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Патент USA US2109225

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Feb. 22, 1938.
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D, ULREY
2,109,225
MEANS FOR AGING VACUUM TUBES
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Filed NOV. 28, 1,956
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WITNESSES;
INVENTOR
Dayfon U/rey
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BY
ATTORN Y
_. 2,109,225
Patented Feb. 22, 1938
UNITED sTATEs PATENT-_ OFFICE
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"2,109,225
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MEANS FOR AGING VACUUM TUBES
Dayton Ulrey, Forest Hills, Pa., assignor to West
,
inghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company,
East Pittsburgh, Pa., a. corporation of Penn
sylvania
Application November 28, 1936, Serial No. 113,159
6 Claims. (01. 250-275)
My invention relates to vacuum tubes, and es
pecially to a method of aging vacuum tubes.
An object of my invention is to provide means
for aging vacuum tubes so that they will not
6 spark over at voltages that they would otherwise
withstand.
Other objects and advantages of my invention
will be apparent from the accompanying descrip
. tion and drawing, in which the ?gure is a dia
10 grammatic circuit showing a preferred embodi
ment of my invention.
In vacuum tubes using very high voltages, con
siderable trouble is caused by ?ashovers that in
terrupt the performance of the tube. The tubes
l
high resistance 2| is also inserted in the charging
circuit.
In operation of the device, the power source 19
operating through the recti?er 20 charges the
plates l6 and I‘! to a high voltage. The voltage is
increased until the tube flashover, thus discharg- '
ing the condenser. The condenser then charges
again and the process is repeated inde?nitely.
The Voltage on the condenser increases as the
tube improves and incidentally the number of 10
the flashovers of the tube during a given period
represent a measure of the quality of the tube as
regards withstanding voltage. By means of my
invention, tubes which would break down at volt
in which the trouble occurred were of the cop
ages as low as 20,000 to 30,000 volts can now be 15
per exterior anode and interior directly heated,
cathode that were normally designed to with
stand very‘high voltages. It was found that
aged up to withstand as high as 50,000 volts and
higher. These tubes are used extensively in
these tubes with the cathode unheated would
20 break down at voltages around 20,000 to 30,000,
although designed for a much higher peak volt
age.
I believe that one of the causes of these
?ashovers is probably caused. by some occluded
gas that had been released after the tube had
25 been sealed off.
I have discovered that the tube can be aged
against ?ashovers at these voltages by providing
instantaneous or temporary discharges of hun
dreds of amperes. I believe a discharge at a high
30 amperage across the condenser probably cleans
up this residual occluded gas that apparently
causes the di?iculty with these high powered
tubes.
According to my invention, I have provided a
35 means for discharging hundreds of amperes
through a tube and then raise the voltage of this
high instantaneous current still higher until
another flashover occurs, and then I repeat the
process until the tube can withstand the desired
40 voltage without ?ashover.
‘
In the drawing, [0 represents the tube to be
aged, having the usual cathode II and anode l2
which, of course, in these'high voltage tubes is
a copper exterior water cooled anode.
The tube
45 may also contain one or more auxiliary electrodes
such as the grid l3. For the purpose of my in
vention, I connect the grid and cathode together
as shown at M.
Across the anode and cathode
grid is connected the high voltage condenser I5
50 with its plates l6 and II. A high voltage volt
meter IB may also be connected across the elec
trodes. Power is supplied from 7 any suitable
source l9 which may, of course, include the trans
former and a rectifier 20 to provide the uni-direc
A
55 tional current if alternating current is used.
broadcasting service, and my invention provides
means for minimizing the interruption to the
broadcasting service heretofore caused by tubes 20
.?ashing over at less than their peak rating of
voltage.
The voltage to which ‘the condenser is to be
charged will determine the rating of the trans
former IS. The rating of the condenser l5 de 25
pends on how rapidly it is desired to haveit
charged. In general, I prefer to use from one
tenth to one-half microfarad capacity condenser.
While I have disclosed a preferred embodiment
of my invention, yet modi?cations thereof are 30
possible within the scope of my invention. I ac
cordingly, therefore, desire only such limitations
on the following claims as is necessitated by the
prior art.
I claim as my invention:
,
.
'
35
1. The method of aging vacuum tubes which
comprises establishing a vacuum therein and
causing a series of ?ashovers between electrodes
in the vacuum without heating current applied to .
40V
the cathode.
2. The method of aging vacuum tubes which
comprises causing a series of flashovers between
electrodes without heating current applied to the
cathode and increasing the voltage of the suc
ceeding ?ashovers.
45
3. The method of aging vacuum tubes which
comprises connecting a condenser to the elec
trodes thereof while the heating current for the
cathode is disconnected, charging the condenser,
permitting the condenser to discharge across the
electrodes and recharging the condenser and per—
mitting it to discharge across the electrodes.
e. The method of aging vacuum tubes which
comprises connecting a condenser to the elec
trodes thereof while the heating current for the
50C,
2
2,109,225
cathode is disconnected, charging the condenser,
permitting the condenser to discharge across the
ing the condenser and discharging the condenser
through the tube.
electrodes and recharging the condenser to a
higher voltage and permitting it to discharge
6. The method of aging vacuum tubes which 7
comprises connecting ‘a condenser across the
across the electrodes.
'
5. The method of aging vacuum tubes which
comprises connecting a condenser across the
electrodes without connecting the heating cur
rent to the cathode, charging the condenser to
the order of tens of thousands of volts, discharg
ing the condenser through the tube and recharg
electrodes without connecting the heating cur
rent to the vcathode, charging the condenser to
the order of tens of thousands of volts, discharg-v
ing the condenser through the tube and recharg
ing the condenser to a higher voltage and dis
charging the condenser through the tube.
"
DAYTON ULREY.
10
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