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Патент USA US2110667

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March 8, 1938.
4
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G, HUBER
'
2,110,667‘
1
‘
SEAM FOR SEWING TOGETHER FABRIC
Fileqd Jan. 7, 1955
2 Shee£s~Sheet 1
arch 8, 1938.
G. HUBER
2,110,667
SEAM FOR SEWING TOGETHER FABRIC
Filed Jan. 7, 1935
.
f
/
r
I
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2 Sheets-Sheet 2
2,110,667
Patented Mar. 8, 1938
Ni'i‘E
STATES
2,110,667
SEAM FOR SEWING TOGETHER FABRIC
Gustav Huber, Stuttgart, Germany
Application January 7, 1935, Serial No. 731
In Germany January 6, 1934
8 Claims.
(Cl. 112-268)
(Granted under the provisions of sec. 14, act of
March 2, 1927; 357 0. G. 5)
The subject-matter of the invention is the pro
duction of a seam for connecting pieces of cloth
so that the seam on one side of the sewed-to
gether pieces is invisible.
For the production of such a seam, the pieces
of cloth to be connected are, in the usual way,
placed side-by-side with their upturned rela
tively positioned edges, whereupon the edges are
sewed together and are overseamed.
Heretofore, such seams were produced in this
10
way, that at ?rst the edges were sewed together
by means of a ?rst seam and then the said seam
was covered by an overseam, in which the
pieces of cloth were stitched with a blind stitch.
' Moreover, heretofore such seams were made in
such a way, that they were made by means of
two needles, one of said needles stitching one
of the pieces of cloth with a blind stitch and
then passing through the edges, whereas the
other needle ?rst stitched the other piece or" cloth
20
with a blind stitch in the opposite direction and
then stitching through the edges, the needle
threads being then looked at the entrance and
exit stitches each by a looper-thread.
These heretofore used stitching methods of
such a seam, however, have considerable disad
vantages. Especially the last named manner of
stitching has the disadvantage, that for the two
needles two stitching devices are required, re
30 sulting in a complication of the machine, because
of the driving mechanisms required for operating
the needles, as well as in a difficult operation of
such a machine, especially in case of’ disturb
ances, where, for instance, the thread breaks,
35 aside from the fact, that because of the distance
between the needles, sharp edges can not be
sewed.
Contrary thereto, in accordance with the pres
ent invention such a seam is produced with the
40 aid of only one straight or curved needle, which
passes perpendicular or at an angle. relative to
the feed of the cloth or oscillates relative there
to. For this purpose, the needle at each opera
tion is guided in the same direction, so that alter
45 nately it stitches at one movement ?rst the one
piece of cloth
the manner of a blind stitch and
then the upright positioned edges of the two
pieces of cloth, while during ‘the next movement
it first stitches the upright positioned edges of the
pieces of cloth and then the second piece of cloth
in the manner of a blind stitch, whereupon the
timely guided needle thread is locked at the en
tering and exit places by the looper thread cover
ing the upright positioned edges. A further
55 feature of the invention consists in this, that
for the production of a very ?at seam the orig
inally upright positioned edges of the pieces of
cloth prior to being sewed together, are sepa
rated and are partly turned down and there
upon are entirely turned down in the plane of
the pieces of cloth by the seam made according to
this invention.
On the drawings, the invention is diagram
matically shown by way of illustration in two
embodiments. In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a per 10
spective view of the seam production in dia
grammatic illustration. Fig. 2 shows the 3
thread seam, shownv in Fig. l, on an enlarged
scale (the same being produced by a needle-thread
and two looper threads).
Fig. 3 shows on an en
15
larged scale a correspondingly made 2-thread
seam (made with one needle thread and one
looper thread). Fig. 4 is a section along A—B
in Fig. 3; Fig. 5 is a section along C--D in Fig. 3;
Fig. 6 is a perspective view of another embodi 20
ment of the invention shown diagrammatically.
Fig. '7 shows on an enlarged scale the. 3-thread
seam shown in Fig. 6 (produced by one needle
thread and two looper threads).
Fig. 8 shows
on an enlarged scale a correspondingly produced
Z-thread seam (made by one needle thread and
one looper thread). Fig. 9 is a section along A-B
in Fig. 7; Fig. 10 is a section along C—-D in
Fig. 7 ; Fig. 11 is a section along E-F in Fig. 8;
Fig. 12 is a section along G——I-I in Fig. 8.
According to the invention, the sewing to
gether and overseaming of the placed-together
edges of the pieces of cloth i and 2 to be con
nected, is performed in the following manner:
The pieces of cloth 5 and 2 are placed with
their upright positioned edges 6 and l on the
pressure plates 3 and ii of the sewing machine
table, which pressure plates, by means of springs
5, are preferably yieldingly mounted, as shown in
Fig. 1. The upright relatively positioned edges
t, l, of the pieces of cloth i, 2, are pressed down
by the tongue ii, which is resiliently pressed
against the front of the edges of the cloth, so
that a very flat seam is produced.
The pieces
of cloth l, 2, moreover, are held and guided by
the pressure feet 9, iii, the latter being so dis
posed, that they press. the edges of the cloth
under a certain resilient pressure against each
other to be sewed. These thusly guided pieces of '
cloth are now sewed together without a prelimi
nary seam by means of a straight or curved
needle. ll, which is moved or oscillated nerpen~
dicularly or anguiarly relative to- the feed of the
pieces of cloth. For this purpose the needle
thread it is guided by the needle H in such a 55
2
2,110,667
way, that the needle H ?rst passes through the
one piece of cloth, e. g. the piece of cloth 2 at I3
in the manner of a blind stitch and then passes
through the relatively upturned edges '6, 1,
whereas, at the next movement, it passes through
the upright positioned edges 6, l, and then
through the other piece of cloth, the piece of
cloth 5, at M, in the manner of a blind stitch.
This sequence of stitches is alternately con
tinued, the needle thread ['2 being every time
locked by the looper thread l5 at the entering
and exit places. These lockings between the
needle thread and the looper thread, therefore,
occur once at the entrance places of the blind
15 stitches and, on the other hand, at the edges of
the pieces of cloth.
It is obvious that the locking of the needle
thread l2 can be effected with only one looper
thread 55 or also with two looper threads, I5’, 552.
20
Such a .‘Z-thread seam with a looper thread is
shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, whereas in Figs. 1 and 2
is shown a B-threaded seam with two looper
threads.
The stitching of the pieces of cloth I and 2 in
25 the manner of a blind stitch is made possible by
down substantially into parallelism with and in
slightly spaced relation to the main body of the
material.
In this case, the sewing together and overseam
ing of the placed-together edges of the pieces of
cloth 25 and 2? to be connected, occurs as follows:
he pieces of cloth 2t and 2'! are placed to 10
gether with their upright relatively positioned
edges 39 and (ii ‘on the pressure plates 28 and 29
on the sewing machine table, which pressure
plates are also yieldingly mounted, like the pres
sure plates 3 and 4 in Fig. 1. The upright rela 15
tively positioned edges 30 and 3|, prior to the
stitching by the needle 32, are separated from
each other by a correspondingly shaped tongue
33 and are partly laterally turned down. When
the edges of the pieces of cloth occupy this posi
tion shown in Fig. 6, the needle pierces the same
in such a way, that it ?rst pierces the one piece of
cloth, for instance the piece 21 at 34 in the man
ner of a blind stitch, and thereupon pierces the
edges of the two pieces of cloth and thereupon the 25
arching members, which somewhat raise the
cloth. In the embodiment shown, this purpose is
served by the arching pins l6 and H, which are
alternately operated from the sewing machine
other piece of cloth at 35, also in the manner of a
blind stitch. At the next movement of the nee
shaft by means of a lever transmission It.
cloth.
The arching pins, instead of being thus alter
nately operated, can also be operated so that only
either one or the other pin presents the cloth to
the needle H for stitching, in which case the
35 locking together of the needle thread and looper
thread is done on that side, on which the arching
pin is not operated, the locked thread then lying
directly on the corresponding edge of the cloth,
in which event the seam is ?attened only toward
40 one side, as shown by Figs. 4 and 5.
The locking of the needle thread and looper
thread occurs in this way, that, for instance, the
needle ?rst passes through the edges of the pieces
of cloth and then stitches the one piece of cloth,
45 for instance at id, in the manner of a blind
stitch. After this forward movement, the looper
i@, which swings from the left upwards toward
the right as the needle ll goes back, enters
through the needle thread loop 29, presented to
50 it by the needle ll and brings its looper thread
i5’ to
thread
toward
thread
the looper 2!, which carries the looper
E52. rI‘his looper swings from above
the right below and brings its looper
loop 22 to the needle H during the next
55 forward movement of the same, so that in ‘this
manner the locking of the needle thread ! 2 is
effected. In the production of a Z-thread seam
with only one looper thread, the looper 2! does
not carry a covering thread, but engages the cov
60 ering thread 95 carried by the looper l9 and
brings the same to the other side of the needle I l .
It is obvious that the lockings can occur in any
desired sequence and in any desired selection of
65
each other or partly turned down and then are
sewed together and overseamed by only one nee
dle, so that the edges of the material are turned
the ratio of the number of stitches.
The invention enables the production of a scam
in which the pieces of cloth are sewed together
with their upright positioned edges and are over
seamed and this by means of only one needle, so
that a very durable and flat seam is produced.
A further embodiment of the invention is
shown in Figs. 6 to 12, in which case the ad
vantage is obtained, that the seam still becomes
?atter, which is effected in this way, that the
orig naily upright relatively positioned edges,
75 prior to being sewed together, are separated from
dle, the needle 32 pierces merely the edges of the
cloth at 36, 3?, without piercing the pieces of
The needle thread 38, carried by the nee
dle 32, being thus alternately guided thereby, is
then locked with the looper thread 39, the lock
ings between the needle thread 38 and the looper
thread 39 corresponding to the thus described
movements of the needle 32, occurring only at 35
the entrance places of the blind stitches in the
one sequence of stitches, whereas during the other
sequence of stitches the lockings occur only at the
edges of the pieces of cloth, that is at 35, 31.
The edges of the cloth which prior to the pierc 40
ing of the needle 32 have been partly turned down
by the tongue 53, are further turned down after
the next sequence of stitches by the overseam
thread 39 locked at the places of the blind
stitches, so that the originally upright positioned 45
edges are turned down substantially into parallel
ism with and in slightly spaced relation to the
main body of the material, resulting in a very ?at
seam. Preferably, the pieces of cloth 26, 2?, are
guided by the pressure plates 42 acting in the
manner of a pressure foot.
It is evident that the needle thread guided in
the above mentioned sequence of stitches can be
locked with one overseam thread as well as with
two overseam threads, the nature of the seam not i
being changed thereby.
Such a Z-thread seam is
shown in Figs. 8, 1]. and 12, whereas Figs. 6, '7, 9
and 10 show the 3-thread seam. The 3-thread
seam diii’ers from the 2-thread seam merely in
this, that the 2 looper threads 35', 39", are inter
looped in the center of the ?at seam at M .
In the sequence of stitches, in which the pieces
of cloth are pierced in the manner of a blind
stitch, the piece of cloth is presented to the needle
to be pierced thereby by any desired arching 65
members. In accordance with the embodiment
in Fig. 6, two arching pins 4!} are used for this
purpose, which are simultaneously operated.
It is obvious, that the order of stitches of the
stitch sequence I (blind stitch, piercing, blind
stitch as shown by Figs. 9 and ll) and of the
stitch. sequence II (piercing such as shown by
Figs. 10 and 12) can be varied as desired, that is
to say, that for instance, in place of the con
tinual alternation the stitch sequence I or the
3
2,110,667
stitch sequence II can be carried out several times
in succession.
By the formation of the seam in the above
described manner, aside from the production of
Cl an extremely ?at seam, the further advantage
is obtained that the lockings 36, 31, located at
the edges, come to lie under the turned-down
edges 3i), 3 I.
Obviously, the seam according to this inven
10 tion can be made instead of with only one needle,
also with two needles working in succession and
either one or two overseam threads.
I claim:
1. A seam connecting and o-verseaming pieces
of cloth having their edge portions upturned and
abutting, said seam comprising a single needle
thread passing back and forth through the up
turned edge portions of the pieces of cloth and
also through each piece of cloth in the form of
blind stitches at points spaced from the said
55
from one side of the said upturned edges through
said upturned edges and then through one of
the pieces of cloth in the form of a blind stitch 10
at a point spaced from said upturned edges, then
reversely from said blind stitch back through the
said upturned edges, then, at the next stitch, '
passing ?rst through the other piece of cloth in
the form of a blind stitch at a point spaced from 15
the said upturned edges, then through the said
upturned edges, then reversely through said up
turned edges back to said second mentioned
blind stitch and so on throughout succeeding
stitches, and looper thread means overlying said
with said single needle thread at said blind stitch
points, at the point of beginning each alternate
edges.
stitch directly adjacent to the upturned edge of
one of the pieces of cloth, and at the point of
reversal of the needle thread at each of the other
alternate stitches directly adjacent to the up
turned edge of the other of the pieces of cloth,
whereby the said upturned edges are bound to
gether against separation and an overseam is 30
provided overlying the said upturned edges.
of cloth having their edge portions upturned and
5. A seam as set forth in claim 3 in which the
abutting, said seam comprising a single needle
thread passing back and forth through the up
looper thread means comprises a single looper
thread.
35 turned edge portions of the'pieces of cloth and
50
abutting, said seam comprising a single needle
thread passing at the beginning of one stitch
ing back and forth over the said upturned edges
and having loops some of which cooperate with
said single needle thread at said blind stitch
points and others of which cooperate with said
single needle thread directly adjacent to each of
2. A seam connecting and oversearning pieces
45
4. A seam connecting and overseaming pieces
of cloth having their edge portions upturned and
upturned edges and having loops cooperating
edges are bound together against separation and
an overseam is provided overlying said upturned
40
seam is provided overlying said upturned edges.
upturned edges, and looper thread means pass
said upturned edges, whereby the upturned
30
upturned edges, whereby the upturned edges are ‘
bound together against separation and an over
also through each piece of cloth in the form of
blind stitches at points spaced from the said up
turned edges, and a plurality of looper threads
extending over the said upturned edges and hav
ing loops some of which cooperate with said single
needle thread at said blind stitch points and
others of which cooperate with said single needle
thread directly adjacent to each of said up—
turned edges, whereby the upturned edges are
bound together against separation and an over
seam is provided overlying said upturned edges.
3. A seam connecting and overseaming pieces
of cloth having their edge portions upturned and
abutting, said seam comprising a single needle
thread passing back and forth through the up
turned edge portions of the pieces of cloth and
also through each piece of cloth in the form of
blind stitches at points spaced from the said up
turned edges, and a single looper thread passing
back and forth over the said upturned edges and
having loops some of which cooperate with said
single needle thread at said blind stitch points
and others of which cooperate with said single
needle thread directly adjacent to each of said
6. A seam as set forth in claim 3 in which the 35
looper thread means comprises a plurality of
looper threads.
7. A seam connecting and overseaming pieces
of cloth having their edge portions upturned and
abutting, said seam comprising a single needle 40
thread passing at each alternate stitch back
and forth through the said upturned edges and
also through each piece of cloth in the‘ form of a
blind stitch at points spaced from said upturned
edges, said single needle thread at each inter 45
mediate stitch passing back and forth through
only the said upturned edges, and looper thread
means overlying said upturned edges and hav
ing loops cooperating with said single‘ needle
thread at said blind stitch points and also with 50
each intermediate stitch of said single needle
thread directly adjacent to each of said upturned
edges, whereby the upturned edges are bound to
gether against separation and an overseam. is
provided overlying said upturned edges.
8. A seam as set forth in claim 7 in which the
looper thread means comprises a plurality of
looper threads.
GUSTAV HUBER.
55
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