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Патент USA US2112482

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March 29, 1938.
w. P. cRlsMAN
STORAGE CABINET FOR ICE
2,112,482
'R
`Filed Aug. 16, 19.37
2 Sheets-Sheet l
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v March 29, 1938.
2,112,482
w. P. cRlsMAN
STORAGE CABINET FOR ICE CREAM AND THE LIKE
Filed Aug. 16, 1937
2 Shee'tS-Shee‘b 2
Patented Mar. 29, 1938
2,112,482 I
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,112,482
'
STORAGEy CABINET FOR ICE CREAM AND
THE LIKE
William P. Crisman, Takoma Park, Md., assigner
to Southern Dairies, Inc., Washington, D. C.,
a corporation of Delaware
Application August 16, 1937, serial No. 159,384
13 Claims. (c1. «s2-e9)
This' invention relates to cold storage cabinets
and more particularly to those types of cabinets
which are used for ice cream service in retail
stores.
5
ì
In my copending application Serial No. 131,077
I have described and claimed a cabinet of the
two-high receptacle type in which is incorporated
means for supporting the receptacles of the upper
tier and facilitating access to the receptacles of
l0 the lower tier. As explained in thatapplication,
ice cream and the like is kept in bulk in such
cabinets, under refrigeration, and the cream is
dipped from cans or other receptacles'- as cus
tomers call for it. Until comparatively recently,
it was customary to stock the cabinets with ice
cream in five-gallon cans, but the best present
practice substitutes two-and-one-half gallon
cans to provide a Wider range of available flavors
andl kinds of ice cream and analogous goods and
to permit emptying and replenishment of the
cans at shorter intervals so that the stock on hand
is always comparatively new and fresh.
The two-and-one-half-gallon cans are com
monly of the same diameter and of approxi
mately one-half the height of the five-gallon
cans.
to a lower can, so that the new construction can 5
be installed in cabinets vhaving insufficient in
ternal depth to accommodate the prior devices.
This is a feature of particular importance in the
case of certain rebuilt cabinets, as will be ex
plained hereinafter. «The present invention also 10
includes a further feature which I believe to be
broadly new in refrigerating cabinets generally,
i. e., a horizontal partition substantially com
pletely separating the upper and lower zones of
the cabinet when the parts are in normal posi 15
tion so that heat transfer by convection from one
zone to the other is substantially prevented. 'I'his
arrangement minimizes the inter-zone tempera
ture differential, reduces refrigerating losses, and
by permitting the maintenance of more equable
>temperatures and more accurate _control thereof
lessens the depreciating effects of storage on the
products in the cans.
`
Additional objects are concerned with gener-‘
ally improving the accessibility of the cabinet
Used in the same cabinets, the shorter ‘ contents, particularly the cans in the lower zone
cans are stacked two high, and inasmuch as the
cabinets invariably have closed sides and bottoms
and are provided with top openings only, it has
been necessary to provide means for rendering
the cans in the lower zone of the cabinet con
veniently accessible to an attendant reaching
throughv the top opening. Unless some such
special means beV provided it would be necessary,
7, in the case of a well filled cabinet, bodily to
remove from the cabinet an upper can to reach
a lower one, and this is manifestly inconvenient,
unsanitary, time-consuming, and wasteful of re
frigeration.
‘in
structure, including each pair of superposed cans,
occupies a minimum of vertical space with the
parts at rest and requires no additional vertical
space when the parts are moved to gain access
l
In my copending application above identified
I disclosed a cabinet provided with means for
rendering -the ~low'ei- cans or goods readily ac
cessible through the top opening. The present
invention provides a different type of means for
’ this purpose, having certain advantages over my
earlier construction and over the best of the
prior art devices with which I am acquainted,
among which advantages the following may be
mentioned:
The new construction excels in simplicity, low
cost and ease of installation.
For use in cabi
nets of multiple width, containing cans in two or
more longitudinally extending rows set aside by
side, the new construction is superior to any
other cabinet of which I am aware. Its internal
thereof, preventing adhesion of the cans to the
can supporting elements and ancillary structure,
preventing undesired movement of the cans, par
ticularly while dippingthrusts arebeing made into 30
their contents, maintaining the cans in accurate
alignment with the top openings of the cabinet,
and in eiïecting other and further advantages
which will sufliciently appear from 'the descrip
tion hereinafter of the invention in certain pre
ferred forms of embodiment.
For the purpose of illustrating the invention,
I have shown in the accompanying drawings, and
will now proceed to describe, certain embodi
ments of the invention which are at present pre
ferred by me since the same have> been found in
practice to give satisfactory and reliable results
in accomplishing all the objects set forth herein
above, as well as others.
In _the drawings,
Figure 1 is a top plan View, partly broken away
45
to show the interior of a cabinet provided with
an embodiment of the invention;
Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section;
Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one vform of re 50
ceptacle-supporting tray;
Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view taken on the
line 4-4 of Fig. 3; ,
Fig. 5 is a detail view of a receptacle-supporting
tray with one portion in raised position;
2
2,112,482
.
vFig. 6 is a cross sectional view of a modiñed
form of receptacle-supporting tray; and
Fig. 'I is a cross sectional view of a further
modified form of receptacle-supporting tray.
5
Referring to -the drawings, the reference nu
meral I designates‘generally a cold storage cabi
net of familiar form and widespread use in~ retail
outlets for 'ice cream and the like. The cabinet
construction is old- per se and consists of 'an in
10 sulated box having closed sides, ends and bottom,
top openings 2 closed by lids 3, and a coil or other
limitation is not a factor, the trays may be sup
ported on means other than the lower cans, as`
by brackets or the like extending from the bottoni
or side walls of the cabinet, and this expedient
may be adopted Where it is desired to replace
one or more of the lowercans by an open lower
zone space capable of accommodating packages
of brick ice cream, boxes of ice cream bars, or 10
allied loose goods.
>
»
refrigerating means 4 positioned in heat exchange
In using the' invention, it isevident that access
relation with the cabinet interior, as by being
to any can of the upper tier may be had by simply
removing the appropriate -lid 3. Any can of the
lower tier which happens to be beneath an un 15
occupied portion 9 of a tray 8 may'be reached
built into the cabinet walls. The illustrated cabi
15 net isof approximately forty gallons capacity,
being capable of accommodating eight five-gallon
cans or sixteen two-and-one-half-gallon cans or
the equivalent thereof. ' The cans are arranged in
two horizontally. adjacent longitudinally extend
20 ing rows, and eight top openings are provided,`
each aligned with one of the five-gallon cans or
the equivalent space. As I have explained, in the
preferredvpr'esent day use of these cabinets half
size cans stacked two high are substituted for
25\;the full size cans formerly used. According to
by raising that portion 9.- To reach a can of the
lower tier which is covered by a portion 9 which
happens to be occupied by a can 6, ~the can 9 is
slid over on to the companion portion 9 and the 20'
then unoccupied portion 9 is raised to expose the
desired lower can' 5. To facilitate this latter
operation certain features are desirably incorpo
rated in the trays as follows:
'
ject upwardly above the surface on which the
one-half-gallon ~cans may be used in lieu of the
eight five-gallons cans. In the drawings the
can rests.
equivalents are used _ because the 'cans of the
uppervtier of each row are intended to be moved
to provide access to the cans or space in the lower
96 tier, and to accommodate such movement a blank '
or unoccupied space equal to the volume of one
can must be provided in the upper tier for each
pair of cans in the lower tier. These unoccupied
`spaces are ‘designated 1 in the drawings.
` T0 support the cans 9 of the'upper tier I provide
a series of trays 8, one for each can of the upper
tier, each tray overlying a pair of adjacent cans
5 _of the lower tier. Each tray comprises two
similar portions 9, 9 hinged together at III, and
45 each portion -is preferably square in planand
capable of completely covering a can 5 of the
lower >tier andsupporting a can 6 of the upper
tier.' In a multiple row cabinet, like that shown
in Figs. 1 and 2, the trays may be arranged
5o crosswise of the cabinet. In a single row cabinet
they would necessarily extend longitudinally and
of course even in a multiple row'cabinet they
25
(1) The hinge I0 is disposed so as not to pro
the-present invention as many as twelve two-andlower cans are designated 5, and the upper cans
30 are designated 9. In the illustrated example,
twelve rather than sixteen half size cans or their
40
valuable and important feature of the present
invention. In other cabinets, where vertical space
In this way no obstruction is offered
to the free and easy sliding movement of the can
. from one portion 9 to the other.
»
(2) Skid rails or tracks may be formed on the 30
can-engaging surfaces of the portions 9 to mini
mize the‘areas of the can and tray surfaces in
contact and reduce the sticki?gjconsequent- upon
the freezing of condensationY on these surfaces.
In Figs. 4 and 6 I show suggested forms ofA such ‘ '
rails or tracks, designated II and I2 respectively,
the construction of which is thought to be ob
vious.
»
-
-v
'
(3) Upstanding side and end flanges I3 are
preferably formed about the perimeter -of each 40
tray to stiften the portions 9, maintain the can
-Wholly on the tray. and ,prevent adjacent trays
frominterfering with each other when a portion
_
9 of one of them is being raised or lowered.
(4) Finger holds, like the' corner pieces shown
at I4, are preferably provided near the free ends
ofthe portions 9 to render it easy for an __oper
ator to lift a portion which does no_t support a . __
can but which covers a lower can to which access
is
desired. A*
'
'
_
-
"
`
50
(5) It is desirable to provide some sort of means
to limit the_angle through which the lifted por
may be arranged longitudinally, with adjacent
55
tion may be moved, so as to‘prevent-its collapsing
trays s_et- side’by side across the width of the _ on the companion portion when it is raised and l
cabinet, -but I >prefer 4the arrangementA shown. there is no can supported on the tray. 0f course,
'I'he hinge II--is constructed to permit either por
‘when a can is on the tray, the raised portion
will rest against that can; Such a means is
tion 9 to be raised to or slightly beyond the ver
tical, as shownin Fig. 5 and in the case of the
third tray from the -left in Figs. l and 2. The
_ 90 trays support'the cans of the upper tier, one can
l on each tray, and thetrays are themselves sup
shown in Figa-3 and 5, where the side flanges
I3 are bevelled at theirinner- ends. 'I‘hese ends
may» abut each other to limit the angle of the
_raised portion, ~or they may beA formed in par
allel, adjacentv planes, so as to clear eachother
by or over the cans l of the lower tier.
It ,is simpler and more economical. of vertical ' and abut the floor of the companion portion of
_
Y
N
‘ Space to rest the 'traysdirectly onthecans 5 and the tray.'A
i65 this'arrangement is to be preferred in some'cases.
It isl of particular utility in the case of certain
rebuilt cabinets, of‘which there are now vlarge
numbers> in use, in which a repositioning` of the
(6) _The- portions 9 are preferably imperforate
and their edges extend beyond the perlpheries of
the lower cans.' In this way the lower cans, which `
are preferably without lids, arev protectd from
refrigerating elements. „hasf reduced the vertical contamination by dirt, frost and the like 'which
-70 space to just _slightly more than enough to accom- ' might otherwise drop into them. Any such for 70
' modate two
two-and-one-half-gallon '
heign matter which ands'- its way _into thecabinet
cans. Interposition of the slight thickness o_f‘a will be caughtv by the trays` and either be re
tray l does not elevate the top of an-upper can - tained thereon orbe shed therefrom at -the hinge
i too high to nt within such a‘cabinet',_and this Il or the ends thereof when a_ portion' l is raised.
75 economy of vertical space is therefore a very It is evident that _matter dropped from these'
3
2,1 12,482
points cannot enter the cans 5 but will fall be
tween them.
Ivcome now to an explanation of the refriger
ating and temperature advantages referred to
Ul hereinabove. ~In actual practice adjacent trays
8 are in edge abutting relation or substantially
so, and the side and end walls of the cabinet
are engaged or substantially enga-ged by certain
edges'of the trays adjacent thereto, although in
10 Figs. >1 and 2 I have, in order to clarify the dis
closure, exaggerated the spacings.
That is to
' say, in actual practice all of the trays together,
when the portions 9 thereof are all in horizontal
position, which is their normal condition, extend
.15 substantially continuously from end wall to end
wall and from side wall toside Wall of the cabinet
and constitute a partition separating the upper
zone of _the cabinet from the lower. _ This pro
vides an effective and'valuable barrier to inter
20 zone heat transfer by convection currents of air
and results in a distinct improvement' in tem
perature conditions within the cabinet, as will be
evident from the following considerations:
Ice cream begins to melt at about 18° above
substantially halved by the partition. The en
tire cabinet interior is not opened to swirling
currents of outer air, as would be the _case if no
partition were present.
'
The trays are preferably made of sheet metal
cf appropriate gauge and rigidity.
It will be appreciated that certa-in of the char
acteristics and features of the constructions here
in explained, although desirable in themselves,
may be dispensed with at the option of the de
signer without sacrificing other advantages of
the essential invention. Various modiñcations
may be introduced. The essential features of
patentable novelty are deñned by the -appended
claims, and all modified embodiments are to be 15
considered within the scope and purview of the
claims to the extent that they incorporate the
broad principles of the invention set forth in the
claims, which are to be construed as limited only
by their express limitations and as required by. 20
the state of the prior art.
I claim:
'
x.
1. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and the
like comprising an insulated box having an open
zero Fahrenheit. The best keeping temperature
for ice cream is generally considered to be about
tcp and closed sides and bottom adapted to con 25
tain superposed horizontal .tiers of receptacles,
5° above zero. 'I'he upper zone ~of a cabinet is
closure means for the top of. the cabinet, cool
always warmer than the lower, both because of , ing means in heat 'exchange relationvwith the
the natural tendency of warm air within the cabinet interior, and a receptacle-supporting
30 cabinet to rise and because of' the proximity of tray horizontally supported over two adjacent
30î
the- upper zone to the top openings 2 through receptacles of the lower tier. said tray compris- "
which Warm air from the outside enters when
ing two portions, each having an area suiiicient
ever a lid is removed. To compensate for this - to accommodate a receptacle of the upper tier,
tendencytoward unequal temperatures in the up
35 per and lower zonesfcabinets are generally pro
vided with «a greater length of coil in the upper
zone than in the lower, as is shown in Fig. 2. In
other words, more refrigerating effort must be
expended in the top of the cabinet than in the
40 bottom. Notwithstanding such coil disposition, a
considerable temperature ,diñerential persists in
' cabinets unprovided with the new tray means.
For example, tests of such cabinets have shown
mean temperatures of 10° in the upper cans and
6° in the' lower cans, or an average of 8°, these
readings being taken suñicîently long after re
hinged together whereby one portion may be
raised to expose a receptacle of the lower tier 35
while the other portion remains horizontally sup
ported over an adjacent receptacle of the lov/c;`
tier.
2. A cold storage cabinet» for ice cream and the
like comprising an insulated box having anopen 40
top and closed sides and bottom adapted to con
tain superposed horizontal tiers of receptacles,
closure means for the top of the cabinet, cooling
means in heat exchange relation with the cabinet
interior, and a receptacle-supporting itray rest 45
ing on two adjacent receptacles of the lower tier
and supporting a receptacle of the upper tier,
placing all the lids to- give a true indication of
what maybe regarded as permanent conditions.
This temperature of the ice cream in the upper
said tray comprising two portions, each having
cans is too high for best preservation of -the
cream, but if it were reduced to the optimum
of the upper tier, hinged together whereby one 50
portion may be raised to expose a receptacle of
point the cream in the lower cans would suiîer
from too low temperatures.
I
Similar tests of the cream in cabinets provided
with the new tray means have shown upper can
an area suilicient to accommodate a receptacle
the lower tier while the other portion rests on ’
an adjacent receptacle of the lower tier.'
3. «A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and the
li'ke comprising an insulated box having an open- 55
temperatures averaging 6° and lower tempera
top and closed sides and bottom adapted to con- '
tures of 4°, or a mean of 5°, which is the opti
mum. Neither of these extremes is appreciably
above or below the optimum, so that all the cream
tain superposed horizontal tiers of receptacles,
closure means for the top of the cabinet, cooling
means in heat exchange relation with the cabinet
interior, a receptacle-supporting tray horizon 60
ta‘ely supported over two adjacent receptacles of
the lower tier, said tray’comprising two portions,
is kept at practically ideal temperature condi
tions. The explanation of this result is probably
that the partition formed by the several trays
substantially isolates the upper zone from the
lower, protecting the lower zone from warm air
each having an area suñicient to cover a recep
tacle of the lower tier and support a receptacle of
A.he upper tier, hinged together whereby one por 65
' currents introduced when a lid is removed. The
, greater coil length present in the upper zone , tion may be raised to expose a receptacle of the
rapidly cools the warm air so admitted to the
upper zone and confined thereto, and the iso
lated lower zone is never appreciably warmed
by such air. Moreover, in many cases a lid is
lower tier while the other portion remains hori
zontally supported'over an adjacent receptacle
ofthe lower tier, and means associated with each
portion adapted to be` engaged by thepñnger's -o'f
removed tol give access to an upper can, and no ’ an operator when raising said portion.
portion 9 ifs raised, and in such cases ¿the quan
tity of outer air which can be admitted is mate
rially limited by the fact that the effective vol
ume of cabinet space opened to the outer air is
70'
'
4. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and the
like comprising an insulated box having an open
top and closed sides and bottom adaptedto con
tain superposed horizontal tiers of receptacles, 75
4
animeel
tally supported over two adjacent receptacles of
the lower tier. said tray comprising two portions,
closure means for the top of the cabinet, cooling
means in heat exchange relation with the cabinet
interior, and a receptacle-supporting tray hori
zontally supported` over two adjacent receptacles
of the lower tier, said tray comprising two por
each having an area suillcient- to cover a recep
tions, each having an area suiiicient to accom
closure means for the top of. the cabinet, cooling
means in heat exchange relation with the cabinet
interior, a .receptacle-supporting tray horizon
tacle of the lower tier and support a receptacle
of the upper tier,_hinged together -whereby one
portion may be raised to expose a receptacle of
10 the lower tier while the other portion remains
horizontally supported over an adjacent recep
modate a receptacle of the upper tier, hinged
together whereby one portion may be raised to
expose a receptacle of the lower tier -while the
.other portion remainsV horizontally supported
tacle of the lower tier, and ribs projecting above
each portion having a shoulder adapted to abut
the upper surface of each of said portions for
spacing the bottoniV of a receptacle of'the upper
tier above said surface.
5. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and the
the other portion to limit raising of the shouldered
like comprising an insulated box having an open
top and closed sides and bottom adapted to con
tain superposed horizontal tiers of. receptacles,
closure means for the top of the cabinet, cooling
means in heat exchange relation with the cabinet
interior, a receptacle-supporting tray resting on
two adjacent receptacles of the lower tier and
supporting a receptacle of the upper tier, _said
tray comprising two portions, each having an
10
over anadjacent receptacle of the lower tier,
portion.
9. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and
the like comprising an insulated box having an
open top and closed sides and bottom adapted
to contain two sets of receptacles arranged _side
'by side, -each set comprising an upper tier and a
lower tier, closure means för the top of the cabi
1.5
net, cooling means in heat exchange relation
with the cabinet interior, and a receptacle-sup
porting tray extending transversely of the cabl
net and horizontally supported over adjacent
lower tier receptacles of the two sets, said'tray
comprising two portions, each having an area
the upper tier, hinged together whereby one por-- suñicient to accommodate a receptacle of the
tion may be raised to expose a receptacle of the ` upper tier, hinged together whereby one portion
lower tier while the other portion rests on an may be raised to expose a receptacle of the lower
adjacent receptacle of the lower tier, and ribs tier While the other portion remains horizontally
projecting below the lower surface of each of said vsupported over the adjacent receptacle of the
area sufficient to accommodate a receptacle of
portions for spacing said surface above the top
of a receptacle of the lower tier.
6. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and the
L3 CA like comprising an insulated box having an open
top and closed sides and bottom adapted to con
tain superposed horizontal tiers of receptacles,
closure means for the top of the cabinet, cooling
means in heat exchange relation with the cabi
40 net interior, a receptacle-supporting tray resting
on two adjacent receptacles of the lower tier and
supporting a receptacle oi' the upper tier, said
tray comprising two portions, each having an
area suiiicient to accommodate a receptacle of
the~upper tier, hinged together whereby one por
tion may be raised to expose a receptacle of the
lower tier while the other portion rests on an
adjacent receptacle of the lower tier,l ribs pro
jecting below the lower surface of each of said
lower tier.
'
.
10. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and
the like comprising an insulated box having an
open top and closed sides and bottom adapted
to contain superposed horizontal tiers of recep
tacles, closure means for the top of the cabinet,
cooling~ means in heat exchange relation with the
cabinet interior, and a, plurality of receptacle
supporting trays horizontally supported in the
cabinet, each tray overlying two adjacent re
40
ceptacles of the lower tier and supporting a re
ceptacle of the upper tier and Acomprising two
substantially imperforate portions hinged to
gether whereby one portion may be raised to ex 45
pose a receptacle of the lower tier while the other
portion remains horizontally supported over an
adjacent receptacle of the lower tier, and `all of
said trays together, when the, portions thereof
portions for spacing said surface above the top f are all in horizontal position, extending substan 50
of a receptacle of. the lower tier, and ribs project
ing above the upper surface of each of said por
tions for spacing the bottom of a receptacle of
the upper tier above said surface.
7. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and the
like comprising an insulated box having an open
top and closed sides and bottom adapted to con
tain superposed horizontal tiers of receptacles,
closure means for the top of the cabinet, Acooling
tially continuously from end wall to end wall and
from- side Wall to side wall of the cabinet and
constituting a partition separating the upper zone
of the cabinet from the lower Vand. substantially
preventing inter-zone heat transfer by convec
tion.
11. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and
the like comprising an insulated box having an
open top and-closed sides and bottom adapted .- i
to contain a tier of receptacles in the lower zone 60
not interior, and a receptacle-supporting tray ` of the cabinet and a superposed tier of recep
60 means in heat exchange relation with the cabi
horizontally supported over two adjacent recep
tacles of the lower tier, said tray comprising two
tacles in ther upper zone,l closure means for the
top of the cabinet, cooling means in heat ex
change relation with the lower zone of the cabi
net and cooling means of relatively greater-ca 65
pacity‘in heat exchange relation with the upper
expose a receptacle of. the lower tierl while the ‘ zone, and a plurality of receptacle-supporting
other portion remains- horizontally supported trays horizontally supported in the cabinet„ea,ch '
over anl adjacent receptacle of the lower tier, in tray overlying two adjacent receptacles in the
lower zone and supporting a receptacle in the 70
combination with means carried by each por
` portions, each having an area suiiicient to accom
modate a receptacle of the upper tier, hinged
together whereby’one portion may be raised to
lion to limit raising of said portion.l `
" upper zone and comprising two substantially
8. A cold storage cabinet for ice creani and the ` imperforateA portions hinged together whereby
like comprising an insulated box having an open one portion may be raised to exposela receptacle
in the lower zone while the other portion re
top and closed sides and bottom adapted to con
mains-horizontally supported over an adjacent 75
tain
superposed
horizontal
tiers
of
receptacles,
75
2,1 12,482
receptacle in the “lower zone, and all of said
tion with a ñ‘
5
ge upstanding from the free edges
trays together, when the portions thereof are of said p_ortio adapted to prevent foreign mat
all in horizontal position, extending substantial
ter on the portions from dropping into the re
ly continuously from end wall to end wall and ceptacles of the lower tier.
from side wall to side wall of the cabinet and
13. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and
constituting a partition separating the upper >the like comprising -an insulated box having an
zone of the cabinet from the lower and substan
open top and closed sides and bottom adapted to
tially preventing inter-zone heat transfer by con
contain superposed horizontal tiers of recepta
vection.
cles, closure means for the top of the cabinet,
12. A cold storage cabinet for ice cream and cooling means in heat exchange relation with
the like comprising an insulated box having an the cabinet interior, and a receptacle-supporting
open top and closed sides and bottom adapted to tray horizontally supported over two adjacent
contain superposed horizontal tiers of receptacles, receptacles of the lower tier, said tray comprising
closure means for the top of the cabinet, cooling two portions, each having an imperforate area
means in heat exchange relation with the cabi
suñicient to accommodate a receptacle of the 15
net interior, and a receptacle-supporting tray 'upper tier and substantially to cover one of said
horizontally supported over two adjacent recep
two receptacles of the lower tier, hinged to'
tacles oi' the lower tier, said tray comprising two gether whereby one portion may be raised to ex
portions, each having an area suilici'ent to ac
commodate a receptacle of the upper tier and
substantially to cover one of said two receptacles
of the lower tier, hinged together whereby one
portion may be raised to expose one of said two
receptacles while the other portion remains hor
g5 izontally supported over the other, in combina
pose one of said two receptacles while the other
portion remains horizontally supported over the 20
other, in combination with a ilange upstandlng
from the free edges of said portions adapted to
prevent foreign matter on the portions from
dropping into the receptacles of the lower tier.
WILLIAM P. CRISMAN.
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