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Mmh 22,1938.‘
D. w. MCL‘ENEGAN
'
_
2,112,038‘
AIR CONDIT IONING SYSTEM
, ~
Filed May 5, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
Fig.’ l.
32
Ihve‘nto'r'z"
David ‘ml. Mc Lehegan,~’
His Attorney
March 22, 1938.
7
D. w. MOLENEGAN
AIR
CONDITIONING
SYSTEM
Filed May 5, 1936
2,112,038
7
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
Inventor: '
David \A/. Me Lenegan,
b g j??/MZ is£ Attorngg.
2,112,038
Patented Mar. 22, v.1938’
UNITED STATES PATENT OFF-ICE.
». CONDITIONING sys'rEM
David W. McLenegan, Caldwell, N. .l., assignor to
General Electric Company, a corporation of
‘ New York
‘ Application my 5, 1936, Serial No. we
9 1
r 1 III‘ 5.
, (cite-s)
My invention relates to air conditioning sys
tems for cooling and dehumidifying the air within
auditoriums, rooms and other enclosures.
It is an object of my invention to provide a
acrossthe casing in the path of the air. Coil
I8 is preferably of the type having a plurality of
?ns for providing a large heat absorbing area.
The coil I t is connected in the circuit of a me
5 system for cooling and dehumidifying the airy chanical refrigerating machine including ‘a com- 5
within an enclosure including a cooling coil and
an. improved arrangement for readily changing
the supply'of cooling medium to vary the effec
tive cooling surface of the coil in accordance with
10 the temperature and humidity conditions of the
air in the enclosure.
_
.
Another object of my invention is to provide a
system for cooling and dehumidifying the air
within an enclosure including a cooling coil and
.15‘ having a thermostatically operated valve for con
trolling the admission of refrigerant to the cool
ing coil and an arrangement‘for varying the am
bient surrounding the control bulb of the valve
to vary the length of the portion of the coil con
20 taining superheated refrigerant'vap'or.
_
Further objects and advantages of my inven
tion will become apparent'as the following de-_
scription proceeds and the features of novelty
which characterize my invention will be pointed
25 out with particularity in they claims annexed to
and forming a part of this speci?cation.
For a better understanding of my invention,
reference may be had to the accompanying draw
ings in which Fig. l is a diagrammatic illustra
30 tion of an air conditioning system embodying my
invention; Fig. 2 is an enlarged detail view of the
thermostatic bulb and heating coil therefor shown
in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the line‘
3--3 of Fig. 2; and Fig. 4 isle. sectional view of a
35 ‘modified form of the bulb and heater, shown in
., Fig. 2.
'
'
Referring now to the drawings, in Fig. 1 I have
shown an air conditioning system comprising a
I casing I0 arranged to receive fresh air through
40 a duct I I and air from the room to be conditioned
' through a duct I2 which passes through a wall
I3 of the room. The fresh air’ and the room' air
are mixed in the casing I0 and aredrawn there
through by operation of a fan I4 arranged at the
pressor I9 driven by a motor 20, a condenser 2i
and a liquid receiver 22. Gaseous refrigerant is
compressed in the compressor It and is dis
charged into the condenser M where it is cooled
and lique?ed by air circulated thereover by a~10
fan 2t driven by a motor 2t connected across the
motor W. The condensed refrigerant collects in
the liquid receiver 22 and is supplied to thecoil
It by operation of an expansion valve 25. The
refrigerant is preferably admitted to the coil it 15
so that it ?owsvthrough the banks Ita, IBD, and
I 80 of the coil in succession in the opposite di- '
rection from that of the flow of air through ‘the
duct ‘It. The air thus passes from the least cold
' to the coldest portion of the coil.
Refrigerant 20
vapor ‘is withdrawn from the coil 58 through a
conduit 21 and is returned to the compressor It;
The valve 25 is of the well known thermostati
cally operated type and is provided with a ther
mostatic element such as a bulb containing a 25
volatile liquid and mounted in heat exchange re
lation with the suction side of the coil I8. The ‘
bulb is ‘connected with a valve operating bellows
in the valve casing through a tube 26, in order to
control the admission of refrigerant to the coil 30 '
w, in response tothe temperatureof the gaseous
refrigerant withdrawn from the coil.
The refrigerating machine is controlled by a
thermostat 28 having a relay 28a and being re
sponsive to the temperature of the air in the 35
room and bya humidostat 29 having a relay 29a
and being responsive to the relative humidity of
the air in. the room. The thermostat 28 is ar
ranged to control a switch 80 in the power supply
line of the motor‘ 20. Should the humidity of 40
the air in the room he abnormally high the tem
perature of the air in the room may be reduced
sufficiently to satisfy the thermostat 28 before
the humidity has been reduced the desired amount
to provide maximum comfort for the occupants 45
45 discharge side of ‘the casing. The amounts of
fresh air and room air admitted to the casing of the‘room. In such cases it is desirable further
are determined by adjustable dampers Ila and to dehumidify the air, but 'any substantial de
_ I2a, respectively. The conditioned air is retumed crease of the temperatureof the air in the room
to the room through a duct I5 passing through
50 the wall I3. A ?lter I6 is provided In the casing
to remove dust and other impurities from the
air, and the air is cooled by passing through a
' cooling element I'I arranged in the casing and
comprising a sinuous coil 18 having a plurality of
55 turns arranged in three banks extending entirely
must be avoided in order to maintain a comfort
able temperature ior the occupants of the room. 50
However, it may be permissible to continue the
cooling action at a reduced rate in order that the
humidity may be further reduced.‘
,
In most air conditioned spaces some of the heat
winch must be removed by the air conditioning '55
, 2
aiiaose
system originates within the room itself. For
example, occupants, electric lights, motors and
ture (M of the relay 28a, raising arms ‘15 and
M of the relay into engagement with contacts
other heat producing appliances and also the ‘ ill and ‘it, respectively, and breaking engagement
between the arm 49 and a contact £9. The rais
5 erate heat within the room. It is necessary that ing of arm 46 closes a holding circuit for the
sun's rays entering through the windows, all gen
the heat from such internal sources be removed coil ill through connections 50 and ‘iii, thereby
from the room before any reduction of the tem ‘ maintaining the coil energized even though the
perature in the room below that of the outdoor air strip 37 should move out of engagement with
can be accomplished. It is evident, therefore, the contact 38. The raising of the arm ‘‘55 closes
10 that part of the capacity of the cooling system a circuit of a coil 52 of the switch 39 from line 10
must be devoted to the removal of heat from these 32 through a connection 53, arm 135, a line H to
internal sources. 'In air conditioning systems in
which the internal heat of the space to be con
ditioned must be removed a small portion of cooled
the coil and thence back to line 33 through a
connection 55. The energization of coil 52 picks
up an armature 56 of switch 30 thereby closing
15 air may be circulated continuously without re
the switch and connecting motor leads 5‘! and
59 to lines 32 and 33, respectively. The motor
is thus energized to operate the compressor l9
systems to produce a substantial amount of de- ' and supply refrigerant to the coil Ill. The opera
tion of the motor will continue until a predeter
humidi?cation with only su?icient/sensible cool
ing to offset the effect of the internal heat sources mined low temperature of the air in the room
has been reached when the bimetallic strip 9'!
in the room so that dehumidi?cation may be ac
complished without reduction of the dry bulb will engage a contact 59. This short-circuits the
temperature of the air in the room.
relay coil M through connections 42 and till,
If the thermostat 28 is satis?ed due to the strip 91 and connection 40, thereby deenergiz
reduction of the temperature of the air of the ing the coil and causing relay 28a to drop out
room to a predetermined low value before the and break the circuit of coil 52 to open switch
The motor 2|] is thereby deenergized and
humidity has been reduced to satisfy the humid‘
the supply of refrigerant to the coil Ill discon
ostat 29, the humidostat will take over the con
trol of the motor 20 and continue the operation tinued.
When the air conditioning system is operat 30
of the motor until the humidostat is satisfied or
until ‘a minimum allowable temperature of the ing as just described the valve 25 is set to main
air in the room has been reached as determined tain a minimum temperature of the refrigerant
by a low temperature limit thermostat 9i. When withdrawn from the coil l8. In other words, a
the motor is under the control of the humidostat minimum length of the coil is maintained ?lled
the supply of refrigerant to the coil is reduced with superheated refrigerant vapor while the 35
and consequently, an increased percentage of the major portion of the coil contains saturated
vapor and liquid refrigerant and is effective for
total coil length is ?lled with superheated re
dehumidifying the air passing over the coil and
frigerant gas. With the ?ow of' refrigerant re
for substantially reducing the sensible heat of
stricted the balance of heat transfer capacity be
ducing the total sensible heat of the air in the
space to be conditioned. It is possible in such
20
25
30
35
40 tween the coil and the compressor is changed so
that a lower refrigerant pressure is maintained
in the coil. At this lower pressure the saturation
temperature of the refrigerant is lower and the
surface temperature of the coil is, therefore, low
er in that portion of the coil’ in which the gas is
not superheated. The dehumidi?cation-accom
plished by this cold portion of the coil is [in
creased as compared with the dehumidi?cation
during the normal operation of that portion but
50 the total sensible heat removed from the air by
the coil is reduced.
The above described arrangement“ for effect
ing a control of temperature and humidity by
modifying the operation of the refrigerant supply
controlling device in accordance with the hu
the air inthe roomi
_
It has been pointed out above that by operat—
ing only a portion of the cooling coil at low
temperature, while the remaining portion con
tains superheated refrigerant vapor, the humidi
ty may be decreased‘ without substantially de
creasing the sensible heat of the air in the room.
This further reduction of humidity is accom
plished, as has already been stated, by arrang
ing the room humidostat so that it will take over
operation of the refrigerating machine in the
event that the humidity is still too high after
the room thermostat is- satisfied. I, therefore,
provide a small heating coil adjacent the ther
mostatic element or bulb of valve 25 in order
to vary the temperature of the bulb and. modify 55
its control effect. Under normal operating con
ditions in response to the room thermostat this
heater is maintained energized so that only a
application Serial No. 77,949, ?led May 5, 1936, relatively small amount of heat need be sup
and assigned to the General Electric Company, ‘ plied to the bulb from the refrigerant withdrawn 60
from the coil It in order to open the valve 25
assignee of my present invention;
and admit refrigerant to the coil. The coil is
When it is desired to operate the air condi
thereby maintained with a minimum length
tioning system illustrated in Fig. 1, electric en
thereof containing superheated refrigerant vapor.
ergy is supplied to lines 32 and 33. This ener
midity of the air in an enclosure is not'my in
vention, but is the invention of Edward W. Roess
ler, and is described and claimed in his copending
6
40
gizes a transformer 34 having a primary wind
ing 35 and a secondary winding 36. If the tem
perature of the air in the room rises to a pre
determined value a bimetallic strip 31 of the
An arrangement of a refrigerator evaporator
with a control having a heating element asso
ciated with the temperature responsive member
thereof to provide a plurality of voperating tem
thermostat 28 engages a contact 38 and closes a ' peratures of the evaporator is not my invention,
circuit from one side of the secondary 36 through
7 O a connection 39, the strip 31 and a connection but is the invention of Ernest Zurcher and is de
scribed and claimed in his Patent No. 2,060,777,
49 td a coil M of relay 28a and thence back to dated Nov. 10, 1936, and assigned to the General
the other side of the secondary 36 through a \Electric Company, the assignee of this present
.
connection 42 and a line 43. The coil 4! will application.
» When the control of the refrigerating system
75 thereby be energized and will pick up an arma
_
' 2,112,038
is taken over by the humidostat the heating coil
v3
connection 18, the member 13, a contact ‘I1 and
a bimetallic strip 18 of thermostat 3|, and a con
nection ‘l8to a coil 88 of relay 29a and back to
must be received from the refrigerant withdrawn the other side of the ‘secondary 88 through the
from the coil I8. The vapor withdrawn from the line 43. This energizes the coil 88, raises an
coil l8 must now attain a higher temperature armature 8| of the relay 28a and lifts the arm 65
before the expansion valve willoperate to admit v and an arm 82, thereby breaking'the circuit of '
refrigerant to the coil and obviously a greater . the heating coil 88 and closing a holding circuit .
length of the coil willbmmaintained filled with for the coil 88 from line .15 through arm 82 and
a connection 88 to maintain the relay 28a in its 10
10 superheated vapor and a relatively small portion
of the coil willbe‘utilized at a low temperature raised position even though the movable member
‘I3 moves out of engagement with the contact 14.
to dehumidify the circulated air. . _
- is deenergized and all the heat applied to the
_ control bulb necessary to operate the valve 25
Referring again to Fig.- 1, terminals GI and 82,
of a heating coil arranged in a cover 68 about the
- bulb of the expansion valve. 5 are connected in
a circuit ‘including a varia le resistor 84, an
arm 85 of relay 28a andthe arm 48 of relay 2811.
.In its raised position the arm 85 engages a con-_
tact 84 closing a circuit from line _32 through a
connection 85, arm 65, a connection 88 and line
54 to coil 52 and thence to line 33 through the
.connection 55 thereby energizing coil 52 and
This ‘circuit is closed whenever relay 28a is e‘ner"-'.: operating switch 38 tov continue operation of‘
g'ized by the room thermostat to raise the arm the motor 28 of the refrigerating machine and
supply refrigerant to the coil l8. Since ‘the heat 20
20 45. It is, therefore, energized whenever the con
ing wire 88 is now deenergized a greater amount
trol vof the refrigerating machine is taken over by
Whenever the arm 85 is of heat must be received by the bulb 88 from
raised“in response to operation of the roomv the vapor withdrawn froml'the coil l8 in order to '
‘
the room thermostat.
humidostat 28 the heating coil is deenergized and,
actuate the valve 25 and, consequently, the
25 therefore,‘ a minimum length of the cooling. coil
‘ is utilized for dehumidifying whenever the re
vapor in a greater portion of the coil i8 is main
tained superheated, and a smaller p'ortion of the
coil is available for operation at a low tempera
frigerating machine is operated in response to the
humidostat. Thelength of the portion of the coil
l8 which is maintained filled with superheated
30
ture to'dehumidify the air passing through the
casing l8.
Since a larger portion of the coil is '
refrigerant vapor during normal operation of the maintained ?lled with superheated refrigerant 30
refrigerating machine may be varied-by adjust - vapor the temperature of the air passing through
ing the ‘rheostat- 84 so that if desired the normal > the casing i8 will'not be decreased as much as
during normal operation of the system. How
rate’ of cooling may be varied thereby.
In. Figs. 2 and ,3, I have indicated at 86 the ever, since a portion of the coil is still maintained
-35 ‘bulb of the thermostatic expansion valve 25. at a low temperature some moisture will be ab—
stracted from the air and-the air will be further
This bulb is secured in good heat exchange re
-latinship to .the suction side of the coil in ‘any ' dehumidi?ed, without substantial decrease in the
‘suitable manner, such as by soldering as indi
cated at“. The heater previously referred to
40 comprises an insulated heating wire "secured
closely about the bulb 88 by spring clips 88. Ends
.18 and ‘ii of the heater 88 are secured to the ter
minals 6| and 62 in any suitable manner, and the
cover‘ 88 which comprisesa block of insulating
45 material completely surrounding the bulb 88 and
- adjacent portions of the cooling coil l8 holds the
heating wire 88 in ,contact with the bulb 88.
Whenever the circuit of the heating wire’ 88 ‘is
closed and the wire heated the temperature of
the" bulb 86 is raised and a certain amount of
liquid is vaporized therein, thereby changing, the
pressure in the bellows of the expansion valve;
when the circuit is opened the bulb 88 quickly
cools down to‘ the temperature of the coil i 8 ad
jacent
thereto. Should it be desired to delay the
55
heating effect of the wire 88 after the wire is
energized a body of metal may be provided be
tween the wire and the bulb which will have a
heat storage effect. In Fig. '4 I have shown the
thermostatic bulb 68 provided with a body of
metal ‘i8 secured to the 'bulb' between the bulb and
the heater 88, in order to obtain this “flywheel?
' -_or heat‘ storage effect.
sensible heat of the air in the room.
_
The operation of the refrigerating machine
under control of the humidostat will "continue 40
until the humidity has been reduced to a desired
amount or until the temperature of the air has
reached a minimum permissible value consistent
with comfort. Should the humidostat be satis?ed
the movable member 13 will engage‘ a contact 81 45
thereby short-circuiting the coil 88 through con
nection ‘I9, strip ‘I8, movable member ‘l8 and a
portion‘ of line 88, thereby causing relay 29a to
drop- out and discontinue operation of the motor
28 by deenergizing coil 52 and opening switch 88. 50
Should the temperature of the air in the room
reach the minimum permissible temperature be- -
fore the humidostat 28 is satis?ed the strip 18
will engage a contact 88 and short-circuit the >
coil 88 through connection ‘i8, strip 18 and a 1
connection 88, thereby deenergizing the relay 29a
and stopping the operation of the refrigerating
machine. Should the temperature of the room
for some reason increase until the thermostat 28
calls for cooling, 'the control of the refrigerating 60
machine will be transferred from the humidostat
88 to the thermostat 28, since the operation of
the thermostat will raise the arm 88 of the relay
During the operation of the air conditioning _ 88a thereby breaking the circuit to humidostat
88 eausing the relay 28a to drop out and there
65 system shown, should the humidity of the room by
again energizing the heating coil 88 through
still be above the desired value after the thermo
stat 88 has been satis?ed, the humidostat 88 will ' the arm 88. ,Thecontrol of the system in re-'
be in position to control the motor and the relay sponse to thebroom thermostat, therefore, takes
28a. will operate to deenergize the heating wire precedence over the control in response to the »
70
70 88 and to continue the operation of the refriger
It will be apparent from the foregoing that I
ating machine. ‘When the humidity is too high
have provided an air conditioning system for‘
a movable member 18 of humidostat 88 is in en
gagement with a contact ‘I8 establishing a circuit. regulating, both the temperature and humidity
humidostat.
from one side of the secondary ‘88, through-the
connection 8i, arm 88 of relay Maya line ‘l5; a
’
»
r
.
-
_
-
of the air within an enclosure and’including a/
simple and ‘ improved arrangement/for varying 78
b
d
2,112,038
the e?'ective cooling surface of the refrigerat
ing coil.
While I have disclosed a particular embodiment
of my invention, various modi?cations will occur
to those skilled in the art and I do not, there
fore, desire my invention to be limited to the
construction shown and described and I intend
in the appended claims to cover all modi?cations
thereof which do not depart from the spirit and
scope of my invention.
What I claim as new‘ and desire to secure by
Letters Patent of the United States, is:
l. A system for conditioning the air within
an enclosure including a cooling element, means
for supplying cooling medium to said element
and for withdrawing cooling medium from said
element, a valve for controlling the supply of
eration of said temperature responsive means to
maintain superheated a predetermined different
length of said coil.
4; A system for conditioning the air within an
enclosure including a cooling coil, means for sup
plying liquid refrigerant to said coil and for
withdrawing vaporized refrigerant from‘ said coil,
a valve for controlling the supply of liquid re
frigerant to said coil, means responsive to the
temperature of the vaporized refrigerant with 10
drawn from said coil for actuating said valve to
maintain superheated'the vaporized refrigerant
in a predetermined length of said coil, said tem
perature responsive means including a tempera
ture responsive element secured in heat exchange 15
relationship with the outlet side of said coil sub
ject‘to the temperature of the vaporized refrig
cooling medium to said element, means respon
erant withdrawn from said coil, means including
sive to the temperature of the cooling medium
withdrawn from said element for actuating said
valve to maintain a predetermined substantially
constant temperature of the cooling medium with
drawn from said element, said temperature re
a heating element for determining the tempera
sponsive means including a temperature respon
sive element arranged in heat exchange relation
ship with the outlet side of said cooling element
subject to the temperature of the cooling medium
withdrawn from‘ said cooling element, and means
responsive to a condition of the air within said
enclosure and arranged to vary the temperature
of said temperature responsive element for modi
fying the operation of said temperature respon
sive means to maintain a predetermined di?er
ent substantially constant temperature of the
cooling medium withdrawn from said element.
2. A system for conditioning the air within an
enclosure including a cooling coil, means for sup
plying liquid refrigerant to said coil and for with
drawing vaporized refrigerant from said coil, a
40 valve for controlling the supply of liquid refrig
erant to said coil, means responsive to ‘the tem
perature of the vaporized refrigerant withdrawn
from said coil and actuating said valve for main
taining superheated the vaporized refrigerant in
a predetermined length of said coil, said temper
ature responsive means including a temperature
responsive element secured in heat exchange re
lationship with the outlet side of said coil and
subject to the temperature of the vaporized re
frigerant withdrawn from said coil, and means
responsive to the humidity of the air within
said enclosure and arranged to vary the temper
ature of said temperature responsive element for
,modifying the operation of said temperature re
ture of said temperature responsive element, 20
means for energizing said heating element, and
means responsive to the humidity of the air
within said enclosure and arranged to vary the
energization of said heating element for modi
fying the operation of said temperature respon 25
sive means to maintain superheated the vaporized
refrigerant in a different predetermined length
of said coil“
5. A system for conditioning the air within
an enclosure including a cooling coil, means for
supplying liquid refrigerant to said coil‘ and for
withdrawing vaporized refrigerant from said coil,
a valve for controlling the supply of liquid re
frigerant to said coil, means responsive to the
temperature of the vaporized refrigerant with
drawn from said coil and actuating said valve
for maintaining superheated the vaporized re
frigerant in a predetermined length of said coil,
said temperature responsive means including a
bulb containing a volatile liquid and secured in 40
heat exchange relationship with the outlet side
of said coil subject to the temperature of they
vaporized refrigerant withdrawn from said coil,
means including a heating element for deter
mining the temperature of said bulb, means for
energizing said heating element, and means re
sponsive to the humidity of the air within said
enclosure and arranged to vary the energization
of said heating element for modifying the op
eration of said temperature responsive means to
maintain superheated a different length of said
coil.
6. A system for cooling the air within an en
closure including a cooling element, means for
sponsive means to maintain superheated the supplying liquid refrigerant to said element and
for withdrawing vaporized refrigerant from said
vaporized refrigerant in a different predeter
' element, means including a valve for controlling
mined length of said 0011.
3. A system for conditioning the air within the supply of liquid refrigerant to said element,
an enclosure including a cooling coil, means for
means including a thermostatic element respon
supplying liquid refrigerant to said coil and for
withdrawing vaporized refrigerant from said coil,
a valve for controlling the supply of liquid re
frigerant to said coil, means responsive to the
sive to the temperature of the vaporized refrig 60
erant withdrawn from said cooling element for
temperature of the vaporized refrigerant with
drawn from said coil and actuating said valve
actuating said valve to maintain a predeter
mined substantially constant temperature of the
vaporized refrigerant withdrawn from said cool
ing element, means including a heating element
for maintaining superheated the vaporized re
arranged adjacent said ‘thermostatic element
frigerant in a predetermined length of said coil, and modifying the operation of said temperature
said temperature responsive means including a responsive means for maintaining a predeter
bulb containing volatile liquid and secured in mined di?erent substantially constant tempera
heat exchange relationship with the outlet side I ture of the vaporized refrigerant withdrawn from
of said coil subject to the temperature of the said cooling element, and means for selectively 70
vaporized refrigerant withdrawn from said coil,
and means responsive to the humidity of the air
Within said enclosure and arranged to vary the
75 temperature of'said. bulb for modifying the op
’
I
controlling said last two means.
'
'1. A system for cooling the air within an en
closure including'a cooling element, means for
supplying liquid refrigerant to said element and 75
for withdrawing vaporized refrigerant from said _ temperature responsive means for maintaining
element, means including a valve for controlling
the supply of liquid refrigerant to said element,
L1.
10
means including a thermostatic element respon
sive to the temperature of the vaporized refrig
erant withdrawn from said cooling element for
actuating said valve to maintain a, predetermined
substantially constant temperature of the va
porized refrigerant withdrawn from said cool
ing element, means including a heating ele
ment arranged adjacent said thermostatic ele
ment and modifying the operation of said tem—
perature responsive means for maintaining a
predetermined different‘ substantially constant
temperature of the vaporized refrigerant with
drawn from said cooling element, a body of heat
insulating material arranged about said heating
element and said thermostatic element, and
means for selectively controlling said last we"
means.
,
v
.
.
8. A system for cooling the air within an
enclosure including a ‘cooling element, means
for supplying liquid refrigerant to said element
and for withdrawing vaporized refrigerant from
said element, means including a valve for con
trolling the supply of liquid refrigerant to said
element, means including a thermostatic element
a predetermined diderent substantially constant
temperature of the vaporized refrigerant with
drawn from said cooling element, and means in
cluding a body of heat conducting material arL
ranged between said thermostatic element and
said heating element for delaying the e?ect of
a change of energization of said heating element.
‘9. A system for cooling the air within an en
closure including a cooling element, means for 10
supplying liquid refrigerant to said element and
for withdrawing vaporized refrigerant from said
element, means including a valve for controlling
the supply of liquid refrigerant to said element,
means including a thermostatic element respone
sive to the temperature of the vaporized refrig
“erant withdrawn from said cooling element for
actuating said valve to maintain a predetermined
substantially constant temperature of the vapor
ized refrigerant withdrawn from said cooling 20
element, means including a heating element for
supplying heat to said thermostatic element,
means varying the energization of said heating
element and modifying the operation of said
temperature responsive means for maintaining
a predetermined di?erent substantially constant
temperature‘ ofthe vaporized refrigerant with
drawn from said cooling element, means includ
ing a ‘body of heat conducting material arranged
between said thermostatic element and said 30
for actuating said valve to maintain a predeter
mined substantially constant temperature of the heating element for delaying the e?ect of a
vaporized refrigerant withdrawn from said ele- ' change of energization of said heating element.
ment,‘ means including a heating element for and a ‘body of heat insulating material arranged
responsive to the temperature of the vaporized
refrigerant withdrawn from said cooling element
supplying heat to said thermostatic element,_ about said heating element and said thermostatic
35 means varying the energization of‘ said heating
element and modifying the operation ‘oi said
element.
a
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