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Патент USA US2113129

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April 5, 1938.
c. F. DlNl_'EY
2,113,129
TREATMENT OF WORK WITH SOLVENTS_
Filed May 15, 1934
3 Sheets-Sheet 1
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WITNESSES:
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INVENTOB:
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d. M
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TTORNEYS.
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April 5, 1938.
C_ F_ DlNLEY
I
2,113,129
TREATMENT‘OF WORK WITH SOLVENTS
Filed May 15, 1954
WITNESSES:
g/d?k
9
6
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
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96
INVENTOR:
Gill/2151166 757175171691:
Patented Apr. 5, 1938
is
2,113,129
as
PATENT IFFICE
2,113,129‘
I
‘
‘
TREATMENE OF WORK WITH SCILVENTS
Clarence F. Illnley, Detroit, Mich, ‘assignor, ‘by
mesne assignments, to Solvent Machine Com
pany, trustee, Detroit, Mich, a corporation or
> Michigan
Application May 15, 1934, Serial No.v 725,133
(UL 87-—6)
_ volume. the work must afterward be lightly
work with solvents for such purposes as clean
ing anddegreasing, and to the use of volatile
solvents; and especially to the cleaning of metal
5 parts in preparation for plating. For the pur
poses of the invention, various solvents whose '
vapors are heavier than air are especially ad- .
vantageous, such as benzine, benzol, and chic
rinated solvents like carbon tetrachloride, tri
110 chloromethane, tetrachloromethane, .dichloreth
ane, tetrachlorethane, trichlorethylene, and tet
rachlorethylene, whose vapors are unin?am
mable. In thus cleaning such metal parts, it
is commonly most advantageous to treat them
cleaned in an electro-alkali cleaner.
Even so,
however, the time-required for the ?nal electro
alkali vcleaning is greatly reduced, production
can be increased, and there is considerable sav
ing of electrical energy.
'
'
Using this last procedure, I have found that
ii’ the work is not transferred from the chlorine
ated solvent treatment to the electro-alkali
cleaner right away, the residue left on its surface
after the chlorinated solvent treatment tends
to "set up”, thus becoming harder to remove‘
in the electro-alkali cleaner bath. This is be
cause the water of condensation, which unavoid
15 mainly in boiling liquid solvent, rather than in the
ably collects in a layer'on the top of the chlo
solvent vapor, and to minimize the vapor layer rinated solvent bath, “water-spots” the work.
above the liquid solvent as far as possible; al
However, I have discovered that by a small pro
though in some cases the work may be satis
tective addition to the chlorinated solvent bath,
factorily cleaned in the solvent vapor, without as of fat like lard or tallow, this can be over
20 immersion in liquid solvent or spraying there
come: i. e., the lard or tallow coats the work 20
with, orthe like. My novel apparatus for such cleaned in the bath of boiling chlorinated sol
workaccomplishes the treatment in a very sim
vent in'a very thin film, and the water on the
' ple, compact, and convenient manner.
In cer
tain aspects my apparatus may be regarded as
25 an improvement of that disclosed in my Patent
No. 1,942,355, granted January 2, 1934.
bath cannot penetrate‘ this ?lm and spot the .
work when the latter is removed from the bath
of chlorinated solvent.
25
In the drawings, Fig. I is a side view of one
In preparing metal parts for plating, their , form of apparatus for the purposes of my in
surfaces are buiied with stearic bumng com- _ vention.
pounds (comprising abrasive like pumice and
80 rouge mixed with grease such as tallow) ,-—which
reduces the unevenness of their surfaces,-and
then precleaned. One way of precleaning is to
dry-buff or “color" the work: this, however, is
laborious, and entails hand scrubbing to remove
35 bu?lng compound and lint from the crevices, if
the work has retentive crevices. Anothermethod
of-.:precleaning is by electro-alkali ,cleaner, fol
lowed by hand scrubbing. Still another method
is to preclean in a heated oleaginous solvent,
40 like gasoline, benzine, etc., and then in an electro
alkali cleaner. This method involves consider
able loss of solvent, and serious fire hazard,
although in itself fairly successful.
By precleaning with chlorinated solvents in
45 accordance with my invention, such operations
as hand coloring and hand scrubbing are avoided,
as well as the ?re hazards of in?ammable sol
vents like gasoline, benzine, etc. My method is
also very economical, reducing the loss of sol
50 vent. When the chlorinated solvent is kept free
of water and fairly clean, use of an electro
alkali cleaner is unnecessary; but when it be
comes substantially contaminated with the mat
ter removed from the work in cleaning, so that
65 contamination amounts to as much as 15% by
Fig. II shows atransverse section through the
apparatus 01' Fig. I, taken as indicated by the 30
line and arrows II—II in Fig. I.
Fig. III is a side view of another form ‘of
apparatus, partly'in vertical mid-section.
Fig. IV is a plan view of the apparatus shown
in Fig. III.
'
_
35
Fig. V shows a, horizontal section taken as
indicated by the line and arrows V—V in Fig.
III;
and.
'
.
Fig. VI is a fragmentary sectional view on
a larger scale than Figs. III-V, taken as indi
cated by the line and arrows VI-VI in Fig. IV.
The apparatus shown in Figs. I and II com
prises a treating vessel or enclosure I 0 open
upward for the introduction and removalv of
the things or work to be treated, but closed to
exclude air and retain the solvent vapor. The
enclosure or casing l0 forms a tunnel-like cham
ber with upward sloping entrance and exit ends
I I and i2, and an approximately horizontal mid
body l3; and its lower portion serves as a tank
or vat for the liquid‘solvent. Along the upper
portion of the casing i0 is an (overhead) con
veyor 15 for the articles or work, which con-g’
veyor I5 is 'here shown as comprising a two
rail track l6, l6, (of angle sections) and a plu
55
2
9,118,129
rality oi double-roller trolley carriers l1, pro
vided with supporting means such as trays I3,
for carrying the articles or‘ work through the
treating chamber l0. Means may be provided
for moving the trolleys I‘! along the track l6
at suitable intervals, such as a conveyor chain
20, some of whose links may be pivoted together
by the trolley roller axes or spindles 2|. The
conveyor l5 may in practice form part of the
general conveyor system of a plant or plant
department where the apparatus is used. At
the upward-sloping open casing ends ll, l2, the
track l6, l5 likewise bends and slopes upward.
Between the end openings at ll, l2, the casing
top or r001’ 22 is closed except for a longitudinal
trolley slot 23 between the angle tracks l5, N,
which are secured to upturned roof ?anges 24,
24 that coact with said angles i3, IE to form a
sort of monitor structure.
20
The lower mid-portion l3 oi.’ the casing l5‘
has means for heating and vaporizing (boiling)
the solvent, such as longitudinal steam pipes 25,
25 at either side thereof, below the path or sweep
of the conveyor carriers H. The heating means
25, 25 are high enough above the bottom of the
vessel at ill to afford a relatively tranquil settling
zone or sump therebeneath for dirt, lint, or other
matter from the work. As shown, the lower por
tion of the vessel III is contracted, with inward
30 sloping side walls at 26, 25, to form a reduced
longitudinal trough-like sump 21 ,for the sedi
ment between the heating pipes 25, 25, which
overlie the sloping bottom shoulders 26, 25. Sep
arate provision is made for heating the contents
of the settling zone or sump 21, as by means of a
steam jacket 23 on its bottom wall. The sump
21 has a drainage outlet from its low ‘point, con
trolled by a valve 29.
Accumulation of vapor in the‘apparatus to the
point of over?ow or escape from the open tun
nel ends at H, i2 and from the trolley slot 23 in
the roof 22 may be prevented by condensing the
vapor. As shown in Fig. II, part at least of the
condensing means may be interposed between the
work on the carriers I1 and the outer opening of
the roof-slot 23, so as to prevent access of solvent
vapor to the ‘slot 23. In the present instance,
there are two thin ?at cold-water Jacket sec
tions or units 30, 30, at opposite sides of the
trolley “shanks" which extend up through the
slot 23 and travel therein. The condensers 30, 30
need not be right up against the r001’ 22, but may
liquid solvent, the apparatus is ?lled with liquid
solvent about up to the level I, about 1/¢% 0! lard‘
or tallow or the like being preferably added to
the solvent. 'I'he'valve 29 is, of course, closed.
The heating pipes 25, 25 are supplied with steam,
while cold water is circulated through the cool
ing units 30, 30. No steam or heat is supplied to
the Jacket 28. The valves 29, 34, 31 are closed.
The liquid solvent is heated, by the pipes 25, 25,
and kept at a- suitable temperature for cleaning 10
the work. The vapor thus evolved is condensed
by the cooling units 30, 30, and thus kept from
rising above them, and from reaching the open
ings at H, I 2 and 23. When the liquid solvent
is hot enough, work may be passed through it 15
on the carriers I‘! by means of the conveyor
system l5, and cleaned by the solvent and wash
ing action of the liquid. Grease and oil dissolve
in the solvent, while solid particles of grit, buiilng
compounds, lint, or the like wash of! and settle 20
by gravity into the tranquil region or zone below
the heating pipes 25, 25,.where the liquid is not
boiling or being agitated by the heat. Thus such
matterv is kept out of the liquid circulation in
the vessel at ill, and has no chance to settle on 25
the ‘cleaned work, or to come in contact with it
and adhere to it. The solvent vapor condensed
by the condensers 30 runs down into the troughs
32 and over?ows back into the pool of hot solvent
in the vessel l0,--the valves 34 being closed.
30
It the work is to be cleaned with solvent vapor
instead 01’ by contact with liquid solvent, then
the solvent level will be about at I’, just below
the carrier trays l3.
When dirt and grease have accumulated in the 35
apparatus up to the pipes 25, or as much as
deemed desirable, the passage of work there
through is stopped, and the valves 34 are
opened,-the valves 23 and 31 still remaining
closed. The supplies of steam and of condens 40
ing water being continued, and hotter steam sup
plied if necessary, the solvent boils, and con
densate from the troughs 32 drains into the
storage tanks 35,- until all the solvent in the
apparatus has been thus puri?ed and stored in 45
these tanks,—excepting, of course, that below the
heating pipes 25. Thereupon steam may be
shut-oil! from the pipes 25 and turned into the
bottom jacket 23;’ and thus the distillation of
solvent may be continued and completed. when
all the solvent (or as much as desired) has thus
been puri?ed, the steam (and cooling water)
supply may be shut-oi! altogether, and the drain
_valve 29 may be opened to draw of! the accu
the carriers IT. The condenser sections 30, 30 mulated sludge of oil, grease, and dirt from the
(as here shown) be as low down in the casing
III as consists with their clearing the work on
may be supported and secured on brackets 3|, 3|
?xed to the casing sides, and may slope outward
toward the sides. Collecting troughs 32, 32 are
mounted on the casing sides under the outer
60 lower edges of the sections 33, 30, to catch the
dripping condensate. As shown, there are drain
liquid enough to be drawn o?.’ easily; and in this
' pipes 33 from the low points of the troughs 32,
cleaned mechanically, or washed out with any
controlled by valves 34, and delivering into (ex
ternal) liquid storage tanks 35 at either side of
65 the apparatus. Thus the puri?ed condensate is
collected by the troughs 32, 32 separate from the
solvent heated by the pipes 25, in which work
has been cleaned, and can be stored and kept
clean in ‘the tanks 35. From these tanks 35. the
70 solvent may be returned to the lower portionot
the apparatus through pipes 35 controlled by
valves 31.
A mode‘ of operation of this form of apparatus
is as follows:
76
~
It work is to be cleaned by immersion in hot
sump 21’. It desired, 0! course, a certain amount
of solvent may be left in this sludge, to make it
case it may not always be necessary to use the
heating jacket 23. The sump 21 and the interior
oi’ the A apparatus may. 05 course, be further
suitable solvent or other ?uid.
As shown in -
Fig. II, the solvent return pipes 36 from storage
tanks 35 open into the vessel i0 above the settling 65
zone in its lower portion, so that.puri?ed conden
sate from the tanks may be used for washing out
the settling’ zone. Thereafter the valve 23 is
closed, and the valves 31 are opened to return
the purified solvent into the apparatusywhere 70
upon the valves 34 and 31 are all closed; and
the apparatus is ready to restart operation as
, already described.
The apparatus shown in Figs. III-VI com
prises a treating vessel, tank, vat, or chamber 53 75
2,118,129
_'
3
‘
way around the jacket, where it terminates be
hind a baiiie 99. Water of condensation, etc., is
discharged from the jacket 96 through a pipe
of a hollow con?guration in plan, with outer shell
5i, inner shell 52, ‘and bottom 53, extending
around an inner space 54 within the shell 52,—
which space 54 may be provided with a bottom 55
I00.
.
0
and serve as a reservoir or storage tank for sol
Cooling water is circulated through the annu
vent. Near and. above the top of the vat 50 are
lar cooling jackets 56, 51, for the purpose of
chilling and condensing the solvent vapor evolv
double-walled cooling water jackets 56, 51, shown
ing from the hot liquid-solvent in the vat. For
the outer jacket 56,’ there are supply pipes IOI,
I0Iv which enter the Jacket at diametrically op 10
posite points close to its bottom, and discharge
pipes I02, I02 which are connected to the jacket
near its top, at diametrically opposite points mid
way between the pipesgIOI, IOI. For the inner
as forming upward extensions of the shell walls
1 5|, 52, but o?s'et outward and inward from them,
10 respectively. The apparatus may preferably have
a removable cover or lid '50 over its top, shown
as a metal plate whose margin engages an angle
?ange lip 59 on an outer upper shell wall 60, ex
tending above the jacket 56. In the cover 58
there may be a charging, or loading and unload
jacket 51, there is-a supply pipe I03 entering the 15
ing opening H, for the introduction and removal Jacket near its bottom and a diametrically oppo
site discharge pipe I04 connected to the jacket
near its top. These pipes I03, I04 extend down
of work into and from the vat 50. Work may
be carried along in a closed circuit through the
vat 50 by a moving conveyor or carrier 62, pref
20 erably mounted on the cover 50 and removable '
with it.
through the inner reservoir 54 and out across
through the vat 50 below the heating coils 90, 9|. 20
The solvent vapor condensing on the cool inner
walls of the jackets 56, 51 trickles down into
annular collecting troughs I06, I01 between the
The particular apparatus here illustrated is of
a circular design; its vat or chamber 50 is of
upper margins oi‘ the vat walls SI, 52 and the
an annular con?guration; and its workrconveyor
inner walls of the jackets. The bottoms of these 25
troughs I06, I01 are formed by angle rings I00,
I09 a?lxed to the inner and outer sides of the
"vat walls 5I, .52, and the jackets 56, "51 are at
tached to the outer margins of the anglcs.- ‘From
25 or carrier 62 revolves as a turntable. This revolv
ing carrier or turntable 62 is mounted on the
lower end of an upright shaft 63 which extends
up into an upper Journal bearing .64 on the cover
50, and down into a lower step bearing 65 mount
the troughs I06, I01, the condensed solvent ordi
30 ed on angle bars 66 ?xed across the interior of
the inner shell 52. The carrier 62 comprises an
angle bar rim 6'! and a diametrally extending
narily drains directly back into the vat 50
through holes H0, H0 in the trough walls 5|,
52, which are ordinarily .open, but can be closed
by means of screw plugs III, II2 as shown In
Fig. IV. When the holes IIO, IIO are closed, the 35
condensate can be drained from the troughs I06,
I01 into the inner‘ reservoir 54 through pipes
H3, H4 controlled by valves H5, H6. From the
reservoir 54, liquid solvent can be transferred or
returned to vat 50 through a pipe line 'I II, which 40
as here shown extends up above the jacket 56
and in through the upper (outer) shell wall 60,
and has interposed therein a (hand) pump II8
for pumping the liquid solvent over into the vat
50; a control valve H9; and a supply connection 45
channel 60 to which iswelded the carrier hub 69,
and whose ends are attached to angle bar chords
35 ‘I0, 10, whose ends are in turn fastened to the
rim 61. The carrier 62 maybe driven by an
(electric) motor ‘I3 mounted on the cover 56~
and connected by a variable speed belt drive ‘I4
and a worm reduction gearing 15 to an upright
40 shaft 16 which extends down through the cover
50 to a spur pinion ‘I‘l meshing with a spur gear
78 on the carrier shaft 53, between thecarrier
and the cover.
In the apparatus, the work may be supported
45 I by removable plating racks 00 whose supporting
~hooks 8i take into holes in the horizontal legs of
I20 with a control valve I2I. As here shown, one
angle brackets or stirrups 82 adjustably secured
to the outer angle-rim 61 of the carrier 62 by
screws 61a_extend_ing through vertical slots 61b
in the upright bracket legs, and taking into the
50
rim 61. Racks 00 with their charges of articles
to be plated may‘ be hung on the carrier stir
of the drain pipes H4 takeslinto the lower por
tion of the pipe line “I, so that the latter per
forms a double function.
_
In the outer vat wall 5|, there may be one or 50
more clean-out openings with removable covers
or doors I22 secured thereto with ?uid-tight
joints.
In ordinary operation, thellquid solvent in the
rups 82 and removed, one by one, as the stirrups
02 pass adjacent (beneath) the opening 6i. As
55 indicated in Figs. III and IV, each rack 00 com- Q vat 50, standing about atthe level L and con
if desired, is heated by the steam coils 90, 96,
and kept at a suitable temperature for cleaning
the work. The carrier 62 is driven by the mo~
tor 13 (through the change speed and reduction 60
gearing ‘I4, 15) at any suitable rate, such as 1/2
to 1% R. P. M., and the racks 80, previously
charged with-articles to be cleaned, are loaded.
8i already mentioned.
For‘heating the liquid solvent in vat 50 in ordi-,
nary operation, there are a couple of annular
steam pipes 90, 9! coiled around the vat at a
su?icient height above its bottom to allow a set
tling zone below for matter from the work. These
on the carrier and unloaded therefrom as the
pipes 90, 95 have steam supply connections 92,
99 at the rear of the apparatus (Fig. V), and
also discharge connections 90, 95. For heating
70 the contents of the vat 50 when below the level
of the coils 90, 9| (for cleaning out purposes),
the vat has a steam jacket 96 on its bottom,
with stays 91 thereacross for resisting the inter
nal pressure. Steam is supplied to the jacket
75 96 through a pipe 98 that extends about half
55
taining about I/,_,% of lard or tallow, or the like,
prises a vertical series of- horizontal bars 05
mounted on an upright center rod 86, and pro
vided with plating hooks 8?. The rod 06 has a
hook 853 at its upper end, by which the rack 80
60 can be handled-as well as the supporting hook
-
carrier stirrups 82 pass the cover opening 6 I. Be 65
tween loading and unloading, each rack 80 may
make one full revolution (or more) with the
The hot solvent drains and drys
carrier 62.
from the hot articles almost immediately as each
plating rack 80 is removed from the machine.
and the articles remain on the plating racks hot
and dry, ready for plating.
_}
The solid residues of, dirt- removed from the.
articles by the solvent, such as lint, grit, bu?lng
compound, settle to the bottom of the vat 50, 75
4
2,113,129
below the coils 90, 9!. When the accumulation
of such solids reaches the coils, cleaning of the
apparatus and of the solvent is advisable,—-since
the solvent has also become contaminated by the
solvent vessel or vat having a contracted lower
portion or sump, heating means for heating the
liquid solvent in the vessel located above and
aside from said sump,‘ condensing means at a
grease dissolved from the articles cleaned. For
this purpose, after steam has been temporarily
shut oil‘ from the coils 90, 9|, the drain holes
higher level of the vessel for condensing solvent
vapor evolved therein, and means for heating the
H0, H0 are closed with the plugs ill, H2, and
the valves H5, H6 in pipes H3, H4, are opened,
10 to allow the puri?ed condensate to drain from
troughs I06, I01 into reservoir 54. Steam hav
ing been re-admitted to the coils 90, 9|, solvent
5. In apparatus of the character described, for
treating things or work therein with volatile
' is distilled over into the reservoir 54 till its sur
face comes down to the coils,—-when, if desired,
15 steam is shut off from them and admited to bot
tom Jacket 96, and distillation continued till sub
stantially all solvent has been distilled over.
Then clean-out door(s) I22 are opened, and the
residue of oil, buillng compound, lint, etc. is re
moved from the bottom 01' the vat. The appa
ratus may then be restored to ordinary operat
ing condition (as explained above), the puri?ed
solvent pumped back from reservoir 54 into vat
50, and loss of solvent made up by addition oi’
25 fresh solvent, through cover opening 6| or con
nection H0.
Having thus described my invention, I claim:
1. Apparatus of the character described, for
treating articles or work with volatile solvent
30 whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a
solvent vessel or vat provided with means of
drainage from its bottom, heating means for
heating the liquid solvent therein located high
enough above the bottom of the vessel to afford
35 a settling zone for matter from the work below
said heating means, condensing means at a
contents of said sump.
-
solvent whose vapor is heavier than air, the com 10
bination of a treating vessel or chamber closed
and covered over to exclude air and retain the
solvent vapor, but open at its upper portion for
the introduction and removal of work and also
having a conveyor slot in its roof, an overhead 15
conveyor supported above said slot and includ
ing means extending down through the slot and
adapted to travel therein to carry work through
the chamber, and condensing means extending
along at either side of the path of said down 20.
ward-extending means and interposed between
the opening of said slot and the work carried by
the conveyor, and preventing access of the sol
vent vapor to said slot.
6. Apparatus of the character described, for
treating articles or work with volatile solvent
whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a sol
vent vat extending around an inner space, a
cover therefor apertured for the introduction
and removal of work into and from the vat, a 30
moving carrier beneath the cover for the work in
the
ing
for
the
vat, passing under the cover opening for load
and unloading therethrough, heating means
boiling the solvent in the vat located below
sweep of the carrier but high enough above 35
the bottom of the vat to a?'ord a settling zone
higher level of the vessel for condensing solvent
for matter from the work below said heating
vapor evolved therein, means for collecting and
means for storing the condensate, and returning
means, condensing means at a higher level of
the vat forcondensing solvent vapor evolved
therein, and means for heating the contents of 40
said settling zone of the vessel below said ?rst
mentioned heating means.
40 the stored condensate to said vessel above its
said settling zone, so that the puri?ed condensate
may be used for washing out said zone.
2. Apparatus of the character described, for
'7. Apparatus of the character described, for
treating articles or work with volatile solvent treating articles or work‘ with volatile solvent
45 whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a
solvent vessel or vat having a contracted lower solvent vat extending around a central space, a
portion or sump provided with means of drain
cover therefor apertured for the introduction and
age at its bottom, heating means in the vessel removal of work into and from the vat, a mov
located'above and aside from said sump high ing carrier beneath the cover for the work in the
50' enough above the bottom of the vessel to afford vat, passing adjacent the cover opening for load
a settling zone for matter from the work below ing and unloading therethrough, and condensing
said heating means, condensing means‘ at a means for the solvent vapor in the central space
higher level of the vessel for condensing solvent to the inside of the vat below the cover.
vapor evolved therein, means for collecting and
8. Apparatus of the character described, for
55 storing the condensate, and means for returning treating articles or work with volatile solvent
the stored condensate to said vessel above its said _whose vaporiis heavier than air, comprising a
sump, so that the puri?ed condensate may be solvent vat extending around a central space, a
used for washing out said sump.
cover therefor apertured for the introduction and
3. Apparatus of the character described, for removal of work into and from the vat, a moving
60 treating articles or work with volatile solvent
carrier beneath the cover for the work in the
whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a vat, passing adjacent the cover opening for load
solvent vessel or vat having a contracted lower ing and unloading therethrough, and condensing
portion or sump provided with means of drain
means for the solvent vapor in the central space
age at its bottom, heating means for heating the within and below the sweep of said moving
liquid solvent in the vessel above said sump, con- carrier.
densing means at a higher level of the vessel for
9. Apparatus of the character described, for
condensing solvent vapor evolved therein, means treating articles or work with volatile solvent
for collecting and storing the condensate, means whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a
‘for returning the stored condensate to said ves
solvent vat extending around a central space, a
sel above its said sump, so that the puri?ed con
cover therefor apertured for the introduction and
densate may be used for, washing out said sump removal of work into and from the vat, a moving
and means for heating the contents of said sump. carrier beneath the cover for the work in the
4. Apparatus of the character described, for
treating articles. or work with volatile solvent
whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a
vat, passing adjacent the cover opening for load
ing and unloading therethrough, condensing
means for the solvent vapor in the central space
45
.
55
60
65
5
2,118,120
to the inside of the vat below the cover, and
condensing means at the outer side of the vat
at said cover opening.
-
10. Apparatus of the character described, for
13. Apparatus oi the character described, for
treating articles or work with volatile solvent
whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a
solvent reservoir and a circumjacent solvent vat
treating articles or work with volatile solvent
whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a
solvent vat extending around a central space, a
cover therefor apertured for the introduction and
on the cover at its lower side and removable with
removal of work into and from the vat, a moving
and by the cover, means for condensing below
10 carrier beneath the cover for the work in the
vat, passing adjacent the cover opening for load
with outer wall higher than its inner wall, a re
movable cover over said vat and reservoir, a
moving carrier for the work in the vat mounted
the cover the solvent vapor evolving from the 10
ing and unloading therethrough, condensing
vat. with drainage of the condensate into said
reservoir, and means for pumping the condensed
means for the solvent vapor in the central space
within and below the sweep of said moving car
solvent from said reservoir back into the vat. ' '
14. A method 0!. cleaning articles or work in a
vessel with volatile solvent whose vapor is heavier 15
rier, and condensing means above the vat at
said cover opening, outside the sweep of said
moving carrier.
11. Apparatus of the character described, for
treating articles or work with volatile solvent
whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a
than air, accumulating matter from the work in
the vessel while avoiding contamination of work
with the accumulated matter, and periodically
distilling the used solvent. allowing the vessel to
be cleaned out, and recovering the solvent, free 20
solvent reservoir and a circumjacent solvent vat
of the accumulated matter; which method com
with outer wall higher than its inner wall,-a
prises heating and vaporizing the liquid solvent
cover over said vat and reservoir apertured for
the introduction and removal of work into and
from the vat, a moving carrier beneath the cover
in the vessel at a zone or level su?lciently above
the bottom of the vessel, during the ordinary
operation of cleaning the work, to provide a
2a
for the work in the vat, passing adjacent the
tranquil settling zone tor the accumulation 0!
cover opening for loading and unloading there
through, and means for condensing, below the
matter irom the work in the lower portion of _
cover but above the reservoir, the solvent vapor
30 evolving from the vat, with drainage of the con
densate into said reservoir.
,
12. Apparatus of the character described, for
treating articles or work with volatile solvent
whose vapor is heavier than air, comprising a sol
vent reservoir and a circumjacent solvent vat
with outer wall higher than its inner wall, a cover
over said vat and reservoir apertured for the in
troduction and removal of work into and from
‘the vat, means for condensing, below‘the cover
40 but above the reservoir, the solvent vapor evolv
ing from the vat, with drainage of the condensate
into said reservoir, and means for pumping the
condensed solvent from said reservoir back into
the vat.
the vessel, while condensing the solvent vapor
evolved by the heating of the solvent at a higher
level of the vessel than said heating zone; clean 30
ing work in the vessel, while matter therefrom
accumulates in the settling zone; and as the
accumulation of settled matter substantially
reaches the heating zone, discontinuing the clean
ing of work and- distilling of! the solvent from 35
said settling zone: while condensing the solvent
vapor evolved and collecting and storing the pu
rifled liquid condensate separate from the used
liquid solvent in the vessel, continuing the dis
tillation until the used liquid solvent is boiled 40
away, and then discontinuing the distillation and
removing the residue from the vessel.
CLARENCE F. DINLEY.
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