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Патент USA US2111494

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Patented Mar. 15, 1938
_
UNITED STATES
Y
2,111,494
PATENT o1=1=1c1z .
2,111,494
PROCESS OF TREATING WOOD
Charles F. Preston, Sr., Harrison, N. Y., assignor,
by direct and mesne assignments, to Lignose,
Ina, Mamaroneck, N. Y., a corporation of
New York
No Drawing. Application January 24, 1936,
Serial No. 60,710
2 Claims.
The present invention relates to a process of
treating wood, and more particularly to a process
by which various of the so-called soft and rela
tively inexpensive woods, such as pine and other
soft woods, so treated that its surface will be
made to resemble in appearance the harder and
relatively expensive woods, such as mahogany,
walnut, rosewood, teak, and the like.
The object of the invention‘ is to so treat the
10 surface of wood having a natural grain, that the
fats or gums forming the grain will not only be
impregnated with a dye or stain fused therein
but will also be hardened, while at the same time
removing a portion of the treated surface to a
15 greater or less degree during the ?nishing oper
ation, thus producing a ?nished surface in which
the natural grain is emphasized in contrast with
the adjacent surface composed of soft and spongy
?bers, thereby producing a highly ornamental
surface closely imitating the appearance of the
harder and more expensive woods.
.
With the foregoing object in view, my inven
tion may be said to consist of a process of ?nishing
the surface of wood by applying thereto a dye
or stain containing a mild form of acid which
acts upon and softens the exposed surface of the
grain fats or gums and immediately thereafter
subjecting the surface to the action of heat of a
temperature su?icient to dry the surface and to
soften the grain fats and gums and cause the
dye or stain to be absorbed thereby and ?xed
therein in the exposed surface thereof.
In carrying out my invention the dye or stain
or fusing compound will be applied to the surface
to be treated. This dye or stain will preferably
be one containing any usual form of coal tar
coloring such as an aniline dye. Before apply
ing it to the surface of the wood there will be
added thereto a small amount of vinegar or
other form of mild acid, and in some instances a
small amount of sugar. When applied to the
surface of the wood the dye or stain will be
absorbed to a considerable degree, and wherever
the fatty grain gum is exposed it will to a cer
tain extent be softened permitting the dye to be
absorbed thereby. Immediately after applying
the dye or stain compound to the surface to be
treated, it is subjected to heat applied directly
thereto by any suitable heating means as, for
instance, by a torch passed rapidly over the sur
face or closely adjacent thereto. The heat treat
ment should not be continued long enough to
produce a scorching effect, but only to that ex
tent required to dry the surface and to soften
55 the grain fats or gums and blend the coloring
ing tool as, for instance, a wire brush, to remove
a portion thereof, and as the fatty grains and
gums are much harder than the adjacent soft
and spongy ?bers, this abrasive treatment will
effect a polishing of the surface thereof bringing
out the color or tint, producing a contrasting
shade of the natural grain with the adjacent soft
?bers. This abrasive treatment will be continued
until sui?cient of the surface has been removed
to produce the desired color tone and the har 10
monious blending of the darker shades of colorv
in the natural grain with the contrasting lighter
shades in the adjacent softer ?bers.
Thereafter if desired, and to produce a highly
polished. surface, it is subjected to a waxing and 15
polishing brush in the usual manner. The wax
employed may be one having a color blended
therewith, and this waxing and polishing oper
ation may be continued inde?nitely or until the
20
surface has the desired ?nish._
Before subjecting the surface to the waxing and
polishing operation, if a harmonious blending of
tone is desired, such as that known as gray-green
or other blended tone, this may be applied so
that it will be taken up by the soft and spongy 25
?bers adjacent the hard, fatty, grain surface.
It may be pointed out that the heat treatment
immediately following the application of the dye
ing or coloring liquid compound softens the nat
urally fatty gums of the wood and ?xes the color 30
therein by producing a liquid steam action,- and
that after the heat treatment the fatty grains
when dry become much harder which, under the
action of the wire brush and subsequent ?nish
35
ing, present a highly polished surface.
I claim:
'
1. The method of ?nishing the surface of wood
having a natural fatty grain exposed thereon,
which comprises the following: applying a stain
containing a mild acid to the said surface, sub 40
jecting the stained surface to heat of a tempera
ture to soften the exposed fat or gum forming
the natural fatty grain to impregnate and ?x
the stain therein and thereafter abrading the
stained surface to remove a portion of the softer
spongy surface to emphasize the natural fatty
2. The method of
the surface of wood
having a natural fatty grain exposed thereon,
which comprises the following: applying a stain
containing a weak solution of acetic acid to'the
said surface, subjecting the stainedsurface to
therewith. After heating and drying, the grain
heat of a temperature to soften the exposed fat
or gum forming the natural grain to impregnate
and ?x the stain therein and thereafter abrad-.
fats or gums will become relatively hard with
the result that the dye or color is permanently
ing the stained surface to reinove a'portion there
of, and ?nally waxing and polishing the surface.
incorporated therein.
1 next treat the surface with any suitable abrad
CHARLES I". PRESTON, SI.
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