudinally‘rearward‘ 7'
Fig. 6 is a horizontal section through the re
three times as far as the primary’ rack lever
ceiving set, taken on line 6--6, Fig. 4.
30 to obtain the same amount of rotation of the
Fig‘. 7 is a fragmentary, vertical, transverse condenser shaft 23. In other words, there is a
section through the receiving set, taken on line one to three ratio between the primary and sec
ondary rack levers 30 and 30a as regards the ef
1--'l, Fig. 6.
V
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary, vertical, transverse fect of their longitudinal movement on the rota 35
35
section through the receiving set, taken on line tion of the condenser shaft 23.
Between the secondary and tertiary rack levers
8—8, Fig. 6. .
,
Fig. 9 is a fragmentary, horizontal section 30a and 3% there is a ten to one ratio, and simi
through the receiving set, taken on line 9—-9, larly, there is a ten to one ratio between the
tertiary and quaternary rack levers 30b and
40 Fig. 8.
.
_
Fig. 10 is a fragmentary, vertical, transverse 300. This result is obtained by suitable gearing,
section, showing one of the locating plungers as shown in Figs. 6 and 4 and which is not
and its associated parts, and taken on line l0—-—l 0, deemed necessary to be described in detail.
Fig. 5.
While gears and racks have been illustrated
Similar characters of reference indicate like in the present disclosure to transmit power from 45
45
parts in the several ?gures of the drawings.
the rack levers to the condenser 20, it is to- be
25
When a radio receiving set is to be tuned so
understood that the power may be ‘transmitted
as to ‘properly receive the radio waves being
sent out from any certain radio sending sta
50 tion, it is necessary to turn the tuning condenser
28 (Fig. 6) to the proper position. In‘ the present
invention this condenser is preferably, though
not necessarily, of the “straight line” type, i. e.
the change in KC or MO is 'directly proportional
through frictional elements unprovided with
teeth but only with ‘,‘rolling circle” frictional
55 to its movement. The positioning of such a tun
faces.
.
-
50
Each of the four rack levers (for instance, the
rack ‘lever 300 shown in Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 8) is
fulcrumed on a horizontal, transverse, pivot pin
3|. The opposite ends of said pivot pin are pro
vided with spacing sleeves 32 so as to laterally 55
2,108,335
2
centralize their companion rack lever in its com
panion slide tube 33. Said slide tubes 33 are
suitably supported on the base 29 on standards
34 and 340. Each slide tube 33 is provided on
its opposite lateral sides with longitudinal guide
slots 35 which receive the outer ends of their
companion pivot pin 3|. Thus, each rack lever
may be moved lengthwise of its companion slide
tube 33 and rocked in any of its longitudinal
10 positions about its fulcrum pivot pin 3| and thus
be caused to move its companion rack upwardly
into engagement with its companion condenser
actuating gear.
'
ing station. If, for instance, the operator wishes
to tune in the American broadcast station corre~
sponding to 14:80 kc., he ?rst pushes the ?rst oper
ating knob 40 downward so as to engage the pri
mary rack 28 with the primary condenser-actuat
ing gear 21. He then moves said knob 40 rear
wardly until the numeral “1” of the primary,
American-broadcast, graduated indicator 54 ap
pears under the hair line 53 of the ?rst window 50,
as shown in Fig. 2.
This advances the tuning 10
condenser a certain amount.
He then suoces—
sively moves the three other operating knobs 40a,
40b, and 400 until the numerals 4, 8 and 0 appear
as shown.
Each of these operations advances the .
Pivoted at 36 to the front end of each rack
15 lever is a companion, vertical plunger 31. The
latter is vertically, slidably arranged in. a tubular
tuning condenser a further amount, the operator 15
allowing each operating knob to rise up, and to
slide head 38 which is longitudinally and slidably
arranged within the bore of its companion slide
tube 33. Each plunger 31 is normally maintained
20 in its uppermost position by the weight of its
ing knob.
companion rack which causes an upward thrust
at the front end of its companion rack lever, and,
consequently, of its companion plunger 31. The
upper end of each plunger is provided with a
25 suitable operating knob 4|], 40a, 40b and 400 so
as to permit its companion plunger to be pushed
down and then removed longitudinally. Each
plunger extends upwardly through a suitable
companion slot 4| formed in the radio cabinet 24,
30 the latter covering up all of the operating mecha
nism except the operating knobs and other simi
lar operating essentials.
Suitably secured to the rear end of each slide
head 38 is a flange 43, whose upper end is bent
35 horizontally rearward so as to enable it to be se
curely fastened to the lower, front end of a com
panion ?exible strip 44, 44a, 44b- and 440. Each
in this case was assumed to be stationv 1480 kc.
25
on the American-broadcast band.
It is to be noted that the ratio between the
movement of the ?rst operating knob 40 and the
corresponding movement of the tuning condenser
20 is relatively high. In other words, the ratio
of the primary condenser actuating means is
high and the condenser rotated a considerable
amount for a small movement of the primary op
erating knob 40. The ratios of the succeeding
condenser-actuating means are successively lower.
In the particular embodiment of the invention
here disclosed, the ratio between the primary and
secondary condenser-actuating means is three to
end between two sheets of felt or similar soft ma—
terial 45 and 46 so as to enable the strips to be
moved up and down the inclined guide 41 without
mension of a unit distance on the secondary,
inclined guide 41.
Each strip is partially exposed behind a rec
tangular window 50, 50a, 50b and 500 which
pierces the inclined front wall 5| of the cabinet
24 and in which is preferably set a small pane of
glass 52 inscribed with a straight, horizontal, hair
55 line 53, 53a, 53b and 530. Each of these strips
(see Fig. 3) is provided with four rows of gradu
ated indicators (54, 54a, 54b, 54c and 55, 55a, 55b,
55c and 56, 56a, 56b, 56c and 51, 51a, 51b, 510).
These graduated indicators bear numbers which
60 correspond to the wave length of the four follow
ing wave bands:
550
-1500 kc. (550-200 meters)
American
broadcast
1.50-
4.00 mc. (200-78 meters) Aircraft,
police signals, etc.
4.00-
10.00 mo.
(78-30 meters)
Foreign
broadcast
10.00-
23.00 mc. (30-13 meters) Short wave,
amateur phone, etc.
Each of these strips is adapted to be manually
moved lengthwise by its companion operating
knob until the companion hair line of its com
panion glass 52 registers with the speci?c number
75 desired when tuning in any particular radio send
20)
advance the tuning condenser 25 until it is ?nally
brought to a correct position for receiving radio
signals from the particular station desired which
one. concomitantly, the physical dimension of a
unit distance on the primary, American-broad
Thus, as any certain one of the slide heads 38 is
moved forwardly or rearwardly, its companion
flexible strip is caused to slide up or down in its
70
This successive movement of the dif
ferent operating knobs operates to successively
strip is constructed of “celluloid” or other trans
parent, ?exible material, and is guided at its rear
undue abrasion. A suitable curvilinear directing
plate 48 is preferably provided so as to cause said
45 strip to feed smoothly into said inclined guide 41.
65
thereby disengage its companion rack, before
commencing to manually actuate the next operat
cast, graduated indicator 54 of the ?rst ?exible
strip 44 is three times as great as the physical di
American-broadcast, graduated indicator 54a of
the secondstrip 44a.
This means that the cor-
responding gear ratios are such that the second
operating knob 40a must be moved three times as
far as the ?rst operating knob 40 to effect the
same movement of the tuning condenser 20.
Each of the succeeding operating knobs 40b
and 400 and their racks 28b and 28c must be 50
moved ten times as far as its predecessor to obtain
a like amount of condenser movement. This
means, of course, that the condenser can be very
accurately moved to any desired station in a man
ner similar to that employed in the construction ' r
of an ordinary shop micrometer in which a large.
coarse movement of the knurled operating sleeve
causes an extremely ?ne and accurate movement
of the sliding head of the micrometer.
It is to be noted that the numbers on the ?rst 60
strip 44 do not all go up to 9, this being due to
the idiosyncrasies of the various broadcast bands,
plus the fact that it is desirable to have the small
est unit dimensions suf?ciently large to be easily
located on their companion hair lines. In the
second strip 44a, however, all of the numbers go
up to 9, and hence this may be termed a strip
constructed on the decimal system. The numeral
10 has been omitted in each graduated indicator
because it might easily cause confusion and be 70
cause it is unnecessary, being the equivalent of 1
in the next graduated indicator of the same wave
band set of graduated indicators. Similarly, the
last two strips 44b and 440 are decimal strips and,
obviously, the ratios between the condenser-actu
75
3
2,108,335
ating means of the second and third and the third
and fourth strips are necessarily equal to ten.
Because of this fact the last three strips 44a, 44b
‘and Me are identical in appearance, although
‘different in function.
> f
'
cators may be used for all the four wave bands.
For instance, the graduated indicators 5%, 55b,
56c and 510 may be used, solely for all wave
bands, i. e., without any other graduated indi
cators, to take care of the other three wave bands,
V In an ordinary radio receiving set the “zero”
In such case, each of the strips 44, 44a, 44b and
position is at the 550 kc. American-broadcast
440 would contain only the one graduated indi
cator, and, if desired, these four strips may be
station, there being no need to move the condenser
to the zero kc. position. This is, of course, be
10 cause there are no stations which send out radio
waves of less than 550 kc. In the present system,
which is based upon a multiple or pseudo-decimal
system, it is desirable that the set be so arranged
that‘it can be indexed, theoretically at least to
receive waves of zero kc. This is because of the
inherent qualities of a “decimal” system of con
denser actuation. Hence, the c-ondenser of the
present invention may be said to be at its zero
position (similar to the zero of an ordinary radio
20 set) when the tuning control is set for 55!) kc. on
the American-broadcast band. From this it fol
lows that, when the tuning control disclosed in
the present invention is set at zero kc., the con
denser position is negative.
This characteristic
25 of the present invention is not advanced as a
point of superiority of the present invention, as
far as the operation thereof is concerned, but
merely as a fundamental feature which must be
‘incorporated in such a radio tuning control if the
30 tuning control is to be based on the multiple sys
tern‘ and be as simple and rational as that here
disclosed.
It is to be understood that the one condenser 20
is used for all four wave bands, although, of
35 course, for each wave band a different electrical
circuit is required. Consequently, the tuning of
the radio set for any of the other three wave
bands is similar to that just described, except
that di?erent graduated indicators are required
on the four strips for each of the other three wave
bands. For instance, if the operator desires to
tune the radio receiving set to station 3.125 me.
‘on the aircraft wave band he ?rst pushes down
the ?rst operating knob 40 and pushes the same
.rearwardly '(with said knob remaining depressed)
until the numeralB appears on the primary, air
craft-band, graduated'pindicator 55 of the ?rst
strip 44 under the hair line 53 of the ?rst window
50. He then releases said ?rst operating knob
50 40, thereby disengaging the primary rack 28 from
the primary, condenser-actuating gear 21. He
then seizes the second operating‘ knob 40a and
depresses it and pushes it rearwardly (with said
knob 40a remaining depressed) until the numeral
l appears on the secondary, aircraft-band, grad
uated indicator 55a of the second strip 44a under
the hair line 53a, of the second window 50a. He
constructed identically in form and size.
In such
case, of course, the gear ratios between each con 10
denser-actuating means would have a ten to one
ratio with its adjacent or neighbor condenser
actuating means. It is to be acknowledged that
such a re?nement of the invention is not easy of
accomplishment in that it requires much out 15
and try work and that it has not been effected in
actual practice, but is deemed, nevertheless, to be
a logical‘carrying out of the spirit of the present
invention.
'
To enable the present invention to be tuned 20
to any desired one of the four wave bands, it is
necessary to provide a suitable electric circuit for
eachiband, and to control the selectivity of the
circuits by a suitable wave switch which operates
in the usual and well known manner not deemed 25
necessary to be described here. This switch is
actuated by a suitable wave-switch handle 60.
The latter has four operative positions corre
sponding to the four wave bands, and is arranged
at the front end of a horizontal, longitudinal‘
wave-switch shaft 6! (see Fig. 4) which is suit
ably journaled at 62 in the base 29 of the radio
receiving set. Secured to an intermediate part of
said wave-switch shaft 6i is a pinion 53 which
meshes with a horizontal, transverse rack 64
(see Figs. 8 and 4) formed integrally in the lower
part of a vertical, transverse shutter plate 65.
The latter is slidably arranged on the base 29 in
suitable slides 66 so as to be able to move hori
zontally and transversely of said'base. Formed 40
in said shutter plate 65 is a rectangular, indicator
aperture 61 in which is ?tted a window spanned
by some such transparent material as “celluloid”
or “Cellophane” having four panes each of which
has a different color, for instance pane ‘i0 is white,
70a is green, liib is violet, and 100 is red. The
colors of these window panes correspond to the
colors of the four sets of graduated indicators of
the strips 44, 44a, 44b and Mic as indicated. The
one or other of these four colored panes is adapted 50
to be registered with the orifice ‘E5 of a wave
band, indicating lens II which is set into the in
clined front face 55 of the radio receiving cabinet
24 and’receives its illumination from a suitable
electric lamp bulb '12 secured to'a bracket 13 55
mounted on the base 29 of the set. Thus, as the
‘wave switch handle 60 is turned to any one of its
‘then releases said second operator knob 40a . four positions, an'appropriate color is emanated
and successively actuates the third and fourth
60 operating knobs ?ilb and 400 until the numerals
from the wave-band, indicating lens ll.
The operation of tuning in a station on the
Also formed in the shutter plate 65 is a hori 60
zontal row of four, narrow, rectangular slits ‘M,
‘Ma, 14b and ‘MC. The width of each of these
slits is the same as the width of each of the grad
uated indicators, and the location of each in the
65 foreign-broadcast band ‘(41.00-10.00 me.) or on
shutter plate is such that when any certain one 65
2 and 5 of the tertiary and quaternary, aircraft
band, indicator strips 552)‘ and 55c'appear under
the hair lines 53b and 530.
'
the short-wave band (10.00-23.00 me.) is similar
to the foregoing except that the digits on the
foreign broadcast and the short-wave, graduated
indicators are lined up with the hair lines of the
of ‘the colored panes ‘H1, ‘ma, 10b or 'Hic of the
shutter ‘aperture El’ is in register with the indi
cating lens ‘H, said rectangular slits are all in
register with the graduated indicators of one par_
ticular Wave band. For instance, in Fig. 8 the 70
windows 50, 50a, 50b and 500.
While the present invention has shown a differ
ent set of graduated indicators for each wave
band, it is to be understood that, if the condensers
white pane ‘iii of the rectangular aperture Bl’ is
in register with the orifice‘ ‘E5 of the lens ‘H, and
the slits’ ‘M, ‘Ma, ‘Mb and ‘Me are in register with
and the electrical units of the set are appropri
the American-broadcast, graduated indicators
75 ately designed, only one set of graduated. indi
54, 54a, 54b and 540. This arrangement acts not 75
2,108,335
4
only as a telltale to notify the operator as to just
what wave band is ready for tuning, but goes
further and actually prevents him from seeing
any other graduated indicators except those asso
ciated with the particular wave band he is dealing
with. This result is effected by reason of the fact
that the ?exible strips 44, 44a, 44b and 440 are
adapted to be illuminated through their com
panion windows 50, 50a, 50b and 500 from com
panion electric light bulbs 19, ‘19a, 19b and 190
(see Fig. 9), but the slits 14, ‘Ma, 14b and 140
only allow the light from these four bulbs to pass
through the graduated-indicators of one single
wave band set of graduated indicators at a time.
15 To carry out this scheme consistently, the differ
ent wave-band, graduated indicators of the flex
ible strips 44, 44a, 44b and 440 are differently
colored to correspond with the colored panes ‘i9,
“Illa, 10b‘ and 100 of the indicator aperture 61.
20 Thus, for any certain position of the wave switch
handle 60, the same color is emanated from the
indicator lens ‘H as appears in the windows 58,
50a, 50b and 5510. This renders the receiving set
more foolproof in operation because, after it has
25 been used for some time, the operator learns and
automatically associates a certain wave band
with a certain color which identi?es it.
It is highly desirable in an apparatus of this
character that each successive step of operations
be very accurately performed. It is also highly
desirable that no more dependence be placed
upon the operator than is absolutely essential.
In the present invention provision is made where
by the operator, in carrying out each operative
step, is merely required to effect each successive
tuning operation with a moderate degree of ac
curacy, the device itself causing the tuning to be
accurate within extremely small limits. This
result is obtained not only by the use of the
40
pseudo-decimal system previously described, but,
additionally, by a special form of the plungers 31.
The intermediate part of each plunger is provided
with a laterally extending lug (see Fig. 10) whose
upper edge is formed to provide a knife edge 16.
45 This knife edge is adapted to enter into one or
other of a plurality of locating notches 11 formed
in its companion slide tube 33, said notches being
formed in the one (left) face of the slot 18 which
extends along the upper longitudinal face of each
50 slide tube 33 to permit of the longitudinal move
ment of its companion plunger 31.
Thus, if the
operator fails to properly longitudinally position
any certain plunger 3'1, the upper knife edge 16
thereof will automatically shift said plunger and
55 its companion slide head 38 longitudinally a small
but sufficient amount to eifect an accurate posi
tioning of said slide head, and, consequently, of
the tuning condenser 20 to which it is operatively
connected.
It is to be understood that this cen
60 tralizing operation is completely effected by any
certain plunger 31 before its companion rack is
disengaged from its companion condenser-actu
ating gear 21, 21a, 211) or 210. ,It is also thought
to be obviousrthat a suitable spring may be em
ployed to push each plunger vertically upward if
the herein disclosed employment of unbalanced
gravitational forces proves too slow or otherwise
not entirely satisfactory.
It is desirable that no electric current be sent
70 to the loud speaker of the radio receiving set
while the tuning operation is in progress. T0 at
tain this result the present invention provides
a cutout switch 80 at the lower end of each plung
er 31. The four switches at the lower end of
76 the four plungers 31 are in series with each other
and are thus arranged in the electrical system in
such manner that, if any one switch is open,
no current will flow to the loud speaker. This re
sult is obtained in the usual and well known man
ner and is thought to warrant no further com
ment here.
It is also deemed desirable to have means pro
vided whereby, when the radio is being tuned,
only one rack at a time can be engaged with its
companion condenser-actuating gear, and, when 10
the radio is not being tuned, that none of
the racks can be engaged with their companion
condenser-actuating gears. This result is ob
tained by the use of a stop bar Bl which is dis
posed horizontally and transversely of the ma 15
chine and is transversely slidable in a pair of
brackets 82, 83 secured to the base 29. This stop
bar is provided on its lower face with a single
rectangular notch 84 which is adapted to either
register with any desired one of the rack levers 20
30, 30a, 30b and 300, or to be moved transversely
to the extreme limit of its motion to the right (as
in Fig. l) in which latter case said notch is out
of register with all of said rack levers.
The lateral shifting of said stop bar is effected 25
manually by a safety knob 85 which is prefer
ably pointed at its rear end, as shown, to en
able its position to be accurately gauged. Said
safety knob is secured to the upper end of a
safety post 86 which extends through a horizon 30
tal, transverse slot 81 formed in the cabinet 24 of
the radio receiving set to permit transverse move
ment of said safety post. The lower end of said
safety post 86 is secured to a horizontal, trans
verse slide rod 88 which is slidably mounted on 35
the base 29 in a slide tube 90 which is secured at
its opposite ends to the base 29 in brackets SI,
92, said slide tube 90 being slotted on its upper
face at 93 to permit the safety post 86 to move
horizontally and transversely of the radio set, 40
together with the slide rod 88 to which it is con
nected. The opposite ends of said slide rod 88
are bent horizontally rearward, as shown in Fig.
6, and are suitably secured at their rear ends to
the opposite ends of the stop bar 8i.
45
Said pointed safety knob 85 is in the same verL
tical, longitudinal plane as the notch 84 of the
stop bar 8! so that the operator can easily tell by
the position ofsaid knob what the position of said
notch is. This alignment operation is facilitated 50
by the position of the four horizontal, longitudi
nal slots 4| which pierce the radio cabinet to per
mit longitudinal movement of the plungers 31.
Operation
55
We will ?rst assume that the operator wishes
to tune in the radio receiving set to station 1480
kc. on the American-broadcast radio band. He
first turns the wave switch handle 60 until a
white light ?ashes through wave-band indicating 60
lens ‘II. This operation simultaneously brings
the four rectangular slits 14, 14a, 14b and 140 of
the shutter plate 65 into register with the Amer
ican-broadcast, graduated indicators 54, 54a, 54b
and 540, and thereby causes the latter to be il
luminated from their companion lights 19, 19a,
19b and 190 with a white color inasmuch as the
color of these particular graduated indicators is
white. All of the other graduated indicators are
at this time totally invisible because they are so
constructed as to only be visible when light is
passed through them but not when light is re
flected from their front surfaces.
The operator now moves the safety knob 85
laterally until it registers with the slot 4| of the
65
5
2,108,335
primary operating knob .40. This causes the
band, graduated indicator 55a; registers with the
notch .84 of the stop bar 8:] to register with the
primary rack lever 30 and permits the rear end
hair line 53am window 504;. He then, in a similar
manner, locates the numeral 2 of the tertiary, air~
craft-band, graduated indicator 55b under hair
line 53b, of window 50b and thereafter locates
of the latter to be elevated.
The operator now
grasps the primary operating knob 40 and pushes
it downwardly. This opens its companion cut
out switch 80 and thereby disconnects the loud
speaker while this particular tuning operation is
in progress. This movement also lifts the rear
10 end of the primary rack lever .30 so as to cause
the sharp pointed teeth of the rack, 28 thereof
15
afrom station 1480 kc. on the American-broadcast
band to station 3.125 me. on‘ the'aircraft—band,
he did not have to return the radio receiving setv
to its zero positionb'ut' merely shifted eachof V
the operating knobs in turn to its new position,
Thisoperation, incidently, he can effect by moving
rearwardly, until the numeral I of the primary,
said ‘operating knobs in any order he may ‘desire.
20 amount corresponding to themovement of said
primary operating'knob 4ll.v The operator ‘now
releases said primary operating knob 40, and
thereby allows its knife edge 16 to accurately
engage with the adjacent locating notch '11 of
25 its companion slide tube 33. Thiscauses the
tuning condenser to be very accurately located,
as far as this initial tuning step ‘is concerned,
even though the'operator does not move the‘pri
mary operating knob to precisely the position inf
v30 tended, said knife edge 16 causing‘a slight longi
tudinal shifting of its companion rack ‘lever in
the event that the latter has been longitudinally
positioned in an approximately correct but not
an exactly correctposition- ‘
'
'
The operator now shifts the safety knob 85 to
the right so as to position the same in register
with the secondaryoperating knob 40a. He then
pushes the latter down and moves it rearwardly
until the numeral 4 of the secondary, American
40 broadcast, graduated indicator 54a is in line with
,7 I claim as my i,nvention:—§
'
1. A radio tuning control associated with the
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators hav
ing their graduations of different length and nor
mally disconnected from the condenser; and a
pair of condenser actuating means of different
transmitting ratio, each of said means being
adapted to connect its companion indicator with 25
the condenser,
"
'
.
'2. A radio tuning control associated with the
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators having
their graduations of different length and normally 30
disconnected from the condenser; and a pair of
condenser actuating means 'of different trans
mitting ratio, each of said‘ means being adapted to
connect its companion indicator with the con
denser, the arrangement being such that when
the indicators are both set at zero the condense
is in a negative position.
"
3. A radio tuning control associated with the’
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators having
theirgraduations of different length and normally
the hair line 53a. This process is carried out in a
similar fashion so as to position the numerals 8
and 0 of the tertiary and quaternary, American
disconnected from the condenser; and a ‘pair ‘of
condenser actuating means of diiferent trans
broadcast, graduated indicators 54b and 540 under
mitting ratio, each of said means being adapted
45 the hair lines 5312 and. see; If the operator desires
that this tuning position be not accidentally’
to connect its‘ companion indicator with the con
denser, the arrangement being such that when
40
45
altered, he moves the safety knob 85 .to its ex
the indicators are both set at ‘zero the condenser
treme right position, as shown in Fig. 1, there,
is‘in a negative position and, when the indicators
are; set for the lowest station in any. certain wave
band, the condenser is in its zero position.
50
by preventing any manipulation of anyof the
operating knobs 46, 40a, ‘4021 or 400.
The operator now regulates the volume control '
switch 94 and the sensitivity switch. 95 in the
usual and well known manner.
'
.
‘
v_
‘ We ‘will now assume that the operator wishes to
.55
'
It is to be noted that when the operator shifted
tor now (with saidoperating' knob 40 still de
pressed) moves said primary operating knob
isters with the hairline 53 of window 150,, This
causes the tuningcondenser 20 to‘ be rotated an
3.5
graduated indicator 55c7und-er hair line 550 of
window 500.
to mesh with the sharp pointed teeth of the pri
mary condenser-actuating gear 21. The opera
American-broadcast, graduated indicator 54 reg
5
the numeral 5 of the quaternary, aircraft-band,
tune in station 3.125 me. on the aircraft-wave
band. He ?rst turns the wave-switch handle 60
until a green light ‘is seen through the wave
4‘. A radio tuning control associated with the
tuning condenser of a radio receivingset and
comprising; a pair of indicators normally discon
nected from the condenser, each indicator having
a plurality of graduations and the corresponding 55
graduations of the indicators relatively to each
other having the same ratio; and a pair yof con
denser actuating means of different ratio, each of
said means being adapted to connect its oom
panion indicator with the condenser.
60
are colored green to match the light coming
5. A radio tuning control associated with the
through the indicating lens ‘H. The rest of the tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
graduated indicators are at this time invisible.
comprising: a pair of indicators normally discon
The operator now moves the safety knob 85 over to nected from the condenser, each indicator having
a plurality of graduations and the corresponding 65
65 its extreme left position in line with the slot All of
the primary operating knob 49. He then push-es graduations of the indicators relatively to each
down the latter and moves it longitudinally until " other having the same ratio; a pair of condenser
the numeral 3 of the primary, aircraftéband, actuating means of different ratio, each of said
graduated indicator 55 is under the hair line 53 of means being adapted to connect its companion
indicator with the condenser; and means for il~ 70
70 the ?rst window 50. He then releases said pri
mary operating knob 40 and moves the safety luminating the one or other set of graduations
on the indicators.
knob 85 to the right into register with the slot 4|
of the secondary operating knob 40a. He then de;
6. A radio tuning control associated with the
presses the latter and moves it longitudinally tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of indicators normally dis 75
75 until the numeral 1 of the secondary, aircraft
band, indicating lens 7|. This operation simul
taneously illuminates all of the aircraft-band,
60. graduated indicators 55, 55a, 55b and 55c which
.
6
2,108,835
connected from the condenser, each indicator
having a plurality of graduations and the corre
sponding graduations of the indicators relatively
to each other having the same ratio; a pair of
condenser actuating means of different ratio,
each of said means being adapted to connect its
companion indicator with the condenser; and
means for illuminating the one or other set of
graduations on the indicators consisting of a
plate having a pair of apertures and adapted to’
be moved so as to have said apertures register
with the one or other set of graduations.
'7. A radio tuning control associated with the
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and com
25
of condenser actuating means of different trans
mittin-g ratio, each of said means being adapted
to connect its companion indicator with the con
denser; and means for shifting each condenser
actuating means to one or other exact location
when said actuating means is shifted to approxi
mately the correct position.
11. A radio tuning control associated With the
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators hav
ing their graduations of different length and
normally disconnected from the condenser; a pair
of condenser actuating means of di?erent trans
prising: a pair of indicators normally discon
nected from the condenser, each indicator having
a plurality of graduations and the correspond
ing graduations of the indicators ‘relatively to
to connect its companion indicator with the con
denser; a precision member having a plurality
each other having the same ratio; a pair of con
denser actuating means of different ratio, each
of said means being adapted to connect its com
plunger adapted to engage with the one or other
of V-shaped notches corresponding with the
graduations of said indicators; and a pointed
of said notches and to be longitudinally movably
switch; and means for co-relating the position
of said switch with one or other set of gradua
means.
tions on the indicators.
’
responding graduations of the indicators rela
tively to each other having the same ratio; a pair
of condenser actuating means of different ratio,
each of said means being adapted to connect its
companion indicator with the condenser; a wave
switch; and a wave light, the color of the illumié
15
mitting ratio, each of said means being adapted
panion indicator with the condenser; a wave
8. A radio tuning control associated with the
tuning con-denser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of indicators normally dis
connected from the condenser, each indicator
having a plurality of graduations and the cor
connected with one of said condenser actuating
12. A radio tuning control associated with the 25
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators hav
ing their graduations of di?erent length and
normally ‘disconnected from the condenser; a pair
of condenser actuating means of di?erent trans
30
mitting ratio, each of said means being adapted
to connect its companion indicator with the con
denser; and means'for preventing more than one
of said condenser actuating means being actu
35
ated at a time.
13. A radio tuning control associated with the
9. A radio tuning control associated with the
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of indicators normally dis
connected from the condenser, each indicator
having a plurality of graduations and the corre
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators hav
ing their graduations of di?erent length and
normally disconnected from the condenser; a 40
pair of condenser actuating means of diiTerent
transmitting ratio, each of said means being
adapted to connect its companion indicator with
the condenser; and means for preventing more
sponding graduations of the indicators relatively
than one of said condenser actuating means be
to each other having the same ratio; a pair of
condenser actuating means of different ratio,
each of said means being adapted to connect its
companion indicator with the condenser; a
ing actuated at a time and for preventing all
of said actuating means being actuated when the
nation from which is controlled by said wave
switch and is co-related with the sets of gradua
tions on the indicators.
45
ing their graduations of different length and
normally disconnected from the condenser; a pair
wave switch; a wave light; and means for illumi
nating the one or other set of graduations on the
indicators and simultaneously controlling the
color of the illumination emanating from said
wave light, consisting of a plate adapted to be
55 moved by said wave switch and having a pair
of apertures adapted to register with the one or
other set of graduations and having a pair of
colored members, the one or other of which is
adapted to register with the wave light.
10. A radio tuning control associated with the
60
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators hav
45
radio tuning operation has been completed.
14. A radio tuning control associated with the
tuning condenser of a radio receiving set and 50
comprising: a pair of graduated indicators hav
ing their graduations of different length and
normally disconnected from the condenser; a
pair of condenser actuating means of different
transmitting ratio, each of said means being 55
adapted to connect its companion indicator with
the condenser; and a cutout switch in series with
the electrical system of the radio set and adapt
ed to be opened whenever any one of the con
denser actuating means is being actuated.
ALBERT E. HEDGER.
60
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