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Патент USA US2108925

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Feb. 22,, 1938.
H. A. RAYNOR
2,198,925? I
KNITTED FABRIC AND THE'PRODUCTION THEREOF
Filed Feb. 14, 1936
3 Sheets-Sheet l
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JMEN roe
By W
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Feb. 22, 19330
H, A RAYNOR
2,108,925
KNITTED FABRIC AND THE PRODUCTION THEREOF
Filed Feb. 14, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Arraz/vss
Feb. 22, 1938.
x H, A, RAYNQR
2, 108,925
KNITTED FABRIC AND THE PRODUCTION THEREOF
Filed Feb. 14, 1936
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2,108,925
Patented Feb. 22, 1938
riser
2�8,925
KNITTED FABRIC AND THE rno'nno'rron
>
THEREOF
_
Harry Avery Raynor, Nottingham, England
Application February 14, 1936, Serial No. 63,925
In Great Britain February 15, 1935
13 Claims.
(Cl. 66-4190?)
This invention comprises improvements in .or of each bar extend between-the front and
rear stitch-loops of successively knitted stitch
knitted fabric and in the production thereof. The
type of fabric to which the invention refers is
that embodying one or more thread bars, other
5 than the stitch thread or threads, extending
weft-wise of the fabric, i. e. in the direction of
the stitch courses, and anchored in the fabric
by stitch loops.
Heretofore a knitted fabric of the above type
10 has been proposed embodying a transversely ex?
tending strand or plurality thereof locked in the
fabric by loops of the fabric extending through
the strand or each of same. In this proposed
fabric, however, the transversely extending strand
15 or each strand through which the fabric loops
pass is constituted by a single thread such as a
wrapped elastic thread individually introduced
and locked in the fabric, and in the production of
the fabric on a circular knitting
20 one strand is fed to the machine.
only
_
The invention is particularly applicable to elas
?tic knitted fabrics, i. e. fabrics including elastic 5
threads; and in this connection the aforesaid
compositeweft bar or each of selected of same
secured in the fabric may embody a, plurality
of'elasticstrands extending alongside each other
and suitably bound together, one or more of 10
said elastic strands being anchored by stitch
loops of one stitch course and another or others
by loops vofa succeeding course.
For the purpose of more fully describing the
nature of this invention reference will now be 15
made to the accompanying drawings, wherein:
Fig. 1 is a face view of a portion of rib knitted
fabric according tot-his invention.
-
2 is a section through the fabric.
Fig.3 is a face view of a modi?ed fabric.
A characteristic feature of the present in
vention consists in providing a fabric of the type
referred to wherein a weft-wise extending bar or
each of a plurality thereof embodies a plurality
25 of cores, pillars or strands extending alongside
each other and so connected as to be simulta
neously introduced into the fabric as a composite
bar or braid and anchored in the fabric by loops
which pass between said cores,'pillars or strands.
30 By providing a plural core or plural stranded
weft bar in lieu of a single strand weft, it will
be appreciated that the production of the fabric
is considerably facilitated, as any difficulty ex
perienced
courses.
.
causing a needle and stitch loop to
Fig. ll is a, section of the fabric shown in Fig. 3.?
Figs. 5 to 14 inclusive are detail views illus
trating successive steps
the production of the
fabric shown in Figs. land 2.
.
Hg. 15 is an elevational view of part of a, 25
circular knitting machine for producing the fab?
ric.
Fig. 16 is an enlarged detail view of part of
the machine shown in
15 but looking at same
30
?from the opposite side.
Fig. 17
a detail view showing one method?
of making a dual stranded weft for incorporat
ing in the knitted fabric.
By way of example, the invention will now be
described as? applied to a rib knitted fabric, e. g. 36
35 pierce a single strand, and particularly the en
circling covering of a single elastic or other 1a on-e-iand-one rib having incorporated therein
thread is eliminated, it being a matter of com ' weftwise extending elastic thread bars 1. Each
parative ease to pierce a composite weft bar or of the said weft thread bars 9 may
rubber ~strands or threads 2 each
braid between the cores or strands. Addition
ally, the passage of loops between the cores or ' one or more-layers 3 of cotton or
yarn
the wellknown manner,
strands of a composite weft provides a more se
cure and positive anchorage of the Weft in the
fabric.
-
Conveniently the weft-wise extending thread
45 bar or each of same in the fabric according to
this invention is constituted by a narrow braid
embodying a plurality (e. g. two) of longitudi
consist of two
wrapped with
other desired 40
and the two
wrapped ?rubber strands 2 being connected or
bound together alongside each other so as to
constitute a narrow braid, the covered elastic
strands constituting longitudinal pillars in said 45
braid. This braided weft l is so incorporated in
the rib fabric that one of ?the covered elastic
nally extending pillars, one or more of which is - strands or pillars 2 extends between and is
or are anchored in the fabric by stitch loops of gripped between the front stitch loops {1 and rear
one course of stitches and another or others by stitch loops 5 of one stitch course, while the other 50
stitch loops of the next succeeding course of covered elastic strand or pillar of the same braid
stitches, and certain of the loops pass through ~ ed weft extends between and is gripped between
the front and rear stitch loops 4 and 5 of the
the braid between said pillars.
Advantageously the fabric is a rib fabric, and next succeeding stitch course; the stitch loops
the strands or pillars of the composite weft bar at one side of the fabric,vthat is to say either 55
2,108,925
the front loops 4 or rear loops 5 passing through
the braided weft I between the said elastic
strands or pillars 2 so as positively to anchor the
weft from displacement in the fabric.
The above-described fabric can be produced on
any suitable type of rib knitting machine, and
by way of example the production will now be
described of a fabric according to Figs. 1 and 2
on a circular rib knitting machine, reference be
ing made to Figs. 5 to 14 of the drawings. For
convenience of description the operation of a
single cylinder needle 6 and its co-operating dial
needle ?I is referredto. Let it ?rst be assumed
that the cylinder needle 6 and the dial needle 1
15 have been retracted to the knock-over position
with the last made stitch loops 8 and 9 carried in
their hooks (Fig. 5) ; the cylinder needle 6 is now
projected to a tucking height with the stitch loop
8 over the latch, the dial needle ?I being retained
retracted (Fig. 6). The cylinder needle 6 dur
ing the lowering thereof is now brought round
into engagement with a toothed or tricked ro
tatably mounted wheel or disc II) which is formed
at its periphery with a horizontal channel I2
through which the dual stranded elastic braid I
is fed, said braid being fed horizontally beneath
the hook I I of the cylinder needle 6 in such a
manner that the tip_ or point of the hook is
caused during the continued downward move
ment or retraction of the needle to pierce the
braid between the two elastic strands or pillars
2 thereof (Fig. '7). As the braid I is drawn by
the needle hook II out of the channel I2 in the
member ID said braid is brought into a position
with the two strands 2 thereof located vertical
ly one above the other (Fig. 8), and the needle 6
then passes beneath the periphery of a horizontal
rotary disc or the like I3 which acts on the dual
stranded braid I to press one of the strands
thereof over to the back of the needle hook
and bring the pressed over strand of said braid
above the loop 8 (Fig. 9). The cylinder needle
6 and dial needle ?I are now simultaneously pro
jected to a thread feeding position, and in doing
45
so the stitch loop 8 on the cylinder needle to
gether with the dual stranded braid I is cleared
below the cylinder needle latch, and the stitch
loop 9 on the dial needle is also cleared behind
the dial needle latch, and a new thread I4 is fed
to both needles. The cylinder needle 6 is now re
50 tracted to the knock-over position and in so do
ing a loop I5 formed from the threadv I4 is
drawn through the old loop 8 and through the
braid I midway in its width between the elastic
strands 2, said braid I being thereby knocked
over with the old loop 8 (Fig. 11). Following
this the old loop 9 is knocked over from the
dial needle ?I and a new loop I6 is drawn thereby
from the thread M (Fig. 12). The two needles
6, 'l are now simultaneously projected to clear
.60 the
last formed loops ?I5 and I6 andvreceive
further thread I?! (Fig. 13), and said needles
are operated in the customary manner to form
further stitches from the last fed thread (Fig.
14).
By the above-described operation it will be
seen that one of the strands 2 of the dual
stranded braid I becomes embraced between
stitch loops produced on the cylinder and dial
needles, that is to say between the front and rear
stitch loops of the fabric, and the second strand
of the braid is so located as to become embraced
between the cylinder and dial stitches produced
at the next succeeding course, it being under
stood that at said second course the dual strand
ed braid is not fed to the needles. Thus it will be
appreciated that the two strands 2 of the braided
weft I are embraced in succeeding stitch courses,
the cylinder needle stitch loops being drawn
through the braid between the strands thereof
so as positively to lock the braid in position.
By feeding the dual strand braid at alternate
courses, that is to say by causing the needles to
pierce said braid at alternate courses, an elastic
strand is incorporated in each successive course 10
of stitches as before-described. If desired, how
ever, the stitch courses embodying the braided
Weft may alternate
weft. The weft I
threads may be fed
tension and means
with other courses devoid of
when incorporating elastic
to the needles under suitable 15
are provided for guiding the
weft to the needles so as to ensure said needles
piercing the weft between the elastic strands
thereof.
In Figs. 15 and 16 is illustrated a part of a cir
20
cular knitting machine showing more clearly
how the dual stranded braid is fed to the cyl
inder needles. The braid I is drawn from a suit
able rotatably mounted supply I8 and passed
through a guide I9 and between the circumfer 525
ential faces of a pair of truncated conical feeding
rollers 20 resiliently pressed together by a spring
2| or other suitable means. The speed at which
the braid I is fed to the machine can be adjusted
as required by moving said braid upwards or??'30
downwards between the rollers 20 so as to coact
with the varying diameters of said rollers, and this
may be accomplished by imparting rotation to a
screw-threaded rod 22 on which is mounted an
arm 23 retained from rotation and carrying the
guide I9, the rotation of the screw 22 traversing
said guide arm 23 up or down as required.
The
braid I after passing between the feed rollers 20
enters a ?at channel 24 of a ?xed guide member
25, which channel 24 brings the braid into posi-t .40
tion with the two strands 2 thereof horizontally
disposed, and from this channel 24 the braid is
guided into the horizontal channel I2 at the pe
riphery of the aforesaid rotatably mounted
toothed or tricked wheel I9, and the rotation of 45
said wheel may be e?ected by the needles coact
ing with the teeth or tricks thereof. This toothed
and channelled wheel IB serves to feed the dual
stranded braid I beneath the hooks of the de
scending needles and positively locate and hold?
said braid in the correct position for'ensuring
that the points of the needle hooks successively
pierce the braid midway in its width, i. e. be
tween the strands 2; said braid being held up
against the needle by which it is pierced. As
the needles leaves the teeth or tricks in the wheel
I {l the braid I assumes a position on the hooks
with the strands 2 thereof one over the other
one inside and the other outside the hooks. After
piercing the braid and while the cylinder needles
are retracted, the part of the dual stranded braid
outside the needle hooks is pushed over to the
back of the needles by passing beneath the hori
zontal disc I3, which disc also functions to bring
the strands 2 of the braid I side by side. From?
this position the machine operates in the man
ner previously described to draw thread loops
between the strands of the braid and fasten the
latter in the fabric.
The particular construction of the fabric em
bodying the plural stranded weft bars I may be
.varied without departing from the scope of the
present invention. For instance fancy effects
may be obtained by introducing at intervals dif
ferent types of stitches and/or different kinds of
60
65
70
75
3
2,108,925
stitch thread, and as an example a modi?ed form
of rib fabric is illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4 where
in, as compared with the fabric shown in Figs.
1 and 2, an additional thread course 26 is in
troduced at predetermined intervals and tuck
stitches 21 are formed in alternate needle wales
at said additional courses, said tuck stitches pref
erably occurring in the wales produced by the
dial needles ?I. If the additional course 26 with
10 tuck stitches 21 is knitted immediately after in
troducing and anchoring each plural stranded
weft bar I, and the tuck stitches are made in the
stitch wales appearing at the back of the fabric,
i. e. on the dial needles, the effect produced is to
15 shorten or tighten-up the cylinder needle stitches
which are drawn through the weft braid I at the
front of the fabric, thereby bunching-up the fab
ric over the anchored weft braids I and forming
outstanding ribs or lines running weft-wise of
20 the fabric as at 28 in Fig. 4. The thread intro
duced for making the additional stitch courses 26
with tuck stitches may be different from that
used in making the remainder of the fabric. For
example, the main fabric may be made of cotton
25 or wool and the additional courses 26 of arti?cial
silk thereby producing projecting lines of arti
?cial silk on the fabric face.
The braided weft I embodying the elastic
strands 2 may be produced on any suitable braid
30 ing machine. For example, a machine may be
employed wherein a plurality of spindles (e. g. six)
traverse an endless track of double-loop or ?gure
8 formation, a rubber strand being fed within each
loop of the track. In Fig. 1'7 is shown a small por
35 tion of dual stranded braid illustrating how same
may be constructed. The two strands 2 are each
spirally wrapped with cotton or like covering
threads 29, and the strands so wrapped are bound
together side by side by binding threads 30 which
40 pass alternately over one covered strand and be
neath the other strands in the manner of a
double-loop or ?gure 8, the said binding threads
intersecting each other between the two strands
so as to space or divide said strands suf?ciently
45 for enabling a needle to pierce the braid between
same. Where the covered or wrapped strands 2
are of rubber the spiral twist of the covering 29
of one strand is advantageously opposite to that
of the other strand, as shown at 30 in Fig. 17,
so that the ?nished braid is maintained ?at.
I claim:-?
7
1. A knitted fabric embodying at least one weft
other of said cores, pillars or bars by stitch loops
of the next succeeding course of stitches.
4. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 con
structed as a rib fabric and having the longi
tudinally extending cores, pillars or strands of the
composite weft bar held between the front and
rear stitch loops (oppositely drawn loops) of suc
cessively knitted stitch courses.
5. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 where
in the anchored composite weft bar embodies a 10
plurality of elastic cores, threads or pillars ex
tending alongside each other and bound together
by thread passing transversely to and fro from
one core to another.
6. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 con 15
structed as a rib fabric and embodying in pre
determined of the stitch courses tuck stitches
which draw up the fabric on one face thereof
to provide weft-wise extending ribs.
7. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 where 20
in predetermined of the stitch courses embody
tuck stitches at alternate stitch wales.
8. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 where
in predetermined of the stitch courses embody
thread different from that from which the re 25
mainder of the fabric is knitted.
9. A method of producing knitted fabric which
consists in introducing at predetermined times
a plurality of weft-wise extending strands or
threads, which are connected or bound together 30
alongside each other prior to introduction to the
fabric and simultaneously fed as a single com
posite weft bar, and anchoring said bar by pass
ing predetermined of the stitch loops of the fab
ric through the bar between the strands so that 35
at least one of said strands is gripped or held
by stitch loops of one knitted course and the re
maining strand or threads by stitch loops of the
next succeeding course.
10. A rib knitted fabric embodying at least one 40
straight weft bar, which bar embodies at least
two elastic cores bound together to extend lon
gitudinally side by side and constituting a com
posite weft bar, and is anchored in the fabric
by stitch loops which pass through the division 45
between said elastic cores, wherein at least one
core of said composite bar is gripped between
oppositely drawn stitch loops of one course of
stitches while the remainder is gripped between
oppositely drawn loops of the next succeeding 50
stitch course.
11?. A rib fabric according to the last preced
bar, other than the stitch thread or threads, ' ing claim wherein outstanding ribs are formed
anchored in the fabric by stitch loops thereof,
55 which weft bar embodies a plurality of cores,
pillars or strands extending longitudinally side
by side and connected thereto, so as to be capable
of simultaneous introduction into the fabric as a
weftwise at intervals by tightening or drawing
up the stitch loops which pass through and 55
anchor the composite weft bars.
12. A fabric according to- claim 1 wherein the
composite weft bar comprises two elastic cores
composite bar or braid, and is anchored in the
fabric by thread loops that pass between the said
cores, pillars or strands.
2. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 where
in at least one of the cores, pillars or strands of
the composite weft bar is gripped or held by
stitch loops appertaining to one course of stitches
and the remaining core, pillar or strand is gripped
or held by stitch loops appertaining to a subse
individually covered by spiral wrappings, where
quently knitted course of stitches. '
binding them together, in which fabric certain
stitch loops trans?x the weft bar and extend
3. A knitted fabric according to claim 1 where
70 in at least one of the cores, pillars or strands of
the composite weft bar is anchored in the fabric
by stitch loops of one course of stitches and an
of the wrapping of one core is in an opposite
direction to the wrapping of the other core, and.
the said wrapped cores are connected together
side by side by an additional wrapping the thread
or threads of which intersect between the cores.
13. A knitted fabric embodying in addition to 65
the stitch loops constituting it, a weft bar com
prising a plurality of cores and binding thread
between the cores thereof.
HARRY AVERY RAYNOR.
70
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