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Патент USA US2112622

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> March 29, 1938.
H. A. HOKE
_ 2,112,622
SPRING RIGGING FOR LOCOMOTIVES AND OTHER VEHICLES
Filed June 25, 1957
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2 Sheets-Sheet 1
INVENTOR:
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March 29, 1933'-
H. A. HOKE
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2,112,622
SPRING RIGGING FOR LOCOMOTIVES AND OTHER VEHICLES’
Filed June 25, 1937
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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2,112,622
Patented Mar. 29, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,112,622
SPRING RIGGING FOR LOCOMOTIVES AND
OTHER VEHICLES
Harry A. Hoke, Altoona, Pa, assignor to The
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Philadelphia,
Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania
Application June 25, 1937, Serial No. 150,275
12 Claims.
My invention relates generally to spring rigging
for locomotives and other vehicles. More par
ticularly, my invention relates to the manner of
connecting the spring hanger to the spring and
to the equalizer.
For some years the spring rigging in use on rail
way locomotives has included a spring hanger
connected at its ends to an equalizer and to the
spring by means of gibs. These gibs engaged
the hanger through slots formed in the hanger.
Trouble was experienced from excessive wear be
tween the gibs and these slots. This wear re
sulted in a very loose ?t allowing the gibs to in
cline from the vertical. This causes an excessive
0
load and a spreading strain on the hangers at the
slots. Eventual failure of the hangers in a rela
tively short time was the shortcoming of this
rigging.
Therefore, the principal object of my invention
is to provide a gib which will overcome this ex
20 cessive wear and strain at the weakened points of
the hanger. Another object of my invention is
to provide a gib which will freely operate with
guided vertical movement. Another object of my
invention is to reduce the Wear and. tear on the
slots in the hanger by providing a separate guide
to engage the hanger at a point removed. from
the slot. Still further advantages of my inven
tion will become apparent from the following de
tailed description of an embodiment of my in
vention, reference being had to the accompanying
drawings.
Fig. I of the drawings is a side elevation of a
u
G.
conventional locomotive truck partially broken
away to better disclose important details of my
invention.
hanger as adapted for use with the gib of Fig.
VIII.
Fig. X is a perspective view of a modi?ed form
of gib.
Fig. XI is a perspective view of the end of a
hanger adapted for use with the gib of Fig. X.
In Fig. I there is shown a conventional loco
motive truck having a frame 1, wheels 2, journal
boxes 3, center plate 4, center pin 5, equalizers 6,
spring hangers ‘l, semi-elliptical springs 8 and 10
gibs 9 and I0.
-
My invention is speci?cally concerned with the
gib 9 which connects the upper parts of the
hanger ‘I to the semi-elliptical spring 8 through
which the hanger 1 extends, and with the gib In 15
which connects the lower part of the hanger ‘I
with the equalizer 6. Of course my invention
could be used in other types of trucks'than the
one shown in Fig. I. Gibs 9 and II] are alike
and the following description of gib 9 also applies 0
to gib Hi. The gib 9 engages a slot M in the
hanger l in the usual way. The slot M is elon
gated to allow a certain amount of vertical move
ment for the gib 9. The cross section of the gib
9 is shaped according to the slot l4, allowing a 2
small clearance for free movement vertically.
The bottom engaging edge of the gib 9 is rounded
as at l6 and is of su?lcientv length to properly
engage the spring 8 in a cooperating groove II
and distribute the pressure as shown. The upper
edge I‘! of the gib 9 is also rounded but is much
shorter than the edge l6, and cooperates with the
upper portion of the slot M of the hanger 1, its
length being governed by the thickness of the
hanger l.
Shoulders I8 and I9 are provided at‘ 35
each end of the rounded edge I1, and spaced
according to the width of the hanger 1 which ?ts
between
the shoulders l8 and I9.
nection between the semi-elliptical spring and
Having described the conventional gib from
the spring hanger effected by means of the gib. which my invention has been developed, it is
Fig. III is a fragmentary side elevation partly clear that with the conventional gib any wear at
40
in section of the spring and hanger connection. all between the slot M, and the gib 9, the gib‘ 9
Fig. IV is a sectional view of the same taken will incline from the vertical and exert a gradually
about the lines IV-—IV of Fig. 111.
increasing spreading strain on the hanger 1 from
Fig. V is a fragmentary sectional side View within the slot [4. My improved form of gib is 45
' (similar to Fig. III) but of a modi?ed form of gib further provided with guiding arm 20 to overcome
connecting the spring and spring hanger.
this objectionable tendency in- the present con
Fig. VI is a sectional view of the. above taken ventional form of gib. This arm 20 is formed as
a continuation of the shoulder I9 and extends up
about the lines VI-VI of Fig. VI
Fig. VII is a fragmentary sectional view of the wardly, terminating in an inwardly bent end 23,
gib of my invention as used for connecting double the guide pro-per. This. end 23 ?ts with a com
paratively small clearance into a cooperatinglre
hangers to the equalizer.
Fig. VIII is a perspective view of the preferred cess 24 formed in the end of the hanger ‘I. This
construction allows for free vertical movement‘of
form of the gib of my invention.
Fig. IX is a perspective view of the end of a the gib 9, maintains the gib in a vertical position 55
Fig. II is a fragmentary top View of the con
55
2
2,112,622
at all times, and also prevents excessive pressure and also engaging said hanger with capacity for
on the sides of the slot M, in the spring hanger ‘I, ' guided vertical movement relative to said hanger.
through which the gib 9 passes.
4. In a spring rigging having-a spring hanger,
This guiding arm 20 thus distributes the guid
a gib connectingly engaging said hanger and an
ing strain to a point in the hanger removed from
the weak point at the slot l4, thereby relieving
the wear in the slot l4 and avoiding any spread
ing strain within the slot M. It is obvious that
the length of the arm and the distance between
10 the slot l4 and recess 24 greatly reduce the effec
tive spreading strain according to the principles
governing the operation of levers.
A modi?ed form of gib 9a‘is shown in Figs. V,
VI, X, and XI. This gib 9a operates on the same
15 principle as the gib 9 described above and in itself
has certain inherent advantages. The arm 20a
is similar to the arm 20 of Fig. VIII, but is bi-.
furcated at 23a and 23b and embraces the hanger
1a as shown in Fig. V. This avoids the need of
20 the slot 24 and to some extent strengthens the,
other element of said rigging, said gib having ca
pacity for vertical movement relative to said
hanger, a guiding arm formed on said gib, and
a guide slot formed in said hanger receiving said
guiding arm therein.
‘
5. In a spring rigging having a spring hanger, 10
a gib connectingly engaging said hanger and an
other element of said rigging, said gib having ca
pacity for vertical movement relative to said
hanger, a guiding arm formed on said gib, and
a guideslot formed in the end of said hanger re 15
ceiving said guiding arm therein.
6. In a spring rigging having a'spring hanger
and a spring, a gib connectingly engaging said
hanger and said spring, said gib having capacity
ing stress which to a small extent may occur in
for vertical movement relative to said hanger, and .
a guiding arm formed on said gib and engaging
said hanger with capacity for guided vertical
recess 24. Obviously myinvention may be applied
movement relative to said hanger.
hanger 1 by eliminating a portion of the spread
to the connection between the hanger ‘I and the
25 equalizer 6 to the same advantage.
In Fig. VII, I have shown how the gib [00 may
be applied to. double hangers 2'! and 28. receiving
an equalizer .29 therebetween. This is simply
an extension of the above‘ idea and needs no ex
-30 tended comment, since the gib I 00 is formed like
gib 9 and operates in the same way.
All the numbered parts corresponding to the
' preceding ?gures have the'letter “0” added.
The operation of my invention is obvious from
the above description and comments. In this
manner, I provide a simple means for avoiding
thegrapid deterioration of the hangers of a spring
rigging without in the slightest amount reducing
the free play at the connections. The gib of my
invention always remains vertical in its free ver
tical movement and the life of the spring rigging
so equipped has been considerably increased.
WhileI have described a preferred embodiment
and certain modi?cations of my invention above
in some detail, it will be obvious to one skilled in
the art that further variations and changes can
be made without departing from the spirit of the
invention as hereinafter claimed.
Having thus described my invention, I claim:
-1. In a spring rigging having a spring hanger,
a gib connectingly engaging said hangerand an
other _element of said rigging, and a sliding guid
ing means attached to said gib and connected
to said hanger with capacity for guided vertical
movement relative to said hanger.
2. In a spring rigging having a spring hanger,
a gib connectingly engaging said hanger and an
7. In a spring rigging having a spring hanger, a
spring and an equalizer, a gib connectingly engag- .,
ing said hanger to said equalizer, said gib hav
ing capacity for vertical movement relative to
said hanger, and a guiding arm attached to said
gib and engaging said hanger with capacity for
vertical movement relative to said hanger.
30
8. In a spring rigging‘having a spring hanger,
a spring and an equalizer, a gib connectingly en
gaging said-hanger and said spring, a second gib
connectingly, engaging said hanger and said
equalizer, said gibs having capacity for vertical 35
movement relative to said hangers, and guiding
arms formed on each of said gibs, said guiding
arms engaging said hanger with capacity for
guided movement relative to said hanger.
'
9. In a spring rigging, an equalizer, a semi
elliptical spring, a spring hanger, a gib connect
ingly engaging said hanger and said spring, said
gib having capacity for movement relative to said
hanger, a guiding arm formed on said gib en
gaging said hanger with capacity for guided
movement relative to said hanger, and means
connecting said equalizer to said hanger.
10. The invention of claim 9 characterized fur
ther by the fact that said hanger has a slot re- ‘
ceiving said guiding arm.
I
11. In a spring rigging having a spring hanger,
algib‘ connectingly engaging‘ said hanger and an
other element of said rigging, said gib having ca
pacity for vertical movement relative to said
hanger, and a guiding arm formed on said gib,
said arm being bifurcated at its end, said bifur 55
cation guidingly engaging the sides of said
other element of said rigging, said gib having ca
hanger.
pacity for 'vertical movement relative to said
hanger and being formed with a guiding arm
which also engages said hanger with capacity for
hangers, a gib comiectingly engaging said hang
.ers and another element of the rigging, said gib 60
guiding movement relative to said hanger.
having capacity for limited vertical movement
3. In a spring rigging having a spring hanger,
a gib connectingly engaging said hanger and an
other element of said rigging, said gib having
capacity for vertical movement relative to said
hanger, and a guiding arm formed on said gib
relative to said hanger, and a guiding arm formed
on said gib, said arm slidingly engaging one of
12. In a spring rigging having a pair of spring
said hangers for guiding movement relative to 65
said hanger.
HARRY A. HOKE.
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