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Патент USA US2112610

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March 29,1938.
_
H.W.YSH’ERMAN
_
~ 2,112,610
KNlTTING MACHINE YARN 'CONTR'OL
Filed Nov. 24, 1936
‘I '
9 Shegts-Sheet’l
'
March 29, 1938.
'
H. w. SHERMAN
‘
,
2,112,610
KNl'TT'lNG MACHINE YARN CONTROL
Filed Nov. 24, 1936
gsheets-sheet 2
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-
INVENTOR:
Hear W?lwrmmu
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_
ATTORNEY
'
‘
'
.
March 29, 1938.
-
VH. w. SHERM-AN
_ ‘2,112,310
KNITTING MACHINE‘ YARN CONTROL
7
Filed Nov. 24, 1956
9 SheetS-Sheet z
A TTORNEY.
March 2.9, 1938;
- H. w. SHER;MAN‘
'
2,112,610
KNITTING MACHINE kARN CONTROL
‘ Filed NOV. 24, 1936
_
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INVENTOR.‘
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_
March 29, 1938.
H. W. SHERMAN
2,112,610
KNITTING MACHINE YARN CONTROL
Filed NOV. 24, 1936
FlE-_E_
9 Sheets-Sheet s,
March 29,- 1938. 7
2,112,610
H. w. SHERMAN.,
KNITTING MACHINE YARN CONTROL
Filed Nov. 24, 1936
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9 Sheets-Sheet 6
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BY
ATTORNEY’.
-March 29, 1938.
-
H. w. SHERMANv
2,112,610
KNITTING ~IVIAQH'IIIINE YARN CONTROL
Filed Nov. 24-, 1956
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9 Sheets-Sheet 7
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INVENTOR.‘
BY
ATTORNEK _
_ March 29, 1938.
H. w. SHERMAN
2,112,610
KNITTING MACHINE YARN CONTROL
Filed Nov; 24, 1936
.-
9 Sheets-Sheet 8 '
INVEN TOR:
‘
11am? PIX/Sherwin;
March 29, 1938;
2,112,510
H. W. SHERMAN
KNITTING MACHINE YARN CONTROL
Filed Nov. 24, 1956
9 Sheets-Sheet 9
.
_
INVEN TOR.‘
ATTORNEY.
Patented‘ Mar. 29, ‘1938
2,112,610
PATENT OFFICE Y’
- UNITED STATES
2,112,610
KNITTING MACIHNE YARN CONTROL
Henry W. Sherman, Reading, Pa.
Application November 24, 1936, Serial No. 112,448
10 Claims.
(01. 66-127)
My invention relates to novel means for ma
nipulating yarns in knitting machines, and par
ticularly to means for manipulating the yarns of a
full-fashioned stocking blank to doubly reinforce
an area knitted. by the so-called alternating-car
rier method.
‘
In a full-fashioned stocking blank'having the‘
so-called heel-in-heel areas, there are the usual
body web of single layer thickness, and the upper
heel areas each of triple thickness.
If the body web be produced» by a single main
carrier, then with two extra. carriers laying yarns
in each upper heel-in-heel area, there are ?ve
carriers in all, working from the one friction rod
15 in machines as hereinbefore employed.
, If the body web be produced by three carriers
operating in recurrent sequence, under the so
called "ring1ess,” principle, there will'then be a
total of seven carriers required under former prac
20 tices to produce the upper heel-in-heel area of the
blank, but since three of the carriers are operated
sequentially by a single friction box, the heat of
friction between the friction boxes and the rod
is substantially the same as when the body web
25 is produced by a single main carrieri
‘
'
justable in the relation of its yarncarrier'bars
and stops.
'
Another object of the invention is to increase
the capacity of a machine to handle many yarns,
as by operating a plurality of yarn carriers from 5
one friction box or like means for'conne'cting
the carriers to an actuating means, whereby to
render the machine more ?exible in the variety
of operations it may effect without material
change in, or substitution of,.its yarn-manipulat
ing or other parts.
_
Another object of the invention is to so operate
a plurality of yarn carriers by only one friction
box, and to so positively move or reciprocate each
of these carriers in both directions in laying yarn
to the loop-forming mechanism of a knitting'ma
chine, as to ensure against asynchronous opera
tion of the carriers, and to avoid the production
of defective fabric and the expense and delay
caused by stoppages of the machine.
20
With these and other advantages incident to a
utilization of the improvement, the invention
comprises the parts and combinations thereof
herein set forth and claimed, with ‘the under
standing that the several necessary elements may '25
In either ‘case, under modern high-speed pro
be varied in size, texture, relation, combination,
duction‘ methods, either the ?ve carriers, in the
operation and other features without departing
from the spirit and scope of the invention which
for purposes of explanation is made the subject
one instance, or the seven carriers in the other
instancecau‘se excessive heating of the. friction
30 rod.
of illustration.
'
In the drawings:
'>
Also, in the feature whereby seven carriers op
-Figure 1 is a top plan view having distance
erated by ?ve friction boxes are required to lay
the‘ yarns in the upper .heel-in-heel areas, or 1 breaks, of a substantial portion of a full-fashioned
these carriers are all laying silk yarn, a sufficient knitting machine constructed in accordance with
number of further carriers is‘ not permitted for the invention; the view being taken from portions
other uses, such as laying cotton yarn, placing a thereof intermediate the ends of the machine to-'
colored yarn in the picot edge or laying a heavy
yarn in the welt.
,
An object of the invention'is to avoid the ob
40 jections to prior devices of the above-indicated
character by mechanism that is simple and dur
able in construction, economical to manufacture,
effective in operation and adaptable to a usual
machine with substantially minimum change.
Another object of the invention is to reduce the
heat of friction incident to the use of a plurality
of carriers, such as the ?ve or seven carriers above
mentioned, for use in the upper heel-in-heel areas,
50 each operated by a separate friction box'or unit
mounted on one friction rod or actuator.
Another object of the invention is to provide
certain interchangeable parts, to reduce the num
'' ber of elements, and to facilitatemanufacture and
55 assembly rendering the device more readily ad
.30
ward the left end portions, as viewedv from the
front, parts being omitted;
_
Fig. 2 is a view, similar to Fig. l of portions of
the machine from intermediate portions to right
end portions thereof, which when placed in proper'
relation to Fig. 1 completes a composite top plan
view of the machine, with the exceptions noted;
Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail view taken along a
line 3-3 of Fig. l;_
,
~
-
Fig. 4 is a view in elevation, taken substantially
along the line 4-4of Fig. 3;
'
Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken substantially
along the line 5—-5 of Fig. 4;
.
Fig. 6 is a view, on a reduced scale, similar to
Fig. 5, showing parts thereof in di?erent'oper
ative positions, parts being omitted;
Fig. 7' is a view taken along the line 1--1 of
Fig. 5;
Fig. 8 is a diagram of a full-fashioned'stocking 55 v _
2
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I
'
‘
»
I
Y
2,112,610
leg blank, including a portion as produced by the
invention;
‘‘
,
Fig. 9 is a diagram of yarns as they are laid in
,a' broken line area D of Fig. 8;
Fig.10 is a magnified view showing the loop
formation at one side of the blank in a broken
line area E including a portion of the area D;
Fig. 11 is a view on a reduced scale similar to
Ill and center frames l2, which are connected by
various members extending longitudinally of the
machine, but ‘only two of which, a front beam I4
and a back beam I5, are shown.
' I
The machine further comprises a cam shaft I8 a
supported by the frames I 8 and I2, yarn-carrier
bars I- to 1, inclusive, narrowing carriages G for
supporting carrier bar end stops S adjacent to '
Fig. 4 showing the parts as positioned at one stage . each end of the machine, cam and lever assem—,
'10
of operation;
7
Fig. 12 is 'a- view on a slightly enlarged scale
taken substantially along a line I2-I2 of Fig. 11,
parts being omitted;
‘
Fig. 13 is a view'similar to Fig. 11', showing the
15 parts in other positions;
.
blies 2I and 22, also adjacent to the ends of the
machine, for operating the narrowing carriages G
fromthe cam shaft I8, narrowing lift cam and
lever assemblies 24 associated with the narrowing
carriages G, shogging cams 25 for the cam shaft
I8, a friction rod 28, acarriage structure M for
controlling reinforced selvage stops for all of the
stantially along the line I4—I4 of Fig. 13, parts 'carrier bars but in which only the stops I6 and
‘Fig. 14 is a view similar to, Fig. 12 taken sub
being omitted;
.
_
v
v
‘
Fig. 15 is a view similar to Fig; 11, showing the
20 parts in further positions;
Fig. 16 is a view similar to Fig. 14 taken sub
stantially along the line I6—I6 of Fig. 15; and
Figs. 1'7 to 22, inclusive, are sequence diagrams
showing yarn carrier bars, dogs thereon, end
25 stops therefor and elements for controlling or
operating the bars, the parts being shown in
I1 associated with dogs 26 and 21 on the carrier
bars 6 and 1, respectively, Fig. 17, are of interest
herein, a selector mechanism U for connecting ~
carrier bars to, and disconnecting them from, the
friction rod 28, a cam and lever assembly 34 for
operating the selector mechanism U, and a pat
tern device or chain motion mechanism P for
controlling certain members or mechanisms to
operate in predetermined sequence.
.
The selector mechanism U is shown and de'—
In practicing the invention with a.machine . scribed in detail in copending application, Serial
for producing “rlngless” full-fashioned stocking No. 677,443, ?led June 24, 1933 by Gustav Gas
30 blanks,v a multi-carrier selector, which is not of trich on “Yarn ‘feeding mechanism for straight 30'
knitting machines”, and need" not be furtherv
itself a part of this invention, comprises a fric
tion box including elements for control by a described herein, except to state that it com
pattern mechanism to connect the box to, and prises a special alternating-carrier friction box
38, including a slide 38 for cooperation with dogs
disconnect it from, the separate body-yarn‘car
H, 42 and 43 on carrier bars I, 2 and 3, re 35
>
'
35 riers in sequence.
various positions and relations of - operation.
' Two other friction boxes are each provided with
a slide for'connecting the box to a carrier for
laying a reinforcing yarn different from the body
yarns and which, in this instance is the larger
40 or main heel area reinforcing yarn. These other
friction boxes are also each provided with a cam
operated lever for selectively connecting each
body-yarn carrier to the box, when it is not lay
ing a body yarn to the loop-forming mechanism,
45 ‘to lay the second, or so-called “heel-in-heel”
reinforcing yarn.‘ The stops for the various car
rier bars, and the friction-box slide connecting
dogs on these bars, are arranged such that all
of the carriers are reciprocated the proper dis
tances, which may be selectively changed.
In this structure, all of the carrier bars‘ are
positively actuated by the actuator or friction
box means in both directions of reciprocation in
synchronous time relation; the reverse positive
movement being distinguished, for instance, from
the movement in a device where a movable mem
her is positively moved by an actuator against
the action of a spring in one direction and by
the spring in the opposite direction upon the
spectively, to connect the latter to, and dis- '
connect the same from, the friction rod 28 where-_ '
by corresponding separate yarns may be laid to
the loop-forming mechanism of the machine in
repeated numerical sequence in accordance with 40
the “ringless” stocking knitting principle.
Splicing friction boxes L and R, shown .gen
orally in Figs. 1 and 2, and parts of which are
shown in Figs. 17 to 22, inclusive, are substantial
duplicates; the box L including an arm 45 for
cooperation with dogs LI, L2 and L3, on the car
rier bars I,_ 2 and 3, respectively,.and the box R ’
including an ,arm 46 for‘ cooperation with dogs
RI, R2 and R3 .on the carrier bars, I, 2 and 3,
. respectively.
The box L further includes a slide
48 having a lug 49 for cooperation with dogs L1
and 1L on>the carrier bar 1. Similarly, the box
50'
R includes a slide 5I having a lug 52 for-coopera
tion with dogs R6 and. GR on the carrier bar 6.
Referring particularly to Figs. 3 to '1, inclusive, 1
the' box L comprises a 'housing 51, including
usual friction pads 58 and shoes 59 held to the
friction rod 28 by a bowed leaf spring 6|, and'an
operating handle or cam lever 62 pivotally mount
withdrawal of the actuator, in which interference ' ed on a pin 63 journaled in a clamp member 64
associated with the housing 51.
with the action of the spring may. occur inde
The arm 45 is secured, as by screws 65, to one
pendently of the action of ‘the actuator.
The drawings illustrate only those parts of a arm 66 of a lever 61 pivotally mounted on a shaft‘
68 and having another arm 1I carrying a roller
“Reading” full fashioned stocking knitting ma
chine necessary for an understanding of the in
- vention, Loop-forming mechanism and other
65
parts and the operation thereof are well known.
as shown and described in the “Reading” Full
Fashioned ‘Knitting Machine Catalogue, copy
right 1935, and published by the Textile Machine
Works, Reading, Pennsylvania.
'
Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 for a general outline
of a machine for which the invention is adapted,
a base support or framework, on which the op
75 erating parts are mounted, comprises. end frames
follower 12 for coaction with a stationary cam 65
bar 13. The latter is formed as a clamp mem
ber, as shown in Fig. 5, cooperating with a com
plementary clamp member 15 formed to receive,
and clamped by screws 14 against, a stationary
rod support 16 secured to the machine frame.
The arm 45, for cooperation with'the three
carrier dogs LI,‘ L2 and L3, has a free end por
tion 11 to accurately fit in a top recess between
a pair of projections on each of these dogs, and
a standard 18 supporting a screw 19, which, as 75
2,112,610
- 3
indicated in Fig. 6, is for insertion into a screw
threaded apertured portion of one side of the
box housing whereby to lock the arm 45 in in
operative position. The arm 45 operates between
side projections 82 which reinforce the 'arm'
against side thrust when the box is moving a car
rier bar. The box L is provided with another
pair of side projections 83 like the projections 82
in order that it may be interchangeable with the
friction box R. In other words, the housings R
and L are duplicates, and when assembled, the
corresponding lever 61 is mounted so that the
arm 45 operates either between the projections
82 or the projections 83 depending on whether
The arm 45 is adapted to be dropped into a slot
in any one of the dogs LI, L2, and L3, and the
arm 46 is adapted tolbe dropped into a slot in
any one of the dogs RI, R2 and R3, by action
of the follower ‘I2 on the cam ‘I3 at the beginning
Hook-like arms 84 embrace a. back narrowing
shaft 85 and are secured, as by screws 86, to
Fig. 12 hits the arm 45, the latter serves as a
of a stroke.\ By not being completely removed,
the arm 45 or 46, as the case may be, acts as a
rebound stop until the next three-thread carrier
bar I, 2 or 3 moves one of its dogs under the arm
45 or 46 which is thereby fully released. This 10~
action is clearly exempli?ed in Figs. 11 to 16,111
elusive, in Figs. 11 and 12 of which the arm 45
is in the slot of the dog L3, in the position occu
pied at the end of a stroke of the bar 3.
From the time the parts are positioned as in 15
the assembled structure is to be used in the place '
of the box R or the box L.
Figslll and 12 until the dog LI on the bar I of
members 81 having split-collar cla‘mp portions
rebound stop for the carrier bar 3, after which
the dog LI engages, and exerts a camming action
88 secured by screws 89 to sleeves 9I integral with
the box housing at the‘ ends thereof. This struc
slot in the dog L3.
ture acts as a slide guide for the box preventing
its turning about the friction rod.
carrier bar ‘I with its corresponding stop S.
In producing a portion of the blank with which 25
this invention is concerned, the yarn-manipulat
toward the cam ‘I3 and the free end 11 of the
arm 45 toward the dogs RI, R2 and R3 on the
cated in Figs. 17 to 22, inclusive. ‘
carrier bars I, 2 and 3, respectively.
.
-In the inoperative position of the box L, corre
sponding to a position ofits carriers outside the
knitting ?eld, the lever I02 is turned through an
angle of approximately one hundred and eighty
degrees from its position of Fig. 1, for hooked
holding relation to a lug I04 on the clamp por
tion 88.
ing elements are actuated in sequence, as indi
-
>
As seen in Fig. 1'7, the carrier bars have reached
As better seen in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, a stationary
support 91 is clamped to the rod ‘I6, as by a screw
or screws 98, for pivotally supporting a hook-like
lever I02 on a pin I03.
40
The arm 45 is then moved, ‘
to the end of a stroke, as indicated in Figs. 15
v and 16, determined by the engagement of the
spring 93 to a pin 94 carried by a projection 95
on one .of the members 81 to bias the follower ‘I2
An arm 92 on the lever 61 is connected by a
710
against the arm 45, to raise the latter out of the 4
'
As indicated in Fig. 7, in connection with the
dog L3, each of the dogs LI, L2, L3, RI, R2 and
R3, is secured to the corresponding carrier bar
by a pin and slot connection I06 whereby the
45 longitudinal position of the dog on the bar may
be adjustably?xe'd, after adjustment of a screw
I01 in a member>l08 ?xed to the bar, as by rivet
ing or otherwise.
The dog ‘IL and the dog R6 are provided with
50 adjustable contact screws I I4 for engagement by
the slides 48 and 5|, respectively.
Referring to Fig. 8, a full fashioned‘ stocking
the ends of a movement from right to left in 30
which the carrier bar 3 has been moved by the
slide 39 of the friction box 38 of the selector
mechanism U to lay a yarn to the loop forming
mechanism of the machine from edge to edge of
a portion of the blank between the tops of the . SI
areas K and the course J, the carrier bars 2' and
‘I have been'moved by the arm 45 and the slide
48, respectively, from‘ the inside edge of the left
reinforcement to the left selvage edge by the left
splicing friction box L, and the carrier bars I 40
and 6 have been moved from the right selvage
edge to a position at the inside edge of the right
reinforcement by the arm 46 and the slide 5|,
respectively. The movable connecting arm 46 of
the right hand box R remains in ‘engagement 45
with the carrier bar I. The movable connecting
arm 45 of the left friction box L is shown as hav- .
ing been disengaged from‘ the carrier bar 2 and.
moved beyond the dogs L2 and L3 on the carrier
‘bars 2 and 3, respectively. 4
50
The arms 5I and 48 for connecting the splic
ing friction boxes R and L to the splicing carrier
leg blank a portion of which the above-described ’ bars 6 and ‘I, respectively, remain in engagement
machine is capable of knitting, comprises a welt
55 W, a leg portion C, reinforced heel areas Hand
heel-in-heel reinforced areas K; the machine be-'
ing operative according tothe invention to knit,
from the ?rst course of ‘the welt W, to an instep
with the splicing carrier bars at all times during
the usual course laying movements thereof, the .
dogs R6, 6R, L‘I and ‘IL on the splicing carrier
course indicated by a dot-and-da'sh line J, after
bars being so positioned as to provide lost mo
tion between the friction boxes R and L and the
carrier. bars. The arms 45 and 46 for connecting
60 which the machine is stopped and adjusted,either
by usual and well-known means or other means
the alternating carrier bars I, 2 or -3 for laying
the heel-in-heel reinforcements K, above the
not constituting part of this invention to ?nish
the blank.
»
.
_ As indicated diagrammatically in Figs. 9 and
65 10, the blank at the areas K, above the course J,
is made up of three separate body yarns Ia, 2a
and 3a, and two reinforcing yarns 6a and ‘la, of
which the yarns 6a and ‘la occupy the areas H,
and the main body yarns Ia, 2a and 3a are not
70 only laid to the knitting head of the machine in
full ‘courses from selvage edge to selvage edge,
but are each brought back into the fabric be
tween the triple spaced full courses thereof in a
series of short courses a: occupying the heel-ini
.75 heel areas K to the start of the heel tab areas.
course J, are raised at the end of each outward
travel of the splicing friction boxes R and L so
that the heel-in-heel carrier bars, which start
their outward movement before the usual splicing
carrier bars, will be disengaged from the corre
sponding splicing friction box R or L before the
corresponding splicing carrier bar 6 or ‘I has
completed its yarn laying movement.
In moving from left to right toward the posi
tions ofFig. 18, the carrier bar 2 and the left
splicing carrier bar ‘I have been mov'ed'by the
selector mechanism U and the box L, respec
tively, to complete a portion of their yarn lay
5
70
4
2,112,610
carrier bar 3 and moved beyond the dogs RI and
ing strokes before the connecting arm 45 of the
left hand box L has been moved to a position
where it will engage carrier bar 3 for reinforc
R3 on the carrier bars I and 3.
In the above-described structure, friction rods
ing the left selvage edge.
and friction boxes are employed, but obviously
'
As .seen in Fig. 18; all the carrier bars have
reached the ends of their movement from left
tov right in which the carrier bar 2 has been
moved by the slide 39, the carrier bars 3 and 1
any substitution for a. friction rod or actuator
having movement relative to, or beyond, a box or
unit when a carrier engages a stop is contem
plated within the invention, whereby if latches
have been moved by the left hand splicing fric- '
or other means are employed, advantages com
tion box L and carrier bars I and 6 have been
parable to the above-mentioned reduction of 10
frictional heat, such as similar reduction of heat
in. the latches and wear of the latches, will be
moved by the right hand splicing friction box
R. Fig. 18 also shows that the connecting arm
46 of the right hand box R has been disengaged
from the car-rier bar I and moved beyond the
obtained.
'
>
.
The improvements speci?cally shown and de
15 dogs on the carrier bars I and'2 so that in they ‘ scribed by which the above-mentioned results are 15
next right to left movement of the carrier bars,
the carrier bar, engaged by the selector mecha
nism U, will be moved through a portion of its
yarn‘laying stroke before the right hand fric
tion box R will engage the remaining alternating
carrier. Thus it will be seen that in moving the
carrier bars, for laying the main body yarn, in
advance of the carrier bars laying the upper heel
in-heel splicing yarns, the splicing friction boxes
will not interfere with the usual operation of the
selector ‘mechanism.
As seen in Fig. 19, the carrier bars have reached
obtained, may be modi?ed without departing
from the invention as set forth in the speci?ca
tion and claims.
I claim:
_
.
1. vIn a straight knitting machine, reciprocable 20
yarn-carrier bars, stops for the bars, friction rod
means, mechanism including a ?rst friction box
for selectively connecting certain carrier bars to
the box for movement thereby to lay lengths of
separate yarns to the loop-forming mechanism of
the machine in ‘recurrent sequence, and means
including a second friction box‘, a stationary cam
the end of their right to left movement in which > disposed adjacent to the path of travel of the
second box, and means including a lever pivotal
the carrier bar I has been moved by the slide 39,
'30 the carrier bars 3 and ‘I have been moved by the
ly mounted on the second box for operation by the
cam to disconnect the separate yarn-carrier bars
_ left hand splicing friction box L, against their
from, and to connect the same to, the second box
end stops and the carrier bars 2 and 6 have been
moved by the right hand splicing friction box R,
for positive movementthereby in both directions
the bars 2 and 6 coming ,to a stop when the dog , to lay further lengths of said separate yarns to
the loop-forming mechanism in successive‘
35 26 on the bar 6 engages the reinforced selvage
stop I8. Fig. 19 also shows that the connecting
arm 45 of the left hand splicing box L has been
disengaged from the carrier bar 3 and moved
beyond the dogs LI and L3 on the carrier bars I
40 and 3, respectively.
In Fig. 20, the carrier bars have reached the
end of- their left to right movement in which the
car ier bar 3 has been moved by the slide 39, the
carfirrier bars I and ‘I have been moved by the
45 left hand splicing friction box L, both of these
bars coming .to a stop by engagement of the dog
21 on the carrier bar ‘I with its reinforced selvage
stop IT. The carrier bars 2 and 6 have been
moved by the right hand splicing friction _box R.
50 against their right end stops, the connecting arm
46 of the right friction box R being shown dis
engaged from the carrier bar 2 and moved be
yond the dogs R2 and R3 on the carrier bars.
2 and 3, respectively.
In Fig. 21, the carrier bars have reached the
ends of their right to left movement in which the
carrier bar 2 has been moved by the slide 33, the
carrier bars 3 and 6 have been moved by the
right splicing friction box R and the carrier bars
60 I and ‘I have been moved by the left splicing fric—.
tion box L. The connecting arm 45 of the left
friction box L_is shown as having been disengaged
from the carrier bar I and moved beyond the
‘dogs LI and L2 on the carrier bars I and 2,
respectively.
In Fig. 22, the carrier bars have reached the'
courses.
.
_
2. In ,a full-fashioned ‘stocking knitting ma
chine, reciprocable yarn-carrier bars, stops for
the bars, friction rod means, mechanism includ
ing a ?rst friction box for connecting to the box 40'
and releasing therefrom three of- said bars in re
current sequence to lay lengths of separate yarns
to the loop-forming mechanism of the machine,
and means including a second friction box, a sta
tionary cam disposed adjacent to the path of
travel of the second box, and a member movably
mounted on the second box for operation by the
cam to disconnect the three bars from the'second
box in the sequence in which they are connected
to the ?rst box and to connect the three bars to 50
the second box in the sequence in which they are
disconnected from the first box for'positive move
ment by the second box in both directions to lay
further lengths ‘of said separate yarns- to the loop
forming mechanism in successive courses.
55
3. In a straight knitting machine, reciprocable
yarn-carrier bars, stops for the bars, friction rod
means, a friction box, mechanism for selectively ,
connecting certain carrier bars to the box for
movement thereby to lay lengths of separate
no
yarns to the loop-forming mechanism of the ma
chine in recurrent sequence, a second friction box,
and means for connecting said separate-yarn car
rier bars and other yarn-carrier bars to the second
box for positive movement thereby in both direc 65
tions to lay further lengths of said separate and
end of their left to right movement in which , said other yarns to the loop-forming mechanism .
the carrier bar I‘has been moved by the slide 39
70 of the selector friction box 38, the carrier bars 2
and ‘I have been moved by the left splicing fric
tion box L and the carrier bars 3 and Shave
been moved by the right splicing friction box R.
The connecting arm 46 of the right friction box R
is shown as having been disengaged from the
in successive courses, a member ‘movably mounted
on the second box for, connecting said other yarn
carrier bars to, and disconnecting them from,_ the 70
second box, a stationary cam disposed adjacent
to the path of travel of the second box, and a
lever pivotally mounted on the second box for
operation by the cam to connect said certain car- '
75
5
2,112,610
rier bars to, and disconnect them from, the second
box.
said cam-controlled means being released from
each of said carriers by another carrier.
8. In a machine for knitting a portion of a full
>
4. In a straight knitting machine, reciprocable
yarn-carrier bars, a friction rod, a friction box,
and means providing for simultaneous operation
by the box of certain bars positively in each direc
fashioned stocking blank, reciprocable yarn-car
rier bars, friction rod means, mechanism includ
ing a friction box for selectively connecting to the
tion and operation of one of said certain bars in
box and releasing therefrom three of said bars in
recurrent sequence to lay lengths of separate
yarns to the loop-forming mechanism of the ma
chine, means including a pair of friction boxes
having elements for connecting other of said car
riers to, and disconnecting them from, the actu
ating means to lay lengths of other yarn to the
loop-forming mechanism reinforcing areas of said
separate yarns for predetermined distances from
the selvage edges of the blank, stops cooperating
with said elements for determining said distances,
dependently of another, including a stationary
cam disposed adjacent to the path of travel of
10 the box, and members movably mounted on the
unit provided one for connecting each of said
certain carriers to, and disconnecting it from, the
unit, one of said movably-mounted members be
ing in the form of a lever pivoted to the box carry
15 ing a follower for operation by the stationary cam.
5. 'In a knitting machine, yarn carriers, actu
ating means, mechanism for selectively connect
' ing certain of the carriers to, and disconnecting
them from, the actuating means for laying lengths
of separate yarns to the loop-forming mechanism
and means including other elements on the fric
tion boxes of said pair for connecting the se
quential carriers to, and disconnecting them from, 20
of the machine in recurrent sequence, and means
the actuating means to lay said separate yarns in
for connecting the sequential carriers to, and dis
connecting them from, the actuating means to lay
other lengths of each of said separate yarns to
further lengths additionally reinforcing prede
the loop-forming mechanism, said connecting
means being controlled by the sequential carriers.
6. In a knitting machine, yarn carriers, actuat
ing means, mechanism for selectively connecting
certain of the carriers to, and disconnecting them
30' from, the actuating means for laying lengths of
separate yarns to the loop-forming mechanism of
25
the machine in recurrent sequence, and means for
connecting the sequential carriers to the actuat
ing means to lay other lengths of each of said
35 separate yarns to the loop-forming mechanism,
said connecting means being released from each
of said carriers by another carrier.
:1
-
'7. In a knitting machine, yarn carriers, actuat
ing means, mechanism for selectively connecting
40 certain of the carriers to, and disconnecting them
from, the actuating means for laying lengths of
separate yarns to the loop-forming mechanism
of the machine in recurrent sequence, and means
including a stationary cam and means mov
45 able with the actuating means controlled by
the cam for connecting the carriers to the actuat
ing means to lay other lengths of each of said
separate yarns to the loop-forming mechanism,
termined portions of said areas.
9. In a full-fashioned stocking knitting ma
chine, loop-forming mechanism, reciprocable re
inforced selvage yarn carriers, stops for the car- '
riers, friction rod means, a friction box, means for ‘
connecting the carriers to the box, and. means for
selectively mounting said connecting means at
either of two positions on the box depending upon 30
whether the box is to operate a carrier at a right
or left-hand selvage.
10. In a knitting machine, needles, reciprocable
yarn carriers, friction rod means, a friction box,
selector means on said box to actuate certain of
the carriers to lay yarn to the needles in strokes
of predetermined sequence, a reinforced selvage
friction box, carrier, controlled means on the re
inforced selvage box for actuating one of the se
quential carriers to lay yarn to the needles dur 40
ing an idle period of said one carrier in the se
quence, and means on said reinforced selvage box
for selectively receiving an element of said car
rier controlled means at either of different posi
tions depending upon whether it is to operate in a 45
right or left-hand selvage.
‘
'
HENRY W. SHERMAN.
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