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Патент USA US2111896

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March 22, 1938.
H. s. LION ET AL
2,111,896
CONSTRUCTION oF MILK cRATEs
Filed oet.- 16, 1934
IL
.
INVENTOR.
#Ayom S. L/o/v
7,
ATTORNEYS.
Patented Mar. 22, 1938
guise
‘
PATENT orifice
UNITED STATES
2,111,896
CONSTRUCTION OF MILK ’CBATES
Harold S. Lion and Carlisle G. Rohren Cincin
nati, Ohio, assignors, by mesne assignments,
to The Evans Manufacturing Company, Cin
cinnati, Ohio, _a corporation of Ohio
Application October 16, 1934, Serial No. 748,536
13 Claims. (Cl. 217-69)
Our invention relates to the construction of
milk crates especially, but not exclusively, of the
slatted style, i. e. of the type in which the side and
end walls are made up of wooden rails or slats.
-5 In such crates it has hitherto been suggested to
use inner and outer corner irons between which
the slats or rails are engaged. It has also been
suggested to provide these corner irons with ears
lying between the slats and to fasten the struc
10 ture together with a wire lacing passing through
the slats and through the ears. 'I‘he lacing has
usually been bent over at the bottom, and shoe
members have been provided to cover it.
We shall describe our invention in an exem
15 plary embodiment, from a description of which
it will be understood that the objects of our in
vention are the provision of an improved corner
construction, and a novel way of fastening the
several parts together, which fastening is strong
the shoe member.
Locking means are provided
forrthe rod. A new type of stacking iron is like
wise intended for use with this combination, and
is claimed in a co-pending application entitled
Milk crate corner assemblies, filed of even date 5
herewith.
The general assembly of an exemplary crate is
shown in Figure 1, where the sides are indicated
at I and the ends at 2. Longitudinal bottom
forming rods are shown at 3, and longitudinal l0
and transverse partition forming rods at 4 and 5.
Bottom strut members are shown at 6, and arms
1 connect the partition rods at their crossing
points and have an operative relationship with
the bottom structure. The interior rodded or 16
other construction of the crate, however, has no
necessary bearing upon our invention, and will
not be further described.
Reference to-Figures 2 and 3 will show that the
2o and positive, but easily removed for replacement ‘» sides and ends of our crate are formed of slats Ia
etc. and 2a etc. respectively. Inner and outer
or repair. It is also an object of our invention
to provide a stronger and more serviceable crate. corner irons are shown at 8> and 9. A stacking
These and other objects of our invention which iron is shown at I0. The inner and outer corner
will be set forth hereinafter or will be apparent to iron ymembers are of generally rectangular cross
section, and will be described ín some detail.
25
25 one skilled in the art upon reading these speci
The outer corner iron 9 has portions bent over
lications, we accomplish by that certain construc
tion and arrangement of parts of which we shall at the top as shown at II. Ears I2 are bent up
describe the aforesaid exemplary embodiment, normal to the side walls of the corner iron at in
tervals. These ears are perforated for a pur
reference being had to the accompanying draw
pose hereinafter to be described, and are intended 30
_ 30 ing, wherein:
to cooperate with the ears on the inner corner
Figure 1 is a plan view of a milk crate embody
ing our invention.
A
Figure 2 is an elevational View of a corner
thereof.
35 Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along the
lines 3--3 of Figure 2.
Figure 4 is a perspective view of an outer cor
ner iron.
Figure 5 is a perspective view of an inner cor
40 ner iron.
Figure 6 is a perspective view of a stacking iron.
Figure 7 shows a tool for removing the locking
rods.
'
Figure 7a is an enlarged view of the end of the
45 tool.
.
Briefly in the practice of our invention we pro
vide inner and outer corner irons in a slatted
construction, the corner irons having ears lying
between the slats. The slats and the ears have
50 registering perforations, and fastening means are
provided in the form of a rod which passes
through the registering perforations. The outer
corner iron is turned over to form a shoe mem
ber, and the rod is removable by means of a tool
55 which is insertable through the perforations in
iron to lie above, below and between each pair of
slats or rails in the sides and ends of the box
and to act as spacers therefor. The bottom por
tions of the outer corner iron are bent over to 35
form bottom shoe members I3 and then are con
tinued upwardly to form interspaced members I4
which terminate in perforated, bent over ears I5.
The portions of the side walls of both corner irons
Ybetween the ears are preferably beveled as at I6 40
excepting at the top, as shown.
The inner corner iron is likewise of angular
formation, having top ears I'I, and other ears I8
ìnterspaced therefrom. Whereas in the outer
corner iron the ears are bent over inwardly, in 45
the inner corner iron they are bent over out
wardly, so that when the irons are assembled Y
with the ends of the slats or rails therebetween
the ears and the perforations therein may be
aligned with each other and with perforations in 50
the slats or rails. By reason of the portions I4
of the outer corner iron, the inner corner iron
does not need to be as long.
In one embodiment of our invention, we form
a stacking iron as a separate piece. This is a 55
2
Ul
2,111,896
member of generally angular cross section hav
ing a body (Figure 6) and a stacking extension
2li. This extension is reduced, and offset from
the body, and is of the usual shape to permit its
It will be understood that modifications may
be made in our invention without departing from
engagement within the bottom shoes of an over
lying crate when the crates are stacked. Upper
and lower ears 2l and 22 are struck up outwardly
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters
the spirit thereof.
Having thus described our invention, what we
Patent is:
1. In combination in a crate, a corner rein
from the body of the stacking iron, and are per
forated. They are of a size and shape adapted
to permit their alignment with the ears on the
crate, ears on said member entering in between
said slats, a continuous perforation extending
inner and outer corner irons as clearly shown in
Figures 2 and 3. Both the corner and the stack
continuous perforation extending substantially
ing irons are preferably formed as sheet metal
stampings, galvanized or otherwise protected
15 from corrosion.
In assembling the crate the slats or rails go
between the inner and outer corner irons. The
ends of the upper rails are notched out as at 23 to
bring the top ears of the corner irons substan~
20 tially into the plane of the top of the crate. The
lower rails or slats are also notched out as at 24
to bring the shoe portions I3 of the outer corner
irons to the level of the bottom of the crate, and
further, to accommodate the offset end of a shoe
25 strip 25 which underlies each bottom rail and
which may be riveted thereto, as at 26. The
stacking irons are added to the assembly with
their ears in alignment with -the ears of the outer
and inner corner irons. When the parts have
30 been put together in this way, assemblies of ears
underlie and overlie each rail or slat, and act as
supports and as ultimate spacers therefor. Per
forations in the several metal members and in the
slats or rails are brought into alignment, and the
crate may be fastened together with rod means to
be described hereinafter.
y
The perforations in the top rails or slats are
somewhat larger than the'perforations in the
other rails, and also have still further enlarged
40 portions indicated at 26. Rod members 21, which
are preferably long enough to extend from the
top almost to the bottom of the crate, but are in
no event longer than the crate is high, are pro
vided with heads 28, and crooks or shoulders 29.
These rod members may be driven through the
aligned perforations to complete the crate. When
they are so driven, the crook 29 in the rods com
presses as it passes through the perforation in
the top rails, but expands into the enlargement
50 26 of the perforation locking the rods against dis
lodgment. The rods may otherwise be expanded,
or other suitable locking means provided. The
crate, or any corner portion thereof, however, is
easily disassembled for repair or replacement
55 either of a corner iron, a stacking iron, or the rails
themselves, by merely driving out the rods 21
until the locking means have come above the
upper ears or have otherwise been disengaged.
This is conveniently done by means of a tool such
as that shown in Figure 7, having a handle and
driving head 3U, and a shank 3| of about the same
size as the rod. The upper end of the shank is
preferably hollowed as shown at Sla in Figure
'7a so as to provide a positive engagement with
the end of the rod. 'Ihe shank of this tool is in
serted through the perforations in the shoe mem
bers of the corner irons, and when it contacts the
end of the rod, is tapped with a hammer until the
rod has been driven far enough out to free the
crook therein as aforesaid. After this the rod
may be easily withdrawn by the ñngers for the
remainder of the way. When a new part has re
placed the old, the crate is reassembled by rein
sei'tion of the rod. There will, as shown, be two
of the rods at each corner of the crate.
forcement member, slats forming a wall of said
through said ears and said slats, a rod in said
the full length thereof, and releasable means for
holding said rod in said perforation, said means
comprising a crook in said rod and a cooperating
abutment in said perforation.
2. In combination in a crate, a corner rein
forcement member, slats forming a wall of said
crate, ears on said member entering in between
said slats, a continuous perforation extending 20
through said ears and said slats, a rod in said
continuous perforation extending substantially
the full length thereof, and releasable means for
Vholding said rod in said perforation, said means
comprising a sidewise extending abutment in 25
said rod and a cooperating abutment in said per
foration.
3. An outer corner iron for slatted crates con
sisting of an angular body, ears at intervals there
along at both edges to lie between adjacent slats,
and bottomv portions of said iron bent over to
act as shoes, said ears and shoes being perforated,
said bottom portions being continued up inside
said body for at least the width of one slat and _l
interspaced from said body the thickness of the
end of a slat.
4. An outer corner iron for slatted crates consisting of an angular body, ears at intervals there
along at both edges to lie between adjacent slats,
>and bottom portions of said iron bent over to act 40
as shoes, said ears and shoes being perforated,
said bottom portions being continued up inside
said body for at least the width of one slat and
interspaced from said body the thickness of the
end of a slat, and inwardly extending ears on the
said continuations of said body, said ears having
perforations in alignment with said first men
tioned perforations.
5. In combination in a slatted crate, a corner
reinforcement member of angular shape having v50
ears adapted to lie between the slats, bottom
portions of said member being bent over inwardly
so as to enclose the ends of the bottom slats, at
least, upon three sides, slats forming a side and
end wall of a crate, continuous perforations ex
tending through said ears, said slats and said
bottom portions, and fastening means in said con
tinuous perforations extending substantially the
full length thereof.
6. In combination in a slatted crate, a cornery 60
reinforcement member of angular shape having
ears adapted to lie between the slats, bottom por
tions of said member being bent over inwardly so
as to enclose the ends of the bottom slats, at least, _,
upon three sides, slats forming a side and end‘
wall of a crate, continuous perforations extending
through said ears, said slats and said bottom por
tions, rods in said continuous perforations ex
tending substantially the full length thereof, and
releasable means for holding said rods in said 70
perforations.
'7. In combination in a slatted crate, a corner
reinforcement member of angular shape having
ears adapted to lie between the slats, bottom por
tions of said member being bent over inwardly so
3
2,111,896
as to enclose the ends of the bottom slats, at least,
upon three sides, slats forming a side and end
wall of a crate, continuous perforations extend
ing through said ears, said slats and said bottom
portions, and rods in said continuous perforations
and bottom thereof confining the assembledì slats
therebetween, said slats and ears having aligned
extending substantially the full length thereof,
openings therethrough for receiving a readily re
leasable securing rod thereon.
said means comprising sidewise extending abut
ments in said rods and cooperating abutments in
11. In combination in a crate comprising super
said perforations.
'
8. In combination in a slatted crate, inner and
outer cornerV irons having cooperating pairs of
ears adapted to lie between the slats, slats form
ing side and end walls of a crate, continuous per
forations extending through said slats and ears,
and stiff rods in said continuous perforations ex
15 tending nearly but not entirely the full length
thereof, and means for holding said parts in as
sembled relation, said , means comprising side
wise extending abutments in said rods and co
20
imposed slats forming the Walls of said crate, a
corner angle iron having ears located at the top
operating abutments in said perforations.
9. In combination in a crate, a corner angle
iron, slats formed a Wall of said crate, ears on
said angle iron entering between said slats,
aligned perforations forming a continuous hole
extending through the entire length of said ears
and said slats, a rod in said hole of' a length suf
ñcient to hold the parts in assembled relation,
readily releasable securing means for holdin-g the
parts together, said means comprising retaining
means within the limits of said hole cooperating
30 with engaging means on said rod.
10. In combination in a crate comprising super
Ul
imposed slats forming the Walls of said crate, a
corner angle iron having ears located at the top
and bottom thereof confining the assembled
10
slats therebetween, and having other ears enter
ing in between said slats, said slats and ears hav
ing aligned openings therethrough for receiving
a readily releasable securing rod therein.
12. In combination a crate comprising super
imposed slats forming the walls of said crate, a
corner angle iron having ears located at the bot
tom thereof conñning the assembled slats there
above, said slats and ears having aligned open
ings therethrough for receiving a readily re
leasable headed securing rod therein.
13. In combination a crate comprising super
imposed slats forming the walls of said crate, a
corner angle iron having ears located at the bot
tom thereof conñning the assembled slats there
above and other ears entering in between said
slats, said slats and ears having aligned open
ings therethrough for receiving - a readily re
leasable headed securing rod therein.
HAROLD S. LION.
CARLISLE G. ROHRER.
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