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Патент USA US2111262

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March 15, 1938.
A. FRIEDMANN
2,111,262
KNITTING MACHINE
Original Filed Dec. ll, 1953
5 Sheets-Sheet l
albert Friedmann
BY
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Mamh 15, 193s. '
A_ FmEDMANNj
2,111,262
KNI'TTING MACHINE
Original Filed Deo. ll, 1933
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
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albert Friedmann
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»ma ATTORNEY.
March l5, 1938.
A. ERIEDMANN
2,111,262
KNITT‘ING MACHINE
Original Filed Dec. ll, 1935
5 Sheets--Sheei'l 5
Patented Mar. 15, 1938
2,111,262 -
rUNITED STATES PATENT GFFICE
2,111,262
KNITTING MACHINE
Albert Friedmann, Wyomissing, Pa., assignor to
Louis Hirsch Textile Machines, Inc., New York,
N. Y., a corporation of New York
Original application December 11, 1933, Serial No.
701,737. Divided and this application Novem
ber 15, 1934, Serial No. 753,201
15 Claims. (Cl. 66--12'0
This invention covers a new and useful im
lowed it is difûcult to obtain a good selvage for
provement in stockings, a method of producing
them, and a machine by which the method may
the reason that between the end of one course
knit with a thread and the beginning of the next
be performed.
course knit with the same thread there is a loose
p
-
The subject matter of this application has
been divided out of a copending application ñled
by me on December 11, 1933, bearing Serial No.
701,737.
y
5.
length of the thread lying across the two inter
Vening courses. Sometimes this is caught up
in the intervening courses in which case it is a
matter of chance Whether trouble results. Ordi
narily it is not caught up but hangs loosely along
In ‘the knitting of silk hosiery of ñne quality,
10 those skilled in the art have `considered it neces - the selvage where it may be cut easily or cause 10
sary to use not only the same gauge and quality needle breakage. It‘also makes neat seaming
of thread but the same identical thread for the diñicult.
knitting of the parts of the stocking which are
_By the invention of this application although
most conspicuous, such as the leg and instep. It three carriers are used to lay three separate
r was thought that only in this way could the
most uniform fabric be produced. However, in
spite of the greatest care in manufacturing the
thread the diameter of one part frequently dif
fers from that of another. The result is that in
20 the knitted fabric the courses knit from the
heavier part of the thread lie adjacent each other
so that rings or bands appear in the fabric which
are very noticeable and greatly mar the appear
ance of the stocking. So long as a single thread
is used the knitter can do little to alter the situ
'ation. However, by knitting succeeding courses
of the same kind of thread but from diñîerent
cones the courses knit from each of them may
be separated by other courses of the other
threads, the irregularities in the thread then be
coming less apparent. The socalled “ringless”
stocking is the result of this practice which‘is
becoming increasingly popular with hosiery man
ufacturers. It is knit of three separate threads
laid successively in adjacent courses so that the
same thread appears onlyin every third course.
However, the method heretofore' employed has
not been altogether satisfactory.
Three main
thread carriers are required, two of which are
idle and released from the control of their fric
tions while the other is working. When the
'working 'carrier starts .there> is danger that it
will drag across one of the idle carriers displacing
it from its correct position over a certain one of
the 'selvagedividers When the working carrier
rod strikes a stop at the end of a stroke it some
‘ times jars an idle carrier out of position. Either
ha vpening is likely to cause needle breakage and
press oifs with consequent reduced output.
Hence the machines are generally operated at
lower speed than otherwise necessary and car
rier rod arresting devices are employed which
further complicate an already complicated ma
chine.
.
‘
'
'
Furthermore, when accepted practice is fcl
threads in successive courses, a ringless fabric is 15
produced in which there are no loose selvage
threads. To the contrary, each thread is knit
into each course, and all three thread carriers
are constantly Working under control of their
respective frictions. No thread carriers are ever 20
floating free so that the danger of displacement
by jar or contact with moving thread carriers is
eliminated> without the use of arresting devices.
Therefore, the machine may be operated at the
highest practicable speed. As to the fabric, it is 25
“ringless” and its selvage is straight, firm, and
uniform and is reenforced to any width desired.
.Another advantage derived from this inven
tion is that a "triple heel” or “heel within heel” ‘
_may be knit with live carriers instead of the 30
customary minimum of seven freeing two car
riers for other uses. Since full fashioned hosiery
machines are usually equipped with only seven
carriers this is a decided improvement. A novel
means of driving the three thread carriers in the 35
desired way is also included in this invention, the
nature of which will be made clear by the follow
ing description and drawings. of which
Figure 1 illustrates diagrammatically the man
ner in which the threads are laid by thel thread 40
carriers involved in each of a series of consecu
tive courses;
Fig. 2 diagrammatically villustrates the chang
ing positions of the carrier rods involved in lay
ing the courses shown in Fig. 1;
45
Fig. 3 is adiagrammatic view of a series of
courses showing the positions of the three threads
in each as viewed from the back of the machine
looking towards the front;
y
50
y Fig. 3--A is a diagrammatic view of a series of
courses of ringless fabricvknit in the conventional
manner viewed as in Fig. 3;
Fig. 4 is a 'diagrammatic illustration of one
type of stocking embodying the invention;
65
2
2,111,262
Fig. 5 is a plan view of the knitting machine
of this invention;
Fig. 6 is a sectional "View of the machine of
Fig. 5 along the line 6_6 in the direction of the
arrows;
'
Fig. 7 is a sectional View of the machine of
Fig. 5 along the line 'I-l looking in the direction
of the arrows; and
Fig. s is a front elevation of a portion of the
10 machine of Fig. 5.
'I'he stocking of this invention is not limited to
any particular type but may be any of the types
which can be knit upon a flat knitting machine.
Figure 4, for example, is intended to illustrate
diagrammatically a full fashioned stocking leg
with a triple heel since this type well illustrates
the versatility of the invention. The noticeable
difference between this stocking and other ring
less stockings is the reenforced selvage which
20 may be extremely narrow if desired, so that it
disappears in the seam, or may be made as much
wider as desired without affecting the general
method of knitting.
As already stated the present practice in knit
25 ting ringless stockings is to use three threads
laid in rotation in successive courses, the thread
used for one course being simply carried down
across the ends of the two following courses and
then employed for the next course, that part of
30 the thread between the end of the first course
and the beginning of' the next course in which
it is used lying loose. Each thread is laid the
full width of the fabric. If reenforced selvages
are desired by this method two additional thread
35 carriers are required, one for each selvage or a
total of five thread carriers.
'By the method of this invention all of three
thread carriers Work simultaneously u_pon the
same courses, one laying the thread across the
40 entire width of the fabric and the other two lay~
ing reenforcing threads for the two selvages.
Fig. 1 illustrates diagrammatically the threads
as they are laid in each of six consecutive courses.
When as shown in diagram A of Fig. 1 thread I
is laid the full width of the stocking from left
to right thread 2 will be laid also from left to
right and also in the same course but only the
selvage from left to right as shown at l. 'I'he
second thread is laid across the left selvage also
from ~left to right as shown at 8, and the third
thread is laid across the entire width of the fabric
from left to right as shown at 9.
In the following course (diagram D of Fig. l)
the threads are laid as follows: Thread I which
in the first course was laid across the full width
of the stocking in the second course across the
right selvage in one- direction and in the third 10
course across the same selvage in the other di
rection now is again laid across the full width
of the stocking in the opposite direction, namely,
from right to left as shown at ID.
Thread 2
which in the first course was laid across the
right selvage, in the second course across the
full width of the stocking, and in the third course>
across the left selvage is now laid across the left
selvage again but in the opposite direction, from
right to left, as shown at II. Thread 3 which 20
in the first course was laid across the left selvage
from left to right, in the second course-across
the left selvage again from right to left, and
in the-third course across the full width of the
fabric from left to right is now laid from right
to left across the right selvage as shown at I2,
completing the laying of the three threads for a
course identical with the others.
.
'I'he laying of the next course is shown in dia
gram E of Fig. 1. In this threa'd I is laid from 30
left to right across the left selvage as shown at
I3. Thread 2 is laid across the entire width of
the fabric from leftV to right asshown at I4, and
thread 3 is laid across the right selvage from
left to right as shown at I5.
The laying of the next course is shown in dia
gram F of Fig. 1 as follows: Thread I is laid
across the left selvage again but in the opposite
direction from right to left as shown at I'I;
thread 2 is laid across the right selvage from 40
right to left as shown at I8; and thread 3 is .
laid across the full ywidth of the fabric from
right to left as shown at I9 completing the lay
ing of the three threads for another course simi
lar to the preceding courses.
'
Simultaneously
In the following course, as shown in diagram
G of Fig. 1 thread I begins a new cycle by laying
a thread from left to right the entire width of
thread 3 will be laid from left to right but only
the fabric as shown at 20, as in the course first
across the left selvage. When this course is knit
it will produce a fabric with a reenforced selvage
on each edge and all three threads will be con
laying a course from left to right across the rightselvage, as shown at 2l. This places thread 2
width of the right selvage.
tained therein.
'
Diagram B of Fig. 1 represents the first course
as described above, and also the second course.
In this second course the thread carriers have
traveled, of course, in the reverse direction from
right to left. Thread I which during the first
course was laid across the full width of the stock
60 ing has now in the second course been laid from
right to left across the right selvage as shown
at 4. Thread 2 which in the first course was
laid from left to right across the right selvage
has now been laid from right to left the full
65 width of the fabric as shown at 5, and thread
number 3 which in the
left to right across the
laid from right to left
again as shown at 6.
first course was laid from
left selvage has now been
across that same selvage
Thus when this course is
knit a second course has been completed having
the same characteristics as the first, all three
threads having been incorporated.
The laying of the threads for the next course
is illustrated by- diagram C of Fig. 1. In this
75 the first thread is laid back across the right
laid by it. Thread 2 will complete its cycle by 50
in position to begin its next complete cycle by
laying a thread completely across the fabric in
the next course. Thread 3 which, it will be 55
noted, is one step behind thread 2 in the cycle
just as thread 2 was one step behind step I, is
laid in this course from left to right across the
left selvage as shown at 22. Each thread passes
through exactly the same cycle and is knit into 60
each course. All three carriers are working in _
the same direction during each course and are
under control of their friction. There are no
loose threads crossing other courses at the edges
of the fabric although each thread in the body 65
of the fabric is separated from itself by two
others to carry out the “ringless” idea. `A firm,
even, reenforced selvage is formed.
The'fabric I
may be narrowed as desired without interfering
with the method of knitting, the narrowing being
performed in the usual way by the usual attach~
ment.
The structure resulting from this method of
knitting is diagrammatically illustrated by Fig. 3
which shows one selvage and a fragment of the
amaca
body of the fabric and how the three threads
which are numbered i, 2f- and 3 (corresponding
with Fig. 1) are incorporated in succeeding
courses.
Only two threads appear in each course
of the selvage of Fig. 3, the third thread. being
found, of course, in the other selvage which is
not shown in the’figure but which has the same
loop arrangement.
.
.
To make the comparison between this fabric
10 and the conventional `three thread ringless fabric
perfectly plain the conventional fabric is shown
in Fig. 3-A,» in which the loose, or floating
threads. on the selvage or edge of the fabric are
clearly shown at la, 2“, and 3°. Figs. 3 and 3-A
heel having areas of single reenforcement in the
server is viewing the fabric from the rear of the
knitting machine looking towards the front.
That is to say. in the order of knitting, the top
courses shown in these figures precede the lower
courses.
.
.
Fig. 2 illustrates diagrammatically the three
carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 in\ the positions which
they assume for the laying ofv the threads as de
scribed in connection with Fig. 1. Each diagram
25 of Fig. 2 is lettered to correspond with the equiva
lent diagram of Fig.`1. The vertical lines 26. and
21 represent the usual end stops carried by the
narrowing head. At the beginning of the laying
- of the course illustrated by diagram A in Fig. 1
30 the rods are in the position shown in position
A--A, Fig. 2, rods 23 and 25 being at the extreme
left, and rod 24 in the intermediate position which
will bring its carrier over the inner ‘or left edge
of the right selvage. On the nextstroke of the
35 friction rod al1 three rods will- be driven to the
right, as shown in position A of Fig. 2, carrier
rod 23 being driven the full width, carrier rod 24
being driven to its extreme right position which
will bring it across the right selvage, and carrier
40 rod‘25 will be moved from its position on the ex
treme left to the right a distance corresponding to
the width ofthe left selvage. As a result threads
will be laid in this course as shown in diagram A,
45
are constantly under the control of their respec
tive frictions.
10
a In Fig. 4 is illustrated diagrammatically a stock
ing knit as described above, and having the
socalled heel within a heel. That is to say, a
15 are based upon. the assumption that the ob
20
3..
and then another moves across the full Width of
the fabric, and that the motion of the other two
rods is limited to the selvages, one working on one
selvage and the other working on the other. It
will also be noted that at the end of each stroke
each rod is always in the correct position'for the
beginning of its next working stroke so that no
idle courses are required andthat all three rods
Fig. 1.
Upon the next stroke of the friction rod, which
will be to the left, the carrier rods assume the
-positions shown in position B of Fig. 2, rod 23
upper parts of the heel tabs as shown at 28 and 15
29, the remainder of the tabs being overlaid by an
additional reenforcement shown at 30 and 3i.
To form the single reenforcement of the heels be
tween the lines A-A and B-B and also the inter
vening instep portion the same three thread car 20
riers continue to function in the same way, the
single reenforced areas being in effect wider
selvages. For the forming of the double reen
forcement areas 30 and 3| two extra thread car
riers are required or ñve in all, instead of the 25.
usual ’l which would be necessary if orthodox
methods were followed. These extra threads are
laid in the conventional manner back and forth
across the heel tabs by the two extra thread car
riers which are also operated in the conventional 30
manner in Yproperly timed relation to the other
carriers operating upon the tabs., In view of the
fact that the constant demand of the industry is
for more carriers than manufacturers can provide
upon their machines, the release of two carriers
for other uses (which is tantamount to adding two
more carriers to the machine) is of great value
and importance.
When the line B-:B is reached where the
knitting. of the instep portion is suspended, the 40
ringless method above described is discontinued
and the remainder of the double reenforced heel
tabs shown in Fig. 4 between the lines B-B and
C-C are knit in the conventional way, three
thread carriers being employed for each tab.
The knitting of the foot may also be performed
in accordance with the above method and requires
no further description. Obviously the method
being driven to the left a distance corresponding
to the width of the right selvage, rod 24 also to
50 the left the full widthof the fabric, and rod 25_
to the left the width of the left selvage. This will
lay the threads as shown in diagram B of Fig. 1.
On the next stroke of the carrier rods, which
will be to the right, rod 23 will move to the right
single u'nit machine or, for` that matter, manu 50A
ally'. It results in a “ringless” stocking having
'perfect selvages which may be of any width so as
55 across the right selvage, rod 24 will move to the
ing carrier rods and also from floating threads in .
may be carried out upon a legger and a, footer,- a
to be visible or not in the finished stocking, as
desired. The difficulty resulting from free ñoat
right across the left selvage, and the third rod
the selvage is eliminated and perfect fabric is
25 will move to the right all the way across the
assured.
fabric assuming the position shown in position C
of Fig. 2 and laying thread according to diagram
60 C of Fig. 1. Upon the next stroke of the friction
rod which will be to the'leilt,~ as shown in Fig. 2
position D, rod 23 again moves across the full
width of the fabric but to the left inthe opposite
direction to its last full stroke. Rod 24 returns
65 to the left across the left selvage again, and rod
25 moves to the left across the right selvage, the
thread being laid as shown in diagram D.` The
>following movements of the carrier rods shown
in positions E, F and G of Fig. 2 will be under
70 stood without detailed description. They result
'» in the laying of threads in the three following
courses as shown in the similarly numbered dia
gram E,FandGofFig. 1.
v
y It will be noted that during each stroke of the
75 carrier rod operating mechanism ñrst one rod
l
The method of knitting as described above may
be performed, if desired, upon a flat knitting ma
chine of generaliy'standard design, the carrier rod 60
operating mechanism of which is modiñed some
what as diagrammaticaily illustrated in Fig. 5.
Carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 are shown. There are
usually seven carrier rods on a standard flat knit
ting machine. The four otherrods are omitted 65
from the drawings since they are standard in all
respects. and are operated in the conventional
manner through friction rod 36 and frictions oper
.ated by the usual driving mechanism.
The three frictions'3‘i, 38 and 39 which operate 70
carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 are of novel design. In
so far as the friction features of these special
frictions are concerned they are standard and
consequently require no description. All of the
special frictions 31, 38 and 38 are essentially alike 75
2,111,368 `
so that a description of frictionv31 will sufiice for
all three of them. This consists of a friction box
42 equipped with the usual friction device (not
shown) whereby it may be frictionally con
nected with friction rod v36 so as to be propelled
thereby. Upon friction box 442 are pivotally
mounted three fingers 43, 44 and 45, the length of
finger 43 being such that it overlies carrier rod
23. Similarly finger 44 overlies carrier rod 24,
10 and iinge'r 45 overlies carrier rod 25. Behind,
above, and parallel to the friction rod 36 achang
ing shaft 46 is rotatably mounted in suitable
bearings supported by rod 9| parallel thereto.
Shaft 46 is provided with one or more longitudinal
15 spline slots 41 and upon it are three cams 48, 49
and 50.
Each of these cams is slidable upon
change shaft 46 and is provided with a spline key
5| (Fig. 6) engaging with splinegslot 41 so that
although they are slidable on shaft 46 they will,
20 nevertheless, rotate when shaft 46 is turned. _
Friction box 42 is provided with arms 52 and 53
through which changing shaft 46 passes. These
43, 44 and 45 Áoperate to drive them will also be
evident.
»
Friction 38 is, as already stated, substantially
identical to friction 31. It is provided with three
fingers 64, 65 and 66 pivoted upon a friction box
61, the forward ends of the fingers overlying
carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 respectively. The rear
ends of these lingers are equipped with cam roll
ers 68, 69 and 18 which engage with cams 1|, 12
and 13 slidably splined upon shaft 46 so that -10
they will also rotate therewith. As in the case
of friction box 31, friction box 61 is also provided
with arms 14 and 15 enclosing the cams 1l, 12 and
13 to guide these cams and maintain them in
alignment with rollers 68, 69 and 18 whatever
the position or movement of friction 38 may be.
The function of friction 38 is to move one or the
other of carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 across one or
the other of the selvages. Since it is to operate
upon only one rod at a time cams 1|, 12 and 13 20
are so designed and their working surfaces so
positioned that they will maintain two fingers
arms are provided with bosses 54 at the point
out of engagement with their rods while the re
through which the changing shaft 46 passes maining finger is engaged. The carrier rods 23,
which rest against the outer sides of cams 48 24 and 25 are provided with another set of double 25
and 50, to maintain the three cams 48, 49 and 50 stops 11, 18 and 19 respectively, with which ñn
in alignment with the rollers 56, 51 and 58 on the vgers 64, `65 and 66 mayv respectively engage to
rear ends of fingers 43, 44 and 45 respectively, drive the rods. It will, therefore, be evident that
and- to slide the cams on shaft 46 whenever fric
friction box 38 may be used to select and oper
tion box 42 moves, thus maintaining the‘cams in ate any one of the three rods 23, 24 and 25 during 30
alignment with the rollers on the fingers at all' any knitting stroke, the rod selected being gov
times. Arms 52 and 53 also carry a cross rod 55
erned by the arrangement and design of the oper
to which springs are attached which maintain the
ating cams.
fingers in contact with the carrier rods except
when they are removed therefrom by the action
The third friction 39 is also of substantially
identical construction to the other two. It is 35
provided with pivoted fingers 80, 8| and 82 the
of the cams.
This will be described in detail
in connection with another figure.
Also as will be fully described later, Vcams 48,
forward ends of which overlie carrier rods 23, 24
and 25 respectively. The rear ends of the fingers
49 and 50 are so shaped and their respective are also provided with cam rollers 83, 84 and 85
working surfaces so distributed that when the _ engaging with cams 86, 81 and 88 splined on shaft 40
forward end of any one finger is in its lowermost 46 so as to be not only slidable upon but rotatable
or operative position the other two will be rocked therewith. The longitudinal position of these
up into inoperative position. Rods 23, 24 and 25 . cams on change shaft 46 is under the control of
are each provided with a double stop like that friction box 39 through arms 89 and 9U which
shown in Fig. 8 the space between the two stop enclose the cams as described to maintain them 45
surfaces 62 and 63 being sufficient to receive the in alignment with rollers 83, 84 and 85 at all
end of a finger when it is in its down or operative times. Carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 as shown, are
position.
Obviously when in this position any
movement of friction 31 will be translated to a
rod through a finger.
,
The function of friction 31 is to propel the
carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 the full width of the
fabric, the term “full width” as used herein
meaning from one edge to the other whether it
be the maximum width or some lesser width
resulting from narrowing.
More specifically when rod 23 is to travel a
~ distance equivalent to the full width of the fabric
finger 43 will be swung down into engagement
CO with stop 59 so that when friction 31 moves
either to the right or left carrier rod 23 will be
, propelled in one direction or the other the dis
tance permitted by end stops 40*iL and 4| ‘1. These
end stops are the standard stops carried by the
narrowing heads.
Whenever carrier rod 24 is to be propelled the
full width of the stocking, cam 49 will operate in
` La similar manner to permit finger 44 to engage
with a similar double stop 60 on rod 24, and when
carrier rod 25 is to be propelled the full width
of the~ fabric cam 50.wi1l operate to permit finger
45 to engage with a double stop 6| on carrier rod
25. The order in which these rods travel the en
tire width of the fabric has already been de
75 scribed. Therefore. the order in which fingers
provided with a third set of double stops 93, 94
and 95 with which fingers 88, 8| and 82 can en- gage to drive the rods. If desired the same set 50
of stops 11, 18 and 19 with which the fingers oi
friction 38 engage may be utilized for friction 39
provided the length of each of these frictions is
small enough to permit them to be brought close
enough together so that stops 11, 18 and 19 will 55
« register with fingers 88, 8| and 82 on friction 39.
Cams 86, 81 and 88 are also designed and their
working surfaces positioned so‘as to maintain
two of the fingers 80, 8| and 82 out of operative
engagement with their carrier rods and to permit
one of the fingers to operatively engage.
The function of this friction 39 also is to drive
one or the other of carrier rods 23, 24 and 25
across a selvage in one direction or the other.
It will, therefore, now be evident that by means
of the fingers on the three frictions 31, 38 and
39 under the control of the nine associated cams
the three carrier rods 23, 24 and 25 may be in
dependently driven by friction rod 36 simply by
causing 'one of the fingers on friction 31 to en 70
gage one rod, one of the fingers on friction 38
to engage another rod, and one of the fingers on
friction 39 to engage the third rod during each
knitting stroke. However, it is _also evident that
since friction rod 38 during each stroke recipro 75
2,111,262
designed so as to impart the necessary motion to
included to limit the stroke of two rods to theV
the three operating levers to operate the stops as
width of the selvages.
Reference to Fig. 2 will demonstrate that dur
ing each knitting stroke two rods move only the
Width of the selvage whereas the third rod travels
required.
10 the full width of the stocking.
-
To limit the inward travel of the carrier rods
. engaged in laying thel heel tab threads use is
made of the standard pointed heel attachment
with several novel additions thereto. This at
15 tachment, as modified, is shown in the center
of Fig. 5. It consists of a spindle 96 rotatably
mounted in suitable bearings on brackets 91, 98
and 99 fixed to stationary shaft 9|. Spindle 96
is divided into two oppositely threaded halves
20 |00, |0|. Internally threaded stop blocks |02
and |03 are mounted upon halves |00 and |0| re
spectively, of >spindle 96 so that rotation of
spindle 96 will cause blocks |02 and | 03 to ap
proach or recede from one another. To prevent
25 rotation of stop blocks |02 and |03 around
spindle 96 each stop block is also provided with
a boss |03a slidably supported on shaft 9|'.
.
It will be evident that if carrier rods 23, 24 and
25 are provided with stops suitable to engage with
30
stop blocks |02 and |03 the inward travel of
these rods can be limited to less thari' their max
imum'and that this limited travel can be varied
by racking blocks |02 and |03 outwardly or :ln
gage with cams |23, _|24 and |25 respectively. ~
These cams are keyed to‘shaft 46 and they are
Similarly three operating levers |26,
|21 and |28 pivoted at |29 are provided for stops .
|0'|, |08 and |09, the rear ends of which engage
with three cams |30, |3| and |32, also keyed on
shaft 46.
Whenever it is desired to restrictl the movement
of one of the carrier rods to the left the corre
sponding stop on stop block |03 will be pushed
down into engaging position by means of one of
the cams operating through one of the levers. 15
Similarly when the motion of any one of the car
rier rods to the right is to be reduced this is ac
complished through the corresponding stop on
stop block |02 which is pushed down into engag
-ing position by the lever operated by the corre 20
sponding cam. The connection between the stops
|04-|09 and the levers just referred to is neces->
sarily a sliding or otherwise ñexible connection
since the levers do not move longitudinally of the
machine, whereas it must be possible to lrack the 25
stop blocks which carry the stops in and out in
accordance with the requirements of the reen
foroement. As a speciñc illustration of the oper
ation of the machine assume the carrier rods to
be in the position shown in Fig. 5 and position 30
A-A of Fig. 2. yThe first stroke illustrated in
rier rod must not only work upon the selvages
position A of Fig. 2, it will be recalled, was from
left to right and resulted in driving rod 23 the
full width of the fabric. II'his would be done by
finger 43 on friction 31 which would be permitted 35
to engage with stop 59. Simultaneously rod 24
but at every third course must traverse the full
width of the stocking. Therefore, an arrange
will be carried to the right across therlght sel-`
vage by hnger ||| which- is permitted to engage
wardly.
However, it »will -be remembered that
35 throughout the knitting of 'the stocking each car
ment in which stops on the carrier rods must
40 strike stop blocks |02 or |03 on levery stroke will
not be suitable. For this reason stop blocks |02
and |03 are so designed that the stops on carrier
rods 23, 24 and 25 can pass under them.
They
are, however, each equipped with three adjust
45 able stops, those on stop block |02 being num
with stop 24.
Rod 25 will be moved simultane- ~
ously to the right across the left selvage by iinger 40
t6 on friction 38 which is permitted tov engage
stop |19. The inward travel of carrier rod 25 is
arrested when stop | |4 strikes stop |06 on stop
block |02 which will occur when the thread car
away from its associated carrier rod. Carrier rod
rier reaches -the inner edge of the left selvage.
Upon the next stroke of the machine as shown
in position B of Fig. 2 rod 23 is driven to the left
the width of the right selvage. For this purpose
ñnger 30 on friction 39 will be permitted to en
gage with stop 93. When the inner edge of the 50
selvage is reached stop ||| will strike stop |01 _on
stop block |03 and the rod will cometo rest.
23 is provided with additional stops >| |0 and |||
Simultaneously finger 44 on friction 31 has en
bered |04, |05 and |06l respectively, and respec
tively overlying carrier rods 23, 24 and 25. The
stops on block |93 are numbered |01, |03 and |09
respectively, and also respectively overlie carrier
50 rods .23, 2|| and 25. As best shown in Fig. 'l each
of these stops |04-|09 is movable ltoward and
55
with rollers |20, |2| and |22 respectively, may‘en-
cates an unvarying distance -all lthree frictions
and consequently all three carrier rods would
necessarily traverse the entire width of the stock
_ing at each knitting -stroke were not other means
which will engage with stops |04 and |0'| respec
tively, when these last mentioned stops are in
their operative position’.` Carrier rod 24 is sim
ilarly provided with stops | I2 and | |3 engageable
with stops |05 and |08 on stop blocks |02 and
|03 and carrier rod 25 is also similarly provided
60 with stops „||4 and ||5 engageable with stops
|06--|09 on stop blocks |02 -and |03.
Whenever it is desired to limit the inward
travel of any one of the three carrier rods in
either direction this is done 'by moving the
65 proper stops on stop blocks |02 and |03 down into
operative position so as to engagev with one or
another of the stops on the carrier rods. This
gaged with stop 60 on rod 24 and propelled it the
full width of the fabric and linger 66 has engaged 55
with stop '||| on rod 25 to drive it across the left
selvage.
'
l
On the next stroke (position C of Fig. 2) carrier
rod 23 is returned to the right across the right
selvage by finger 80 on friction 39 which engages coA
with stop 93. Carrier rod 24 is moved to the right
across the left selvag'e by finger 65 acting upon
stop 'i 8, theV motion «being terminated at the inner
edge of the left selvage by the engagement of stop' 65
||2 with stop |05 on stop block |02 and carrier
rod 25 has been driven entirely across the fabric
by finger 25 acting upon stop 6|. Upon the next
stroke (position D of Fig. 2) ñnger 43 will again
rier rod operating fingers already described, may drive rod 23 across the fullwidth of the fabric 70
by means of stop 59, ñnger 65 will drive rod 24
be accomplished by the following mechanism.
Stops |04, |05 and |06 are connected to levers ¿across the left selvage by means of stop 18, and
||0, ||'| and ||8 respectively. _ These levers are iinger 82 will drive rod 25 across the right selvage
movement which, of course, must be synchro
nized with the operation of the three sets of car
pivoted on a short shaft ||9 attached to bracket
75 91 so that their rear ends which are provided
by means of stop 95, the travel of rod 25 being '
arrested at the inner edge of the selvage by the 75
6
2,111,262
engagement of stop ||5 with stop |09 on stop
block |03.
Upon the following stroke (position E of Fig. 2)
rod 23 will be driven across the left selvage by
finger 64 acting upon stop 11, its motion being
arrested at the inner edge of the selvage by the
engagement of stop ||0 with stop |04 on stop
block |02, rod 24 will be driven across the entire
width of the fabric by finger 44 through stop 60
10 and rod 25 will be returned across the right sel
vage by finger 82 acting upon stop 95. The next
stroke (position F~of Fig. 2) will return the rods
to their original position (positions A-A of Fig.
2) ñnger 64 engaging with stop 11 to propel rod
15 23, finger 8| engaging with stop 94 to propel rod
24, and finger 45 engaging with stop 6l to propel
rod 25.
Rod 24 is arrested at the inner edge of
the right selvage by stop ||3 which strikes stop
|08 on stop block |03.
20
From this it is evident
that friction 31 acting through fingers 43, 44 and
45 and carrier rod stops 59, 60 and 6| controls the
full width of travel of the carrier rods, that fric
tion 38 acting through fingers 64, 65 and 66 and
carrier stops 11, 18 and 19 controls outward move
25 ment (right to left) of the carrier rods working
upon the left selvage; that this same friction
through the same fingers and stops controls the
movement of the same rods across the same sel
vage in the opposite direction within the limits
30 permitted by stops |04, |05 and |06 on stop block
|02 in conjunction with carrier rod stops | |0, | |2
and ||4; that friction 39 acting through fingers
80, 8| and 82 and stops controls the movement of
the carrier rods working from left to right upon
35 the right selvage and that this same friction 39
acting through the same fingers and carrier rod
stops controls the reverse movement of the rods
across the same selvage to the extent permitted
by stops |01, |08 and |09 on stop block |03 acting
40 upon carrier rod stops |||, ||3 and ||5. It is
also evident that the fifteen cams on changing
shaft 46 can be made to operate the fingers and
center stops to effect the movements described.
It will also be evident that the outer limits of
carrier rod travel are defined by the standard end
stops 40a and 4 l“ so thatthe usual narrowing may
be Veffected and that the width of the reenforced
selvages may be determined and varied at will by
racking stop blocks |02 and |03 inwardly or out
It will also be evident that the operat
ing sequence of the carrier rods may also be mod
ified by altering the cams to correspond. In Fig.
5 a means for rotating changing shaft 46 is shown
50 wardly.
as consisting of a cam |33 upon the main cam
Ul Ul
shaft |34 operating a rock lever |35 through
roller |36. Lever |35 in turn rotates shaft 46 in
a step by step manner through a pawl |31' and
ratchet |38. This form of drive is well known to
those skilled in the art and can be designed by
60 them to impart the required rotation to shaft 46
which will, of course, depend upon the design of
the cams on shaft 46.
Fig. 5 also shows a similar drive for spindle 96.
It consists of a cam |39 on main cam shaft |34, a
65 rock lever |40 operated by cam |39 through roller
modified so that spindle 96 may be automatically
rotated in either direction. Such a drive is well
known to those skilled in the art and for that
reason and to simplify the drawings a hand wheel
|44 is shown by means of which blocks | 02 and
|03 may be racked out.
A clear idea of the construction of the fingers
on frictions 31, 38 and 39 can be obtained from
Fig. 6 which is an end view of friction 31 look
ing to the right from the position indicated by the 10
line 6-6 in Fig. 5. It will be noted that to the
rear end of each finger is attached a spring |45,
the other end of which is attached to cross rod
55. Thus the fingers are maintained in contact
with the carrier rod stops by these springs, the
cams serving to elevate and maintain the fingers
in inoperative position. Whenever it is desired
to throw frictions 31, 38 and 39 out of action,
this may be done by lever |46 by means of which
a rod |41 carried by the friction box can be ro
operation when the point has been reached at
which the'knitting of the instep is suspended, as
diagrammatically indicated at the lines B-B in
Fig.' 4. The completion of the heel tabs from
that point is performed in the conventional man
ner by six carrier rods, three working on each
tab to lay the three threads required for the
doubly reenforced structure. Among these three 35
rods two of the rods heretofore used would nor
mally be employed to continue in the remainder
of each heel tab oneof the threads already in
corporated in the upper part. This is perfectly
feasible since all three rods 23, 24 and 25 have 40
been disconnected from all of the fingers on all
three frictions 31, 38 and 39.
Therefore, for
completing the heel tabs two of the rods, say
23 and 24, may be employed in conjunction with
four other rods, not shown. All of them will be
operated by ordinary frictions with which the
standard friction rod is equipped through suit
ably placed stops on the carrier rods. These, of
course, are also standard. This further em
phasizes the fact that the device of this inven- '
tion is one which in no way alters the other pos
sibilities of the machine.
Fig. 7 shows in greater detail the construction
of the modiñed pointed heel attachment, and
particularly the stops and levers by means of
which the inward travel of the carrier rods work
ing on the selvages are controlled. Stop block
|02 is shown and stop levers |04, |05 and |06 in
their inoperative position into which they are
moved and held by cams |23, |24 and |25 respec 60
tively, against the resistance of a spring |49 of
which there is one for each lever. The upper
end of each stop lever terminates in a slotted
head |50 with the slot of which the proper lever
|4|, a pawl |42 on rock lever |40 and a ratchet
|43 on spindle 96. This mechanism will cause
stop blocks |02 and |03 to move inwardly in a step
||6, ||1 and ||8 slidably engages so that the
stop levers remain operatively connected to the
operating levers in spite of the inward and out
by step manner whenever required.
ward travel of block |02. In order that the cor
rect relation between stop block |02 and cams
'I'his drive
70 which, obviously, will not be used except when the
inner edges of the selvages are to be moved in
wardly may be thrown out of action by lifting
pawl |42 out of engagement with ratchet |43 or in
any other suitable way. To move stop blocks |02
and |03 outwardly the above mechanism may be
20
tated. Rod |41 is provided with cams |48, one
for each ñnger, which, when lever |46 is thrown
back, engage with the fingers to elevate them
into inoperative position and remove them from
the iniiuence of spring |45 and the several cams.
This lever will be employed, for example, to throw
all of the fingers on frictions 31, 38 and 39 out of
|23, |24 and |25 may be positively maintained
boss |0321, which affords a sliding support on
shaft 9|, may also be extended into a half bear
ing |5| resting against changing shaft 46. This
will positively maintain stop block |02 in its 75
.7
annees
lÓ
proper position with respect to the operating
traverse of any one of the carrier rods at a point
cams and the carrier rods.
intermediate its full traverse during the traverse
'
The structure of stop block |03, its stops |01,
lull and ills, associated operating levers, and op
erating cams i3d, lil and i32, is exactly the
stop block adjustable longitudinally of the carrier
rods and provided with stops selectively engage
same as above described. The shapes of the
cams shown in Fig. 7 are clearly illustrated. As
chanically operated means for selecting the stop
already stated, the exact design will readily be
on said st'op block which is to engage with a stop
determined by those skilled in the art and must
be left to them since it depends upon various
factors such as the rate of rotation of changing
shaft ¿lii'as compared with that of the main cam
shaft, the number of teeth in the operating
on a carrier rod to arrest the traverse -of that
ratchet, etc.
15
li claim:
)_
.
1. A fiat knitting machine having a multiplici
ty of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, a
multiplicity of means for reciprocating each of
said rods, and selector means for enabling each
20 of said reciprocating means to engage with a sin
gle and diderent one of said carrier rods.
2. A flat knitting machine according to claim
1 in which the selector means is carried by a ro
tatable shaft.
25
v
of the friction rod, said means consisting of a
able with stops upon said carrier rods, and me
carrier rod at the intermediate point.
10
9. A flat knitting machine having a multiplicity
of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, a mul
tiplicity of carrier rod driving means each en
gageable with a single carrier rod during each
traverse of said carrier- rods, means for engaging
a did'erent one of said driving means with a dif
ferent one of said carrier rods between each
traverse of said rods, andmechanism for operat
ing said engaging means in timed relation tothe
operation of means for arresting the traverse of
one of said carrier rods at a point intermediate
its full traverse, said arresting means consisting
of a pair of stop blocks each provided «witha
series of stops,'one stop of each series being en
3. A fiat knitting machine according to claim l
in which the selector `means is slidably keyed
gageable with a stop on a different one of said 25
carrier rods and a different stop of each series
to a rotatable shaft.
being moved into engaging position in a prede-l
termined sequence between successive traverses
_
,
-
Il. A fiat knitting machine according to claim
l in which the selector means consistsof a multi
30 plicity of cams rotatable in timed relation to the
of the carrierl rods.
’
l0. A fiat knitting machine having a multiplic
ity of carrier rods, a reciprocable friction rod, a
reciprocation of the carrier rods.
5. A nat knitting machine having a multiplici
ty of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, a
friction rod provided with a multiplicity of means
multiplicity of frictions on said friction rod, car
rler rod driving means on each friction engage
able with each carrier rod, and selector means
35 for reciprocating each of said carrier rods. each
for enabling each of said driving means to engage
of said reciprocating means consisting of a> mul-,
tiplicity of fingers, each engageable with a dif
ferent one of said carrier rods, and selector
means associated with each reciprocating means
40 for enabling a iingervof each reciprocating means
with a single and different one of said carrier
`
gers of each reciprocating means out of engage
ll. A flat knitting machine having a multiplic
ity of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, a
multiplicity of means for reciprocating each of 40
said rods, and selector means for enabling each
of said reciprocating means to drive a different
carrier rod at each successive traverse of the
ment Awith the carrier rods.
friction rod.
to engage with a single and diiferent one of said
carrier rods and for maintaining the other hn
45
rods.
30
»
6. A nat knitting machine according to claim
,'
l2. A fiat knitting machine having a multiplic--
l in which the selector means is operated from a
ity of reciprocable carrier rods, a friction rod .
timing mechanism.
provided with a multiplicity of means for recip
rocating each of said rods, selector means for
enabling each of said reciprocating means to
drive a different carrier rod at each traverse oi’ 50
l
7. A fiat knitting machine having a multiplicity
of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, a re
50 ciprocable friction rod provided with a multiplic
ity of means for reciprocating each of said rods,
selector means for enabling each of said recipro
cating means to drive a single and a did‘erent car
rier rod at each traverse of the friction rod, rne
55 chanically operated means for arresting the trav
erse of any one of the carrier rods at a point in- ‘
termediate its full traverse during the traverse of
the friction rod, said means consisting of a stop
block adjustable longitudinally of the carrier rods
60 and provided with stops selectively engageable
with stops upon said carrier rods, and mechani
cally operated means for moving lsaid stops on
said stop block into and out of position ‘to-engage
with the stops upon said carrier rods so that a
65 stop on said stop block engages a stop on a diüer
ent one of-said carrier rods at each stroke of the
friction rod.
l
8. A :dat knitting machine having a multiplicity
of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, a re
70 ciprocable friction rod provided with a multiplic
ity of means for reciprocating each of said rods,
selector means for enabling each of said recipro
eating means to drive a single and a different
carrier rod at each traverse of the friction rod,
75 mechanically operated >means for arresting the
the friction rod, and mechanically-operated.
means for arresting the traverse at any one of the
carrier rods intermediate its full traverse during
the traverse of the friction rod.
i3. A flat knitting machine having a multiplic 55
ity of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, a
reciprocable friction rod provided with a multi
plicity of means for reciprocating each of said
rods, selector means for enabling each of said re
ciprocating means to drive a'single and different 60
carrier rod at each traverse of the friction rod,
means for arresting the traverse of any one of
the carrier rç'ds intermediate its full traverse dur
ing the traverse of the friction rod, said means
consisting of a stop block adjustable longitudi 65
nally of the carrier rods and provided with stops
selectively engageable with stops upon'said car
rier
rods.
’
.
.
i4. A fiat knitting machine having a multiplic
ity of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods, 70
each provided with a thread carrier, a'friction
rod provided with a multiplicity of means for re
ciprocating Í each o1" said carrier rods, selector
means for enabling each of said reciprocating
means to drive a single and different carrier- rod 75
8
2,111,262
at each traverse of the friction rod, means for
arresting the traverse of a predetermined one of
the carrier rods when its carrier has reached the
inner edge of the selvage, and mechanically-op
erated means for operating said arresting means
in timed relation to the operation of the selector
means.
_
15. A flat knitting machine having a. multiplic
ity of longitudinally reciprocable carrier rods each
provided with a thread carrier, a friction rod pro
vided with a multiplicity of means for recipro
eating each of said carrier rods, selector means
for enabling each of said reciprocating means to
drive a single and diiferent carrier rod at each
traverse of the friction rod, means for arresting
the traverse of a predetermined one of thecarrier
rods When its carrier has reached the inner edge
of the selvage, said arresting means consisting
of a stop block adjustable longitudinally of the
carrier rods and provided with stops each selec
tively engageable with stops ona different one of
said carrier rods, and mechanically-operated
means for engaging one of said stops on each said
-stop block with the stop upon the predetermined 10
carrier rod when the thread carrier upon said
predetermined carrier rod has reached the inner
edge of the selvage.
Í_
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