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Патент USA US2110008

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March 1, 1938.
G. w. WARDWE|_1_,JR
y
2,110,008 n
IRONING MACHINE
Filed Sept. 20, 1934
pigi
‘y
Inventor :
George \/\/. Wardwel I.,JT“,
Att orneg.
Patented Mar. i9 l ` ` "
_
George
anatra
inoltrare Mannino
. warmen, n., Nichols, com., assigner
to General Electric Company, a corporation of
New lli'orlr
application September 20, 1934i, Serial No. ‘léiéißl93
i3 (Claims. (Cl. Sid-3d)
ll/liy invention relates to ironing machines of the The front and rear sides and edges of the shell
type in which ironing is eiîected by the pressure are connected by spaced transverse vertical ribs
between avheated shoe and a buck.
it having integral ears lia spot welded to the
The object of my invention is to provide an im» shell at the edges and the bottom. The lower
5 proved construction and arrangement in an iro-n
ing machine of this type, and for a consideration
of what ll believe to be novel and my invention,
attention is directed to the accompanying spec
iiication and the claims appended thereto.
In the accompanying drawing, Fig. l is a sec
tional end elevation of an ironing machine em
bodying my invention; Fig. 2 is a plan View partly
edges of the ribs it are spaced from the bottom
of the buck to provide a space for drainage of
condensed moisture along the bottom of the wall
of the buck toward the center. At either end of
the buck, a rib läb having its upper edge in line
with the upper edge of the ribs i3 is fixed to the
edge of the shell. The rib lill? forms an end sup
port for a Wire mesh screen lil placed across the
broken away of the buck; Fig. 3 is a sectional
view taken on line 3_3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4i is a
upper edges of the ribs i3 and lith.
fragmentary plan view partly broken away of the
front end of the carriage; Fig. 5 is an exploded
View of part of the mechanism for moving the
the mesh of the screen so that the ribs do not
The spac
ing of the ribs'ld is relatively great compared to
interfere with the passage of steam through
Fig. 6 is an end elevation of the drain pan and
the screen. The screen Ml provides a support
for a pad l5 and a pad cover ita of textile ma
terial. The pad is held in place over the upper
the support therefor; Fig. '7 is a sectional view
surface of the buck by cords ltì which are con
taken on line 'i-'l of Fig. l, and Fig. 8 is an en
nected to the pad cover and are laced across the
under side of the buck. The screen i/i and the
shoe into pressing engagement with the buck;
larged fragmentary view :of the pressure mech
anism as shown in Fig. 1.
The ironing machine is carried on a hollow
base or support l. The iront end of the upper
wall of the base is provided with a depression 2
which provides a tray for pins and the like. The
rear upper wall of the base is turned up at "d to
provide an apron which will prevent the surplus
30 of the material being ironed from falling over
the rear edge of the base. The upper. side of the
base is provided with a rectangular depression il.
In this depression is placed the lower end of a
hollow rectangular member t made of rubber or
other resilient material for resiliently supporting
a hollow buck li. The upper end of the member il
fits within the depending sides of a rectangular
cup-'l which is attached to the lower side of the
buclr'at the center. The rectangular shape oi
the member t prevents turning of the buck.. A
bolt il having a head iitting withina tapered
openingßa in the lower wall of the buck ex
tends through an opening il in the upper wall ofl
the base,- secures the buck to the base, and holds
45 the upper and lower ends of the member 5 in
firm. contact with the rectangular cap 'l and the
depression il in the base. The opening d is larger
than the bolt and allows some lateral movement
oi“ the bolt. A rubber washer l@ placed between
a nut li on the bolt and the upper side of the
base resiliently holds the bolt in position in the
base. With this arrangement the buck is resil
iently supported so that it can tilt in all direc
„ tions in order to maintain an even pressure over
the surface ofgtherbuck during ironing.
The buck .l5 is hollow and is fabricated from a>
metal shell having sides t2 which flare outwardly
and upwardly ,from the cup l to provide the
bottom wall of the buck,`and are turned up
60 wardly at tta to provide the edges of the buck.
20
supporting ribs. it provide a construction which
adequately supports the pad la and provides a
large area for the steam which is generated dur
ing ironing to pass through the pad into the in
terior of metal shell l2 where it is condensed.
By placing the pad directly on the screen, the full
area of the screen is available for the passage oi’ v
steam into the buck. The space between the
lower ends of the ribs i3 and the bottom of
the buck permits the steam to flow along the
buck beneath the ribs. This makes the whole
bottom wall of the buck available for condens
ing moisture even though only part oí‘ the buck is
being used. When the steam is condensed, it
Iiows along the bottom wall of the buck toward
the center and is led through openings Illia in the
bottom wall of the buck and the cap il to the
interior of the rubber member 5. From there; 40
the moisture is led through the base by a drain
tube l'l to an opening ita in the upper wall of a
pan it carried within the base. The pan ld is
tubular and closed on all sides except for the
opening ita. The pan is supported by lugs [Ito
secured to the ends of the pan which rest in re-cesses in brackets itc supported from the side
wall of the base. A spring clip ltd carried by
the side wall of the base presses down on the
top of the pan so- that the lugs lab are held
ñrmly in contact with the brackets itc. The
pan may be removed by lifting the rear end of
the pan until the lug l‘êlb is clear of the recess
in the bracket lßc and sliding the pan to one
side until clear of the spring clip ldd. The lo
cation of the hole in the pan is such that the
condensed moisture will not be spilled if the ma
chine is tipped when moving from one location
to another. By withdrawing the steam generated
during ironing, the pad is kept dry and the iron
2
2,110,008
ing speed is increased.
The rubber member
5 and the rubber washer |0 provide seals which
prevent the leakage of the condensed moisture
over the outside of the base and into the -in
terior of the base.
'I'he buck is supported on the base so that the
upper surface of the buck is inclined upwardly
from the front. The inclined surface of the buck
makes the adjustment of the clothes over the
surface of the buck easier. I consider this an
important feature of my invention.
'I'he carriage for supporting the shoe comprises
a channel -I9 of U-shaped configuration having a
reenforcing web |90. secured between the flanges.
15 The lower arm 20 of the carriage is pivotally
carried on the base between guides 20a, by a pin
2| which fits within an elongated slot 22 formed
in each flange of the channel. The pin 2| is
below and to the rear of the center line of the
20 buck. By providing a carriage pivoted below the
inclined buck, a shorter travel of the carriage is
needed to move the shoe carried by the carriage
into and out of register with the buck. By piv
oting the carriage below and to the rear of the
25 center line of the inclined buck, the clearance
of the shoe may be decreased without disarrang
ing the material on the buck because the shoe
tends to swing down on the buck as the shoe is
moved from the out-of-register to the in-register
30 positions. This construction has the further ad
vantage that when the shoe is moved to the out
of-register position, the shoe has less tendency
to throw heat into the operator’s face. The slots
' 22 are inclined toward the lower arm so that
35 the pin 2| tends to -remain at the front end of
the slots 22 when the carriage is pivoted forward
from the position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 1,
to the position shown in full lines in Fig. l. A
notch 23 is formed in the front end of the lower
40 arm 20 of the carriage. The upper side 23a of
the notch 23 projects beyond the lower side 23h
of the notch so that when the carriage is pivoted
forward, the lower side 23b swings past a pin
24 in the base and the upper side 23a engages
45 the pin 24, stopping the pivotal movement of
the carriage. From this position, the carriage is
moved to the position shown in full lines in Fig.
1 by sliding the carriage forward so that the
notch 23 engages the pin 24 and locks the car
50 riage in this position. When the carriage is in
this position, it cannot be displaced by forces
on the upper arm of the carriage, perpendicular
to the upper surface of the buck. To move the
carriage from the position shown in full lines
55 to the msition shown in dotted lines, the car
riage is first pushed rearward so that the notch
23 is moved clear of the pin 24 and the pin 2i
is at the front of slot 22 and the carriage is
then pivoted rearward on the pin 2E.
60
A shoe 25 which is preferably made of alumi
num or other suitable metal is supported on the
lower side of the upper arm 26 of the carriage
by two pins 21.
The lower ends of these pins
are threaded into the upper surface of the shoe
65 at points intermediate the ends of the shoe on
either side of the center of the shoe. The body
of each of the pins passes through a bushing 28
which is secured at the lower end to a cross
member 29 connected between the ñanges of the
70 upper arm of the carriage. A coil spring 33
surrounding the bushing and the pin and ar
ranged between the cross member '29 and a
washer 3| secured to the upper end of the pin
biases the shoe upward against the lower side
of the upper arm 26 of the carriage. The springs
30 permit the shoe to be moved away from the
carriage, and the bushings 28 guide the move
ment of the shoe and permit a limited tilting
movement of the shoe.
The shoe is heated by a heating element 32 im
which is clamped in a groove formed in the
upper surface of the shoe by clamps 33. A switch
32a controls the iiow of current to the heating
elements. A cover 34 is provided to enclose the
upper surface of the shoe.
When the'carriage is in the position shown in
full lines in Fig. 1, the carriage is held against
vertical movement by the pins 2| and 24, and
the shoe 25 is in register with and in spaced
relation to the buck.
To move the shoe into
pressing engagement with the buck, a low-pres
sure mechanism is provided which moves the shoe
relative to the carriage into contact with the
buck, and a heavy-pressure mechanism is pro
vided which subsequently moves the shoe into
final pressing engagement with the buck.
The low-pressure mechanism comprises a hol
low shaft 35 which is pivotally carried on the
carriage by a bushing 36 secured to the under
side of the web of the upper arm 26 of the car
riage. Pins 31 are secured at one end to the shaft,
and the projecting ends of the pins 31 iit within
rounded recesses 38 in a sliding block or support
39.
The recesses 38 prevent endwise displace
ment of the shaft 35. The block 39 slides in a
guide 40 secured between the flanges of the upper
arm of the carriage.
An ear 40a on the upper
edge of the guide 40 limits the upward movement
of the block. An operating lever 4| is connected
to the projecting end of the shaft 35 for rotat
ing the shaft. Rotation of the lever 4| in a
counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. l,
causes the pins 31 to force the block 39 down
ward against a plate 51 secured to the upper
surface of the shoe to force the shoe away from
the carriage and into engagement with the buck.
A stop 39a secured to the top of the block 39
engages the arm of the carriage and limits the
downward movement of the block. The leverage
exerted by the lever 4| is such that only a low
pressure is required to move the shoe against
the action of springs 3U so that the shoe may
be moved quickly and easily into contact with
the buck. The position to which the shoe and
block 39 are moved by the lever 4| depends on 50
the thickness of the materia-l placed on the buck.
This compensates for variations in thickness of
the materials being ironed. When the lever 4|
is released, the springs 30 return the shoe, the
block, and the operating lever 4| to the position 55
shown in full lines in Fig. l.
The shoe is moved into final pressing engage
ment with the buck by a heavy-pressure mech
anism which has a shaft 42 journaled in bush
ings 43 in the block 39. The bushings are lubri 60
cated by wicks 43a. A cam 44 is secured to the
shaft 42 by a pin 46 and fits within a recess 45
in the block 39 between the bushings 43. A slot
45a is formed in the bottom and rear si'de walls
of the block through which the cam projects. 65
The edges of the slot 45a prevent longitudinal
displacement of the cam and the shaft 42. The
working surface of the cam is provided by a
roll 41 which is journaled between flanges 48
of the cam. The roll 41 engages the plate _51 70
secured to the upper surface of the shoe.
when the block 39 is in the position iuustrated
in Fig. l, it is free to slide up and down in the
guide 40 relative to the upper arm of the car
riage. In order to lock the block 39 to the up
aimons
per arm of the carriage so that the cam 44 may
exert a pressure tending to move the shoe away
less tendency to throw heat in the operator’s
face when in the dotted line position. To iron
the material placed on the buck, the operator
pivots the carriage about pin 2l by pulling on
from the carriage, a U-shaped pawl-49 is pro
vided which is carried within the recess 95 in
the block 39. The front and rear sides of the
pawl are on either side of the shaft 42, and the
bottom of the pawl rests on ledges 45h at the
bottom of_ the block 39. The pawl therefore
lever 91 and as the carriage approaches the po
sition shown in full lines in Fig. 1, the lower
edge 23h of the arm of the carriage swings past
pin 23, and the upper edge 23a of the lower
pivots on shaft 42. A slot 49a is formed in the
bottom of the pawl within which the cam 44
may‘rotate without disturbing the pawl. The
pawl has a pointed upper front edge 5U which
arm engages the pin 2t, thus stopping further
turning movement of the carriage. The opera 10
tor then pulls on lever di to slide the carriage
forward to bring notch 23 over pin 24, the elon
gated slots 22 permitting the carriage to be pulled
forwardly on the pin 2i. This locks the car
riage in the position shown in Fig. 1. The op 15
erator now rotates the lever 4i in a counterclock
Wise direction, as viewed in Fig. l, to cause the
pins 3l to force the block 39 downwardly against
the plate 5l on the upper surface of the shoe
and move the shoe into contact with the mate 20
rial placed on the buck. The movement of the
shoe and the block 39 depends on the thickness
of the material on the buck. To complete the
is adapted to engage one of a series of notches
5l in a. plate 52 secured to the front wall of
the guide 4U under the ear 40a. When the pawl
engages a notch 5l, the bottom of the pawl which
rests on the ledges 45h prevents upward move
ment-ofthe block 39 and locks the block to the
carriage. A spring 53 arranged in a recess 53a
in the front of the block 39 urges the front edge
of the pawl toward the notches in plate 52. A
shoulder 54 formed on the cam engages the rear
edge 55 of the pawl when the parts are in the
position shown in Fig. 1 and holds the pawl out
25 of engagement with the notches 5l against the
force of spring 53. The force exerted by the
springs 30 tends to maintain the cam 44 in the
position to hold the pawl out of engagement with
the notches 5l. An operating handle 56 is con
'30 nected to the projecting end of the shaft 42
for rotating the cam. 'I‘he operating levers 4l
ironing operation, the operator rotates the lever
55 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in 25
Fig. 1, while still holding the lever 4i in the
lowered position. Since both hands are required
to operate the machine, the safety of the ma
chine is increased. The initial movement of the
lever 55 moves the shoulder 5d on the cam away 30
from the rear edge 55 of the pawl and permits
the spring 53 to move the front edge 50 of the
pawl into engagement with one of the notches
5l in the plate 52. This locks the block 39 to
the carriage in the position to which it was 35
and 56 are arranged on opposite sides of the up
per arm of the carriage so that both levers can
not be operated with one hand. This increases
the safety of the machine. A cover 5l secured
to the upper arm of the carriage encloses the
moved by the lever 4l. Continued rotationof _the
pressure-developing mechanism.
lever 55 causes the roller 4l of the cam to force
When the handle 56 is moved in a counterclock
wise direction, as viewed in Fig. l, the initial
40 movement of the handle moves the shoulder
the shoe into iinal pressing engagement with the
buck. To release the shoe, the operator ilrst
returns the lever 56 to the position shown in 40
Fig. 1. The final return movement of the lever
54 on the cam away from the rear edge 55 of
the pawl and allows the spring 53 to move the
56 causes the shoulder 54 of the cam to engage
the rear edge 55 of the pawl to force the pawl
out of engagement with the engaged notch of
the plate 52. 'I'he operator holds lever 4| until
the lever 56 is returned to the released position
and then lets lever 4l return slowly under the
edge 50.0f the pawl into engagement with one
oi' the notches 5I in the plate 52. This locks
45 the block 39 in the position to which it has been
moved by the lever 4I. Continued rotation of
the lever 56 in a counterclockwise direction turns
cam 44 and causes the roller 41 to move the shoe
action of springs 39. This prevents a sudden re
turn of the shoe and lever 4l. To uncover the
relative to the carriage into final pressing engage
ment with the buck. The roller 41 of the cam
is moved past the center of the shaft 42 so that
surface of the buck so that the ironed material 50
may be removed, the operator pushes on the
lever 4l. The initial eiîect of .pushing on the
lever 4l is to slide the carriage rearwardly so
that the notch 23 is clear of the pin 24 and the
pin 2l is in the front part of the slots 22. Con 55
the cam will remain in this position. 'I'he rear
edge 44a of the cam engages the block 39 above
the slot 45a and limits the rotation of the cam.
55 Since the low-pressure mechanism moves the
shoe into contact with the buck and moves the
block 39 to a corresponding position, the cam of
tinued rearward pressure on the lever 4I causes
the carriage to'pivot about the pin 2| and to
return to the position shown in dotted lines in
Fig. 1.
, the heavy-pressure mechanism needs only a small
throw, so that the force of reaction of the lever
00 56 when released by the operator is small. The
'
The pressure-developing mechanism, the re
block 39 is locked to the carriage by the pawl
49 until the operating lever 56 is returned to
the position shown in Fig.« 1, at which position
silient mounting for the buck, and the drain pan
the shoulder 54 engages the rear edge 55 of the
65 pawl and moves the front edge 50 of the pawl
cation Serial No. 745,428, ñled September 25, 1934.
out of engagement with the notches in the
plate 52.
I
In the operation of the ironing machine, as
sume that the carriage is in the position shown
70 in dotted lines in Fig. 1; In this position the
shoe is out of register with the buck so that
the operator may arrange the material to be
form no part of my invention, but are the inven
tion of J. S. Visscher and are claimed in appli
What I claim as new and desire to secure by 65
Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. An ironing press comprising a support, a
buck carried by the support, a shoe, a carriage
for said shoe, said carriage being pivoted on said
support for movement of said shoe from a position 70
Since
out of register with said buck to a position in
register with said buck, means including a sliding
connection between the carriage and the support
the shoe is arranged to cooperate with ‘a buck
inclined upwardly from the front, the shoe has
for locking the carriage in said last-named posi
tion upon sliding movement of the carriage on
ironed on the upper surface of the buck.
4
2,1 10,008
the support, and means for effecting movement
of said buck and said shoe relative to each other
into pressing engagement.
2. An ironing press comprising a support, a
El
buck carried by said support, a carriage pivoted
on said support and slidable forward on said
pivot, a shoe carried by said carriage and mov
able thereby to a position in register with said
buck, means rendered effective on forward sliding
of said carriage on said pivot for locking said car
riage in this position, and means for relatively
moving said buck and said shoe into pressing
engagement, ,
3. An ironing press comprising a support, a
buck carried by said support, a carriage having
throughout substantially its entire surface where
by the steam generated during ironing flows di
rectly through the pad and through the mesh of
the screen, and means enclosing the under side
of the screen and spaced therefrom for protect
ing the screen from the atmosphere.
Ul
'
9. An ironing press comprising a support, a
buck carried by said support, a shoe, a carriage
for said shoe for moving said shoe into register
with said buck, means connecting said carriage
to said support to allow pivotal and sliding move
ment with respect to said support, locking means
rendered effective by sliding movement of said
carriage for preventing displacement of said car
riage by pressing forces, and means for relatively 15
an arm connected to said'support to allow pivotal
moving said buck and shoe into pressing engage
and sliding movement with respect to said sup
ment.
~
port, said connection comprising a pin within an
10. An ironing press comprising a support, a.
elongated slot, a notch in said arm, a shoe car
buck carried by said support having an upwardly
ried by said carriage and movable thereby to a presented work receiving surface, a carriage at 20
position in register with said buck, means engaged
the rear of the buck having a shoe `supporting
by ’said notch upon sliding movement of said car
arm, a handle carried by said arm for moving
riage for locking said carriage in this position, . the carriage, a shoe carried by said arm, and
and means for relatively moving said buck and means pivoting said carriage on said support for
said shoe into pressing engagement.
pivotal movement about a fixed point below and 25
4. An ironing press comprising a support, a
to the rear of the center line of the buck whereby
buck carried by said support, a carriage having said shoe is swung toward said buck as it is
an arm connected to said support to allow pivotal
moved from the out-of-register position at the
and sliding movement with respect to said sup
rear of the buck to the in-register position above
30
port, said connection comprising a pin within an the buck.
_
elongated slot, a notch in said arm, a shoe car
ll. In an ironing press, a buck having spaced
ried by said carriage and movable thereby to a ribs, a wire mesh screen on said ribs, a pad of
position in register with said buck, a rod carried
iìbrous material on said screen, said pad being
by said support, said rod being engaged by said
:a LA notchI on forward sliding of said carriage for lock
ing said carriage in this position, and means for
relatively moving said buck and said shoe into
pressing engagement.
5. In an ironing press, a buck having spaced
40 ribs, a wire mesh screen on said ribs, a pad of
ñbrous material on said screen, said pad being
vapor pervious throughout substantially its entire
surface whereby the steam generated during iron
ing flows directly through the pad and through
the mesh of the screen, and means enclosing the
under side of the screen and spaced therefrom
for protecting the screen from the atmosphere.
6. In an ironing press, a buck having spaced
ribs, a wire mesh screen on said ribs, a pad of
fibrous materialI on said screen, said pad being
vapor pervious throughout substantially its entire
surface whereby the steam generated during iron
ing ñows directly through the pad and through
the mesh of the screen, and means including a
lower wall below said ribs for protecting the under
side of the screen from`the atmosphere.
7. In an ironing press, a buck having a lower
wall, spaced ribs above and extending trans
versely of said lower wall, said ribs and said lower
60 wall providing a space for drainage of moisture
vapor pervious throughout substantially its entire
surface whereby the steam generated during iron
ing flows directly through the pad and through
the mesh of the screen, and means for condens
ing the steam generated during ironing below
said `screen for protecting the underside of the
screen whereby the> pad will be maintained dry. 40
12. In an ironing press, a buck having a wire
mesh screen, a pad of fibrous material on said
screen, said pad being vapor pervious throughout
substantially its entire surface whereby the steam
generated during ironing ñows directly through 45
the pad and through the mesh of the screen, sup
ports for lsaid screen having a spacing relatively
-great compared to the mesh of the screen, a shoe
adapted to cooperate with said buck, the tempera
ture and heat capacity of said shoe being sutil 50
cient to convert the moisture in the material
being ironed into steam which flows through said
pad, and means for condensing said steam below
said screen and for protecting the underside of
the screen from the atmosphere whereby the pad 55
will be maintained dry.
13. In an ironing press, a support, a buck car
ried by said support having an upwardly pre
sented work receiving surface, a carriage at the
rear of the buck having a shoe supporting arm, 60
along the lower wall beneath said ribs, a wire _ a handle carried by said arm for moving said car
mesh screen on said ribs, a pad of ñbrous mate
riage, a shoe carried by said arm, and means for
rial on said screen, said pad being vapor pervious mounting the carriage on said support below said
throughout substantially its entire surface where
buck for pivotal movement about a fixed point
and sliding movement with respect to said point 65
65 by the steam generated during ironing flows di
rectly through the pad and through the mesh of whereby said shoe is movable to an in-register
the screen, and means including said lower wall
position above said buck and to an out-of-register
for protecting` said screen from the atmosphere. ` position at the rear of said buck, the mounting for
8. In an ironing press, a buck having spaced the carriage being such that the carriage has a
ribs, a wire mesh screen on said ribs, the spacing rearward sliding movement at the start of the
of the ribs being relatively great compared to the movement of the shoe froml the in-register
mesh of said screen, a pad of fibrous material on
said screen, said pad being vapor pervious
position.
v
-
GEORGE W. WARDWELL, Jn.
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