close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2110211

код для вставки
March 8, 1938.
J, P, FARRELL
2,110,211 -
CARBURETOR CONTROL
Filed May 20, 1952
v
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
v
66
I?"
9,, .z/
INVENTOR.
James % /'?//z//
lubgazwrzw
4770mm
March 8, 1938.
J, p_ FARRELL
2,110,211
CARBURETOR ‘CONTROL
Filed May 20, 1952
$9,, 5,;
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
’ jg/jm
A TTORNE YS.
Patented Mar. 8, 1938
2,110,211
'NI'TED' STATES PATENT OFFICE
‘2,110,211
cennonnron coN'rnoL
James P. Farrell, Berkeley, Calif.
Application May 20, 1932, Serial No. 612,533
15 Claims. (Cl. 261-39)
My invention relates to means for controlling
Figure 9 shows the mechanism of Figure 8 in
a carburetor used in conjunction with an internal a different position.
combustion‘ engine and is especially useful in
Figure 10 shows the mechanism of Figure 8 in
conjunction with carburetors on automotive ve
hicles:
Itis customary in starting an internal com
bustion engine from cold to reduce materially the
proportion of air in the fuel-air mixture, and
after the engine has arrived at operating tem
10 perature to restore the proportions to their run
ning values. An engine after having been started
and while still cold can only with great diiiiculty
be idled or run slowly, partly because of the added
friction due to viscous oil and also because of
15 various other factors. If the proportion of air
and fuel is very carefully regulated, a cold en
gine can nevertheless be run relatively slowly or
alternatively if the air-fuelvmixture is not pre
cisely regulated then the engine must be run
20 somewhat faster.
It is therefore an object of my invention to
provide an automatic means for permitting an
engine to run relatively rapidly when cold.
Another object of my invention is to provide
a mechanism which will cause an engine to run
relatively rapidly when cold but which will per
mit the engine to run relatively slowly when it has
arrived at its operating temperature.
A further object of my invention is to provide
30 a speed regulating mechanism on a carburetor
which is self-contained and is independent of the
customary throttle linkage and closure springs.
The foregoing and other objects are attained
in the embodiment of the invention shown in the
drawings, in which
another position.
‘
Figure 11 shows the throttle valve of Figure 8
in plan.
1
‘
In its preferred form, the carburetor control
of my invention is adapted to be used in con
junction with a carburetor adapted to furnish a
?uid fuel mixture and which is provided with a 10
valve for preventing ?ow of said mixture, and
includes means for permitting an auxiliary ?ow
under control of a thermostat.
In the form of the ‘device disclosed in Figures
1 and 2 there is illustrated part of the induction 15
mechanism of an engine, in this instance a por
tion of a standard carburetor having a cylindrical
wall 6 defining a carburetor throat ‘I through
which a combustible fuel mixture is designed to
?ow in the direction of the arrow 8. The pressure 20
adjacent the arrow 8 is considerably higher than
the pressure in the region 9 and causes the flow
through the throat ‘I. The wall 8 merges into a
?ange ll provided with suitable apertures I2 for
the reception of fastening devices for securing
the carburetor to the manifold of the engine with
which the device is utilized.
In order to control ?ow through the throat 7,
bosses I 4 and I8 formed integrally with the wall
are pierced by a throttle shaft l3 on which is
mounted a butter?y valve or disc 11, and at one
end of which is a lever i 8 designed to be con
30
nected to the usual throttle operating linkage.
Such linkage customarily is manually or pedally
impelled in one direction to move the disc I‘! to
open or non-obstructing position, and is returned
to move the disc to closed or obstructing position
of a carburetor throat with the carburetor con
by means of a relatively stiff and powerful spring.
trol of my invention incorporated therewith.
Figure 2 is a cross section the plane of which Because of such spring I have found it impractical
to provide a mechanism for holding the throttle 40
is indicated by the line 2—2 of Figure 1.
Figure 3 is a plan of a modi?ed form of car- . shaft I3 in slightly open position to give faster
buretor control in accordance with my invention. idling speeds when the engine is cold.
In lieu of such an arrangement and as an im
Figure 41s a cross section, the plane of which
provement thereover, I preferably pierce the disc
is indicated by the lines 4-4 of Figure 3.
Figure 1 is a cross section on a dlametral plane
Figure 5 is a cross section on a dlametral plane
of a still ‘further modi?ed form ‘of carburetor
control of my invention.
Figure 6 is a plan of a different form of control
suitable for use with the carburetor of Figure 1.
Figure 7 is a side elevation of the mechanism
shown in Figure 6.
.
I‘! with a plurality of conduits or passages l9
which permit ?ow from one side of the disc to the
other by virtue of the difference in pressure and
further provide a thermostat 2| so that ?ow can
occur freely through the apertures or conduits
I9 when the engine is cold, but will be prevented 50.
when the engine is warm.
In the present instance, the thermostat is com
prised of a bimetallic disc including a ?rst metal
a different form of carburetor control of my sheet 22 and a second metal sheet 23 having dif
invention.
' ferent coef?cients of expansion. Since these
Figure 8 is a cross section on an axial plane of
2
2,110,211
sheets are united, under the in?uence of varying
,
but heat radiates thereto from the surrounding
temperature, they snap quickly from one extreme ’ parts and causes a further increase in tempera
position to a second extreme position through a a ture of the thermostatic strip 43. ‘Such addi
median planar posi on. In order that the disc tional increase in temperature causes a movement
of the disc 3| into a position such as “C”. Inthis
a 2| can. suitably be he , I preferably pass a bolt
24 through the throttle shaft l3 and through the position ?ow through the aperture 3| is again
disc 2| and the. butter?y valve H. The bolt is permitted, so that if the engine is again started.
retained by a suitable nut 26 and, if desired, a during the period of increased temperature con— '
washer 21 can be interposed between the disc 2| ’ siderable auxiliary mixture is permitted to ?ow
10 and the throttle shaft |3.. Withthis arrange
ment, when the parts are relatively cold the disc
2| assumes the position shown in Figure 1, per
mitting ample idling ?ow through the-conduits or
apertures l9, despite the fact that the main but
ter?y valve |'| may be in closed position. As‘ the
temperature increases due to continued operation
of the engine, at a critical value the disc 2| snaps
into its other extreme position closely'overlying
the aperturesor conduits l9 and thus acting as a
valve to prevent ?ow therethrough, and thus con
?ning the ?ow of ‘mixture past the butter?y valve
disc I‘! simply to the leakage thereby. There is
thus provided a mechanism which automatically
permits-a greater flow of combustible mixture
25 past the butter?y valve when the parts are cold
than is permitted when the parts are warm.
I have found in practice that it is usual for
-the wall 6 of the carburetor throat to expand
much differently under variations in temperature
30 than the butter?y valve disc I8 and thus to cause
20
for starting purposes. As soon as a material ?ow 10
of air and particularly 'of cold gasoline or other
fuel strikes the thermostatic strip 43, the disc 36
is immediately drawn to position “13" and pre
vents further auxiliary ?ow.
In installations in‘ which it is not desirable to 15
mount the mechanism directly on the butter?y
throttle valve itself, I preferably provide the
structure shown in Figure 5, in which the wall 46
of the carburetor throat 41 isv provided with a
relatively small passage 33 shunting the butter?y. 20
valve 49. Flow through the passage 38 is gov
erned‘by a balanced disc valve 5| mounted on a
shaft 52 and having a depending fork .53 encom
passing the free end of a thermostatic strip 56,
the other end of'which is anchored as at 51 to 25
the wall 46. Access to the passage 38 is prefer
ably gained by removal of a suitable plug 58.
When the temperature of the parts is relatively
low, the thermostatic strip 56 forces the valve 5|
at least to partially open position and permits the 30
erratic operation, especially erratic idling. To ; passage of‘an auxiliary ?ow of mixture around
overcome this de?ciency I preferably counterbore the butter?y valve 49, even through the latter
the’carburetor throat wall 6 and insert therein
a sleeve 21
of material such as inv-ar.
The
35 throttle disc I‘! is then also made of inv'ar.
Since
these parts are of the same material and are of a
material which has a relatively low coe?lcient of
expansion, the clearance between the throttle
disc I‘! and the wall of the throat ‘I is maintained
substantially constant.
'
In the event that pulsations and ?uctuations
. in pressure within the throat 1 are sufficient to
cause deleterious and audible vibration of the disc
2|, I preferably employ in place thereof a mech
45 anism including a balanced valve which inherent
ly is not subject to disturbance by pressure pulsa
tions or ?uctuations.
As shown in Figures 3 and
4, there is provideda main butter?y valve'or disc
28 which is formed with a central aperture 29
valve. is in closed position, However, when the
parts are relatively warm the thermostatic strip
56 operates to close the valve 5| and to preclude 35
further ?ow through the passage 36.
In the form of my invention disclosed in Fig
ures 6 and '7, a throttle disc 6| is provided with a
thermostatic strip 62 at one end anchored to a
bracket 63 mounted on the throttle disc and at 40
the other end carrying a plate valve 64 adapted to
overlie an elongated aperture‘66 piercing the disc
6|. When the parts are relatively warm the plate
64 fully overlies the aperture 66 and precludes
auxiliary ?ow therethrough, while when the parts 45
are relatively cold the thermostatic strip 62 moves
in such a fashion as touncover part or all of
the aperture 66 and to permit auxiliary mixtur
‘ ?ow therethrough.
»
50 for the receptionwof a fastening means for secur
In ‘all of the forms of my device in which the 50
, ing the valve to a throttle shaft such as I3. The ‘thermostatic element is mounted on the throttle
disc is likewise pierced by acircular aperture 3|, disc itself, it is usually preferable to mount the
through which, whenthe aperture is unobstruct
strip on the high pressure side of the throat so,
ed, an auxiliary mixture ?ow can occur. Mount
ed on suitable trunnions 32 and 33 ?xed on the
,55 disc 28 is a cross shaft 34 carrying a balanced disc
valve 36. The valve is provided with a pitman
39, pivoted thereto, as at 4|, which is likewise piv
oted as at 42 to the free extremity of a bimetallic
thermostatic
strip 43. This strip is anchored to
60
the. disc 28 by suitable fastening means 44.
In this arrangement when the parts are rela-.
that the incoming stream of air .or air and fuel
which is relatively cool can maintain the ther 55
mostat at a relatively low temperature. Under
certain conditions, however, successful results
have been obtained by mounting the thermostatic
element on the low pressure side of ‘the disc where
it is somewhat protected from the incoming 60
stream of fuel mixture.
It is often advisable to provide a mechanism
tively cold the thermostatic strip 43 maintains - which can be installed in standard carburetors
the valve disc 36 substantially in the position “A” without substantial change thereof, but which will”
shown in Figure 4, permitting considerably aux
nevertheless be suitable for installation in new
65
iliary ?ow through the aperture 3|. As‘the parts designs of carburetors. Such mechanism is dis 65.
increase in temperature, the strip 43 through the closed in Figures 8 to 11, inclusive. - As shown
medium of the pitman 39 rocks the disc 36 from therein, there is provided a conduit which, for
the position "A” into a position “B” in which the
disc is coplanarwith the butter?y disc 23, and
?ow through the aperture 3| is substantially pre
vented.
After an engine ‘has arrived at operating tem
perature and has been shut down,‘ fuel ?ow
75 through thethroat of the carburetor has ceased,
example, is a carburetor throat defined by a wall
1| having ?anges ‘I2 thereon pierced by apertures 70
13 for the reception of fastening devices for secur
ing the mechanism to a suitable support. In
the customary way, mixture ?ows through the
passage 14 de?ned by the wall 1| and is pref
erably controlled by a throttle or butter?y valve, 75
9,110,211
generally designated 18. This throttle is prefer
ably mounted on a throttle shaft 11 which is suit
ably journalled in the wall ‘Ii. Rotation of the
throttle shaft moves the throttle valve 16 to
govern the flow through the conduit 14. As
shown in Figure 8, the throttle disc, when on a
slight incline, abuts the wall ‘H throughout its
entire periphery and substantially closes the pas
sage ‘N.
_
I
In order that there can be an auxiliary ?ow
through the passage ‘II when the engine to which
the carburetor control is attached is relatively
cold, to increase the idling speed automatically,
I preferably fabricate the valve 16 in the form
of discs 18 and 19 which are composed of two
metals having widely diiferent coef?cients of ex
pansion. Preferably, the metal of the disc 19
is invar, while the metal of the disc ‘I8 is brass,
for instance. In order that the difference in
20 expansion rates of these metals will be rela
tively ineffective in the direction of the axis of
the shaft 11, I preferably ‘sever the sheet 78 into
a multiplicity of strips by a plurality of parallel
cuts 8|, as disclosed in Figure 11.
Because of this construction, when the engine is
relatively cold the brass disc 18 is somewhat
shorter than the invar disc 19 in the direction of
the cuts BI, and therefore causes the valve 16 to
take the shape shown in Figure 9, allowing a
30 slight passage between the edge of the valve and
the wall ‘II. It is to be understood that Figures 9
and 10 are both greatly exaggerated, inasmuch as
only a small clearance between the valve and the
wall ‘H is required and obtained. On the other
hand, when the engine is in normal operating
condition, the valve 16 is substantially as shown
in Figure 8. Just after the engine has been run
and has been shut down, additional heat radiates
to the valve 16. This heat is not dissipated since
40 there is no cooling ?ow of air and gasoline, so
that the temperature of the valve 16 continues to
increase. The valve then ?exes in a direction to
make an additional opening as shown in Figure
10, which assists momentarily in a subsequent
45 start of the engine.
I claim:
1. A carburetor control comprising a carburetor
throat through which a fuel mixture ?ows, a
butterfly valve adapted when closed to prevent
50 ?ow through said throat, said butter?y valve hav
ing a conduit therethrough, a valve movable with
said butter?y valve for controlling ?ow through
said conduit, and thermostatic means for actuat
ing said valve.
2. A carburetor control comprising a carbu
retor throat through which a fuel mixture ?ows,
Y a butter?y disc adapted’ when closed to prevent
?ow through said throat, said disc having a fuel
mixture passage therethrough, and temperature
responsive means movable with said disc for con
trolling ?ow through said passage.
3. A carburetor control comprising a carbu
retor throat through which a fuel mixture ?ows,
a butter?y disc adapted when closed to prevent
65 flow through said throat, said disc having a fuel
_ mixture passage therethrough, and a thermostat
mounted on said ‘butter?y disc for controlling ?ow
through said passage.
70
4. A carburetor control comprising a carbu
retor throat through which a fuel mixture ?ows,
a butter?y disc adapted when closed to prevent
flow through said throat, said disc having a fuel
mixture passage therethrough, a valve for con
trolling ?ow through said passage, and a thermo
3
-
stat mounted on said butter?y disc for actu
ating said valve.
5. A carburetor control comprising a car
buretor throat through which a_ fuel mixture
?ows, a butter?y disc adapted when closed to
prevent flow through said throat, said disc hav
ing a fuel mixture passage therethrough, a valve
movable with said disc for‘ controlling ?ow
through said passage, and a thermostat adapt
ed to open said valve in response to a relative 10
1y‘ low temperature and to close said valve in re
sponse to a relatively high temperature.
6. A carburetor control comprising a car
buretor throat through which a fuel mixture
?ows, a butter?y disc on opposite sides of which 15'
different pressures exist and adapted when
closed to prevent ?ow through said throat, said
disc having a fuel mixture passage therethrough,
a. valve unaffected by said di?’erent pressures for
controlling ?ow through said passage, and a
thermostat mounted on said butter?y disc and
adapted to open said valve in response to a
relatively low temperature and to close said
valve in response to a relatively high tempera
ture.
‘
'
7. A carburetor control comprising a car
25
buretor throat through which a fuel mixture
?ows, an operating shaft spanning said throat, a
throttle disc ?xed on said shaft, and thermo
statically controlled means entirely supported ‘
by said disc for lessening the eifective area of
said disc.
8. A carburetor control comprising a car
buretor duct through which fuel mixture ?ows,
a transverse shaft spanning said duct, a butter 35
?y valve on said shaft and adapted to be moved
from a flow restricting position in close prox
imity to the walls of said duct to an open position
remote from the walls of said duct, and thermal
ly-controlled means unaffected by the proximity 40
of said valve to said walls of said duct for ‘con
ducting ?uid from one side of said butter?y valve
to the other side thereof.
9. A carburetor control comprising a car
buretor duct through which fuel mixture ?ows, 45
a, butter?y valve relatively movable in said duct
and adapted by its relative position in said duct
to control ?uid ?ow therethrough, means includ
ing a passage the cross sectional area of which
isindependent of the relative position of said but 50
ter?y valve for conducting ?uid from one side
of said butter?y valve to the other side thereof,
and thermally responsive means for controlling
said conducting means.
10. A carburetor control comprising a car
buretor duct, a fuel mixture throttling valve 55
therein, said throttling valve having a passage
therein, a valve carried by said throttling valve
and co-operating with said passage, and tem
perature responsive means for controlling said
valve.
11. A carburetor control comprising a car
60
buretor duct, an operating shaft spanning said
duct, 2. fuel mixture throttling valve on said shaft,
means supported entirely by said operating shaft
for lessening the effective area of said throttling 65
valve, and thermally responsive means for con
trolling said lessening means.
12. A carburetor control comprising a car
buretor passage through which a ?uid ?ows, a
butter?y valve adapted when closed substantial
70
ly to prevent ?ow through said passage, said but- .
ter?y valve having a conduit therethrough, a sub
stantially balanced valve movable with said but
ter?y valve for controlling ?ow through said 75
9,110,211‘
4
conduit, and thermostatic means for actuating
said valve.
' 13. A carburetor control comprising means
having therein a main fuel mixture passage, a
throttle valve in said passage, means having
therein a by-pass passage communicating with
said main fuel mixture passage through separate
openings spaced apart to lie on opposite sides of
said throttle valve, and a thermally responsive
valve for controlling fuel mixture flow through
said by-pass passage.
}
14. A carburetor control comprising a car
buretor duct, a butter?y valve in said duct for
controlling fuel mixture ?ow therethrough,
means forming a passage having walls which
‘are fixed relative to each other for conducting
fluid fromone side of said butter?y valve to
the other side thereof, and a temperature-re
sponsive valve for controlling said pasage.
15. A carburetor control ‘comprising a car‘
buretor passage through which a fuel mixture
?ows, a butter?y valve in said passage for con
trolling ?ow .therethrcugh, a conduit having
walls which are ?xed relative to each other
shunting said butter?y valve, and thermostatic
mans for varying the e?ective area of said con
JAMES P. FARRELL.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
627 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа