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Патент USA US2113430

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lApril 5, 1938.
` w. J. KENNEDY
2,113,430
COIN CONTROL MECHANISM
Filed vMarch 26, 1957
4 Sheets-Sheet l
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ATTO
EY
April 5, 1938.
w. J. KENNEDY
2,113,430
COIN CONTROL MECHANISM
Filed March 26, 1957
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
April V5, 1938.
w. J. KENNEDY‘ v
2,113,430
COIN CONTROL MECHANI SM
Filed March 2e, 1957
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^ April 5, 1938.
w. J. KENNEDY
‘
2,113,430
COIN CONTROL MECHANISM
Filed March 26, 1937
4 Sheets-Sheet 4
2,113,430
Patented Apr. 5, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,113,430
COIN-CONTROL MECHANISM
William J. Kennedy, Hollis, N. Y.
Application March 26, 1937, Serial No. 133,102
17 Claims. (Cl. 23S-32)
This invention relates to coin-controi mecha-nism for machines or apparatus designed to be
used or operated upon the payment of a fee. usu
ally a coin of a certain value, inserted in a slot
in the casing of the machine. Included with this
class of slot machines, may be mention-ed turn
stiles, radio sets, phonographs, games oi various
kinds, picture exhibiting machines, vending ma
chines and the like.
The invention embraces a number of features
which are readily adaptable for use in change~
making, counting, adding and like machines, han
dling money in coin `form.
In showing the invention applied, I have, as a
matter of convenience, embodied it in a form
suitable for use in connection with a turnstiic but
it is to be understood, that this showing is not in
20
tended, in any way, as limiting the invention to
this particular use and is merely illustrative of one
of the many uses for which the invention may be
adapted.
In fare collecting turnstiles, as in various other
coin-controlled, machines, a suitable device is em
ployed to prevent operation until the required
coin has been deposited. After the deposit of the
coin, the patron or operator actuates a movable
member, such, for example, as the rotatable bar
rier of the turnstile, which, through the inserted
coin, is brought into relation to act, either di
rectly or indirectly, upon the aforesaid device, to
put the machine in condition for operation.
Attempted actuation of the above mentioned
movable member, without first inserting the re
quired coin, ordinarily has no effect upon the
~ machine and in turnstiles, results only in the
rotatable barrier checking against 'further rota
tion, after it has been advanced a very short dis
tance and has reached the end of its allowable
free movement.
40
_
The turnstile barrier is purposely left free for
a short advance movement, to obtain motion nec»
essary to actuate the coin finder of the coin
ent classes of fares, ~for which they issue coin
shaped disks oi different diameters, requires that 5
provision be made in the control mechanism oi a
fare collecting turnstile, for handling a variety
of coins and/or disks‘and for making them all
effective for releasing the turnstile. It is iup
thermore required that the different classes of
fares be separately registered and totalized and
that the inserted coins and/or disks, represent
ing such fares, be rapidly ejected, distributed and
deposited in separate receptacles Within the ma
15
chine casing.
To meet these requirements, my improved
mechanism, in its present embodiment, provides
a common entrance passage for nickels-_thc reg
ular fare, transfer disks of larger diameter than
nickels and token disks~a reduced fare, of larger
diameter than transfer disks.
I further provide a coin ñndcr common to the
three types of fare disks mentioned, Which is
adapted to advance them along a common path,
in Which their travel is checked, according to their
diameters, at diiîerent points therein. As each
coin reaches its limit of travel in the common
path, it engages and is held until ejection. by a
spring-advanced selector, which action imparts
movement to the selector, increasing the tension
of its spring and shifting a selector member into
engaging relation with a member of its counter
which is subsequently actuated to register the
fare coin or disk engaged by its selector. As the
mechanism is designed to handle three classes of
fares, three selectors are employed, each with its
counter, so that each class is separately regis
tered. After a fare is registered, ejection of the
coin or disk follows and is brought about by with
drawing the support from under the coin or disk,
permitting the 'tensioned selector, by which the
If
coin or disk is held, as above described, to act and
speed the discharge. To save the time and labor
ci sorting the ejected coins and/or disks, they are
a coin is present, it is engaged and advanced by
the finder and, in my improved mechanism, the
' g their discharge, according to the class oí fares
control mechanism, for the purpose of determin
ing whether or not a coin has been inserted.
coin, in its advance, imparts movement, 'through
a suitable connection, to the turnstile barrier lock,
releasing the same and freeing the machine for
The turnstile having been freed and put into
operation, it remains to register Y‘ne inserted coin
by means of a suitable counter and thereafter
eject and deposit the coin.
automatically distributed and deposited, follow
This could be accom
plished by a comparatively simple mechanism
45
v represent. This is accomplished by means
trate coin chutes, leading `_from the several
points of discharge to separate receptacles Within
, casing of the machine.
operation.
55
that would meot all requirements, Where 'the coins
used are all alike but, present day practice of
transportation companies in establishing diner"
50
in the accompanying drawings, I have illustrated a form of coin-control mechanism suitable
for carrying my invention into effect but do not
Wish to be understood as intending to limit myself
to either the form or details shown, as various 55
2
2,113,430
changes may be made therein within the scope
of the invention as outlined in the appended
claims.
In the drawings
Fig. l is a view in elevation, showing mainly
the fare-registering assemblage of the coin-con
trol mechanism.
Fig. 2 is a similar View with the registering
counters removed to show the coin selectors
through which the counters are operated. The
selector at the left is shown shifted by an inserted
coin (indicated in dotted lines) into position to
operate its counter. The coin represented is the
nickel cash fare, which is of smaller diameter
than 'the transfer and token disks used.
Fig. 3 is a view in elevation of the mechanism
from the side opposite that illustrated in Figs. l
and 2, with portions of the body plate broken
away to show the coin gauge and selector studs
In this view the mecha
nism is shown in normal position or inactive.
Fig. 4 is a similar view showing the mechanism
in operation after a transfer disk has been in
en in the coin guideway.
serted, which is of the intermediate diameter used.
The coin-finder is shown in position after it has
advanced the disk (indicated in dotted lines) to
the point where further advance has been stopped
by the coin gauge in the guideway and the coin
has been moved under and raised the selector
stud against the action of its spring. Thus po
sitioned, the coin is held by the tensioned selec
tor stud until it is registered and ejected.
Fig. 5 is a vertical section on the line S5-S5,
of Fig. 3, in which various parts have been omitted
for clearness of illustration. The view illustrates,
mainly, the coin ejector and distributor and
shows the ejector after it has been shifted from
an adjusted position, shown in Fig. 6, in which
it supports the coin, back to normal position, in
which its support for the coin is withdrawn and
the distributor is positioned to receive the coin
as it is ejected.
Fig. 6 is a similar view showing the position
of the ejector and distributor as a coin is being
advanced in the coin guideway by the coin-ñnder.
Fig. 7 is a View in elevation looking at the left
side of the mechanism, as viewed in Fig. 3, show
ing the same in normal or inactive position.
Fig. 8 is a transverse section through the coin
guideway, and
Fig. 9 is a top plan View, with the casing re
moved, showing the barrier-positioning and lock
ing mechanism of a four-arm turnstile and the
connections from the same to the coin-control
mechanism shown in the other ñgures of the
drawings.
Referring now to the drawings, I represents a
common entrance passage for coins, and/or metal
disks; 2, representing different classes of fares
and distinguishable one from the other, usually,
by size (diameter), color and lettering.
Forming a continuation of the entrance passage
and angularly disposed thereto, there is a coin
guideway which the coin enters on leaving the
entrance passage and comes to rest on a seat
formed by the extended left-hand wall 3 of the
entrance passage, as viewed in Figs. 3 and 4, and
a cross pin 4 in the guideway. This coin seat, in
the present embodiment of the invention, is de
signed to serve for the three classes of coins or
fare disks mentioned above.
At the left of the seated coin, again as viewed
in Figs. 3 and 4, and projecting into the coin
guideway, there is a lug 5 of an arm 6, which
75 latter will be hereinafter termed the coin-finder.
The coin-ñnder is pivoted at 1, to have for
ward and backward movement about its pivot and
the coin guideway is given the curved form of an
arc, struck from the coin-finder pivot as a center.
(See Figs. 3 and 4.)
U
As best shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the curved
guideway for the coin is formed between two
sheet metal body plates 8 and 9, which are suit
ably spaced apart to admit passage of the coins
in a restricted path between them and to the 10
right of the cross pin 4, as viewed in Figs. 3 and 4,
the guideway is normally open at the bottom, for
a purpose to be later on explained.
The top of the guideway is closed by a plate I0,
secured between the two body plates 8 and 9, and 15
shaped to serve as a coin gauge, to check move
ment of the coins at different points in the guide
way, according to their diameters.
As shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the coin gauge plate
I Il, is provided with three shoulders II, I2 and
I3, positioned to engage and check movement
in the guideway at different points, of coins of
the three different diameters, for which the
mechanism is designed.
The body plate 8 (see Figs. 3 and 4), is slotted,
as indicated at I4, in line with the curved guide
way, to permit free forward and backward move
ment of the lug 5 of the coin-finder therein.
Assuming that a coin of the intermediate di
ameter is inserted in the entrance passage and 30
comes to rest on the seat at the left-hand end
of the coin guideway, as viewed in Figs. 3 and 4.
If now, the coin-finder is actuated, its lug, en
gaging the coin, will advance it toward the right
along the guideway, until the coin strikes the in- ‘
termediate shoulder I2 of the coin gauge, and
its further motion along the guideway will be
checked and it will remain held at this point be
tween the shoulder of the gauge and the lug of the
coin-finder until it is registered and ejected in 40
a manner to be later described.
`
We have the same operation, as above described,
for the larger and the smaller coins or disks but
with this difference, the larger coin will travel a
shorter distance in the guideway, as will be ap 45
parent from the position of the shoulder II of
the coin gauge and the smaller coin will travel
the full length of the guideway.
When coin mechanism such as we have here
is in use, it frequently happens that several coins 50
are inserted in the entrance passage by a person
paying for himself and others accompanying him
and in order to prevent the mechanism from be
ing blocked or jammed, after the coin-finder has
advanced the ñrst coin along the guideway, the 55
coin-finder is provided in the rear of the lug 5
with a lip or flange I5, which is given the curva
ture of the guideway and as the coin-finder moves
forward to advance the first coin along the guide
way, its lip or ñange rides under the entrance 60
passage and provides a closure for the lower end
thereof, holding the other coins in the passage
until the coin-ñnder makes its full return move
ment, when the next coin drops down on the seat
and the above described operation is repeated, 65
so that entrance to the guideway will be closed
when the mechanism is in operation and will re
main closed until each operation is completed.
To reduce friction and ease and steady the
70
motion of the coin-ñnder, a roller I8, is pro
vided and mounted thereon to ride on the face
of the body plate 8, and to provide a deñnite stop
for the coin-finder on its return movement, a
rearward extension is employed which terminates 75
Ad
3.
2,113,430
in a bent-up end I1, shaped to engage the edge
of the body plates, as best shown in Fig. 7.
The coin-finder is given both forward and
Ul
backward movement by an actuating arm I8,
mounted to turn about the same pivot 1, as the
coin-finder and connected to it by a spring I9
(see Figs. 3 and 4).> Through this spring the
actuating arm I8 gives motion to the coin-finder
but is- free to move independently of the coin
ñnder, in opposition to the spring. In other
words, the actuating arm I8, must make a full
forward stroke in each operation of the mecha.
nism, for reasons which will appear later on and,
conected through a link 30 to operate the
counter 3 I.
It will be observed that in the figure of the
drawings referred to (Fig. 2), the rod 25 of the
selector at the left, has been shifted into posi Ul
tion to engage the stud 21 of its cooperating
sector 2B, while the rods of the other selectors
are in normal position or clear of the studs of
their sectors. This shifting of the rod at the left,
was brought about by a selected coin, indicated l. 0
in dotted lines, in the guideway, engaging and
raising the stud of selector arm at the left, there
by rocking the arm, and dropping the rod to the
as the-coin-finder is subject to being checked at
points short of its full stroke by the larger and
position shown.
vAv coin or disk having been inserted and ad
vanced by the coin-finder, as above described, the
next step is to register the same before it is
With the parts positioned as shown and de
scribed, it only remains to move the slotted bar
lengthwise, to cause the rod at the left, to en
gage the sector stud and give the sector the neces
sary limited rotary movement to pull down on
the link and operate the counter, which opera
tion registers the selected coin before it is ejected.
The bar 28 has a separate slot formed therein
for each of the rods 25, and as the bar is moved
ejected.
lengthwise, it gives simultaneous motion to -the
intermediate diameter coins or disks, a yielding
connection, such as is provided by the spring` I9,
isr required to permit independent movement oi
these cooperating members.
Provision is made in the present embodiment
of ythe invention for registering each of the
three classes of fares the mechanism is de
signed to handle, on a separate counter, so vthat
the total for each class may be instantly read by
a glance at the exposed faces of the counters.
It may be mentioned at the outset, that the
registering devices for the three classes of fares
several rods and the rod that is shifted downward ‘
by a selected coin, gives motion to its sector and
through the connection described, operates its
counter.
The righthand end of the slotted bar 26 (Fig. 2)
moves in a guide 32, and the lefthand end is pro- 1
vided with an opening for a projecting stud 33 of
are identical and are so constructed and ar
must complete its operation, before either of the
others can be actuated.
the stud-connected bar 26, yieldingly maintains
ranged, that only one can operate at a time and
_
`In separately registering the three classes of
fares, I employ a coin or disk selector for each
counter, which is so positioned, as to respond only
tov one class of fares, the selection depending upon
the diameter of the coin or disk.
Each selector (see Fig. 2) consists of a cen
trally pivoted arm 20, turning on a fixed pin 2|,
projecting from the body plate 9. The arm 20
bi)
a spring-retracted arm 34, mounted on the op
posite side of the body plates. The stud pro
jects through a slot 35 in the body plates and the
retractile spring 36 of the arm 34, acting through I
is provided at the lower end with a stud 22 (see
Fig. 5), which projects through a slot 23 in the
body plate 9, and on into the coin guideway, at
a point adjacent one of the shoulders of the coin
gauge Ill therein.
A spring 24, acting on the arm 20, normally
maintains the stud 22, at the lower end of the slot
23, and, in this position, the stud will be engaged,
moved upward and held by each coin advanced in
the guideway by the finder which is of the di
ameter of the class of fares the counter of the
particular selector is intended to register.
The upward movement imparted to the selector
by the selected coin or disk, serves two impor
tant purposes. The selector and its associated
counter are, normally, disconnected, as is best
shown in Fig. 2, and one purpose served is to
bring a member of the selector into cooperative
relation. with a member of its counter for subse~
quent operation of the latter, in a manner to be
described. The other purpose served is to in
." crease the tension of the selector arm, to make it
available for use in speeding the ejection of the
» coin, as will also be described.
Again referring to Fig. 2, it will be seen that
each of the selector arms 20, has pivoted at its
upper end, a downwardly extending rod 25, the
lower end of which is normally held by a slotted
bar 26, slightly to the left and clear of a stud 21,
carried by a spring-retracted sector 28. The
sector 28 is mounted to turn about a fixed stud
7:5
shaft 29, projecting from the body plate 9, and is
the rods 25 in their normal position, that is to
say, disconnected from the operating devices of
the counters.
Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, the arm 34 is shown 40
mounted on a stud shaft 31, ñxed to the body plate
8. The lower free end of the arm` 34, is provided
with a downwardly projecting tooth 3B, which is
designed to be engaged by a spring-retracted pawl
39, carried by the actuating arm I8 of the coin
finder.
On each forward stroke of the coin-finder actu«
ating arm I8, in which it moves from the position
shown in Fig. 3 to the position shown in Fig. e.
the pawl 39, carried thereby, engages but yields
and rides under the tooth 38 of the arm 34, with«
out giving motion to the arm. On the return or
back stroke of the actuating arm, the pawl, again
engaging the tooth of the arm 34, will continue
in engagement therewith long enough to impart
the necessary motion to the arm 34, to move the
above described slotted bar 26, in the direction of
its length and so give motion to the several
selector rods 25, one of which will be positioned
to actuate the sector with which it cooperates and 60
cause registration by the counter of the selected
coin, as previously explained.
The inserted coin having been registered by the
proper counter for its class of fares, the next
65
step is to eject the coin.
It has been explained that beyond the coin
seat at the lower end of the entrance passage, the
coin guideway, along which the coin is advanced
by the ñnder, is normally o-pen at the bottom, as
70
shown in Fig. 5.
Below the coin guideway, the body plates 8
and 9 are cut away to provide clearance for an
arm 40, which is pivotally mounted on a -short
cross shaft 4I, and is shaped at its upper end 42,
to servev as a bottom for the coin guideway.
75
4
2,113,430
'I'he lower end 43 of the arm 4B and an exten~
sion 44 on the actuating arm i8, of the coin
flnder, are shaped to cooperate as cams and act,
when the mechanism is in normal position or in
active, to maintain the arm 4U with its upper
shaped end, clear of the open bottom of the coin
guideway, as best shown in Fig. 5, and also shown
in elevation in Fig. 8,
Above the cross shaft 4|, the arm 40 is pro
vided with a second cam 45, and the actuating
arm i8 of the coin-iinder, is similarly provided
With a second cam 46. These cams 45 and 46,
stand in close relation but disengaged when the
mechanism is in normal position or inactive.
As will be evident, the purpose of the two sets
of cams above described, is to rock the arm 40,
and maintain the shaped end thereof in or out of
bottoming relation with the coin guideway.
The disengagement of the lower set of cams
43 and 44, and the engagement of the upper set
45 and 46, occurs a moment or so after the coin
finder actuating arm begins to move on its for
ward stroke and thus shifts the shaped upper
end of the arm 40 from the position shown in
Fig. 5, to the position shown in Fig. 6, so as t0
provide a bottom for the coin guideway before
an inserted coin is advanced therein by the coin
finder.
Once shifted, as above described, the upper
30 shaped end of the arm 40, is maintained by the
cams in bottoming relation with the coin guide
way, while the actuating arm of the coin-finder
completes its forward stroke and returns almost
to its normal position, then the upper cams dis
engage and the lower cams re-engage and rock
the arm 4U, withdrawing the upper shaped end
clear of the coin guideway and opening the same
for the release and ejection of the coin.
As will be apparent, the withdrawal of the
40 bottom of the coin guideway would be sufficient
in itself to bring about gravitational discharge
of the coin therein but quicker action is desirable
and I accordingly utilize the tensioned ejector
stud, under which the coin is held in the guide
way, to speed up the discharge and eject the coin.
As indiscriminate ejection of coins and/or
disks, representing different classes of fares,
would necessitate subsequent sorting, I provide
for distributing and depositing the coins and/or
disks, according to their class, in separate re
ceptacles.
Formed on or attached to the upper part of
the arm 40, above the cross shaft and on the
side opposite the cams, there are three coin
chutes 41, 48 and 49, arranged in line with the
selectors above, in the coin guideway. As a coin
or disk is ejected by any one of the three selectors,
mechanism may be readily adapted for use on
machines and apparatus of various kinds, de
signed for operation upon the payment of a fee
and for a convenient showing of the application
of the invention, I have selected a well known
form of turnstile such as is used to bar an en
trance passage and is normally locked against
operation.
Referring to Fig. 9, the essential parts of the
turnstile mechanism are shown, with the casing
removed, for clearness of illustration.
As there shown, the turning axis of the four
arm rotatable barrier 50 of the turnstile, is in
dicated at 5|. The ratchet wheel 52, fast to and
movable with the barrier and the spring-ad
vanced pawl 53, engaging the ratchet, constitute
the “back-lock”, to prevent reverse movement
of the barrier. The disk 54, also fast to and mov
able with the barrier, is peripherally shaped to
provide four equi-spaced stop-shoulders 55, 55 #_
etc., and has mounted upon it four equi-spaced
rollers 56, 56 etc. Cooperating with the rollers
56, in pairs, there is a spring-advanced lever 51,
pivoted at 58, which acts in the well known man
ner to position the barrier, with one of its arms
across the entrance passage the turnstile con
trols.
Cooperating in the usual manner with the stop
yshoulders 55, 55 etc., there is a spring-advanced
locking pawl 59, pivoted at 50. The pawl is nor
30
mally spaced away, a slight distance, from the
stop-shoulder it is positioned to engage and this
clearance permits limited free rotary movement
of the barrier, which is utilized to operate a. coin
ñnder. If no coin is present, the stop-shoulder
55, engages the end of the locking pawl 59, and 35
checks further forward rotary movement of the
barrier. If a coin has been inserted, the coin
ñnder advances the coin and through connec
tions to be described, imparts the necessary mo 40
tion to the locking pawl 59, to move it about its
pivot, clear of the advancing stop-shoulder, per
mitting continued rotation of the barrier as re
quired for a complete operation of the turnstile.
The effect of continued rotation of the barrier
is to cause the roller 56, engaging the outer free
end of the positioning lever 51, to ride under
the lever and give it motion towards the right,
about its pivot, in opposition to its heavy retractile
spring. As the roller 56, passes the high point 6|
of the cam face of the positioning lever, Which is in
the dead center line of the barrier axis, the re
tractile spring acts, forcing the positioning lever
in the reverse direction, towards the left and
driving the roller before it, thereby continuing
the clockwise rotation of the barrier, under the
power of the retractile spring of the positioning
it enters the chute on the arm 40, designed to re
ceive the class of fares represented by the coin lever, until the turnstile ‘completes its operation.
The above described back and forth movement
and, on leaving the chute of the arm 40, the coin
given the positioning lever, is utilized to impart 60
enters a. ñxed continuation of the same, indicated
in dotted lines in Figs. 1 and 2, and is carried like movement, in reverse direction, to the actu
ating arm i8, of the coin-control mechanism.
by the extension chute and deposited in a suit
This motion is transmitted through a link 62 from
able receptacle, not shown, usually located with
in the casing of the machine the coin mechanism the positioning lever to a lever 63, pivoted at 64,
and connected by a link 65, with the lower endl 65
is employed to control.
By means of this arrangement, the coins and/or of the actuating arm I8 of the coin-finder.`
disks are distributed and deposited, according to Through the connection described, rearward
the class of fares to which they belong, and as movement of the positioning lever to the right,
70 the number deposited in each receptacle appears during the first eighth of a revolution of the turn
on the counters, it only remains for the collector stile barrier, causes the coin-finder to advance 70
to separately bag the coins and/or disks, note the coin in the ‘coin guideway and as the move
ment of the positioning lever is reversed during
the number of each and his work is done.
As pointed out in the preliminary statement the second eighth of a revolution of the turnstile
barrier, the coin-iinder is caused to return to
75 of invention, the above described coin-control normal
position.
75
5
2,113,430
~It will be seen that continued rotation of the
turnstile barrier, beyond its free initial move
ment, depends upon the instant withdrawal of
the locking pawl 59, from engaging relation with
the stop-shoulders 55, of the disk 54. To bring
about such release of the barrier, I cause each
coin and/or disk, in the first part of its ad»
vance by the ñnder, to impart the necessary
movement, through a connection, now to be de
10 scribed, to shift the locking pawl, as required,
to release the barrier and permit operation of the
turnstlle.
- Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, a diagonally disposed
shaft 66 is shown, mounted in suitable bearings
61, 61, on the body plate 8. Near the upper end,
a. short arm 68 is made fast to the shaft and its
free end projects into the guideway in the path
of 'coins and/or disks advanced therein by the
coin-finder. A spring 69 encircling that portion
20 of the shaft between the arm and the upper bear
ing, acts to yieldingly maintain the arm 68 posi
tioned as above described.
On the lower end of the shaft 66, projecting
beyond the lower bearing 61, a curved arm 1D
25 is made fast, with its outer free end normally in
engaging relation with a pin ll, projecting up
ward from the lower end of the barrier-locking
pawl 59.
In operation-«as an inserted coin or disk is
30 given movement by the coin-finder, in advancing
it in the guideway, the coin or disk engages the
free end of the arm 68, and as the advance of
the coin is continued, it forces the arm outward,
thereby giving motion to the diagonally disposed
35 shaft 66, which, in turn, moves the curved arm
10, carried at its lower end, causing the free
end of the curved arm to exert sufficient pressure
on the pin 1|, to swing the barrier-locking pawl
59 about its pivot, clear of the notched disk 54,
40 and release the barrier for operation of the turn
stile.
As the coin forces its way by and moves the
arm 68 outward, as above described, the coin
ñnder rides under the free end of the arm and
holds it clear of the coin guideway until the coin
`finder, on its return or back stroke clears the arm,
50
55
60
65
which is immediately swung into the guideway
and thus positioned, by the action of its spring
69, for engagement by the next coin or disk in
serted by a person operating the turnstile,
As the free end of the curved arm 10, at the
lower end of the. diagonally disposed shaft 66,
moves forward, in engagement with the pin 1I,
of the barrier-locking pawl, as above described,
it will be noted, that its movement is on a shorter
radius than that of the pin of the locking pawl
and this results in the pin 1|, riding off the free
end of the arm 68, and into engagement with the
inner curved edge thereof, as indicated by dotted
lines in Fig. 9. In thus causing the pin to shift
from the end to the inner edge of the arm, the
latter is relieved of the strain of further advanc
ing the locking pawl against the increasing ten
sion of its retractile spring and excessive move
ment of the pawl is` avoided.
As the operation and many important advan
tages of my improved control-mechanism will be
apparent from the foregoing, it will not be neces
sary to further describe the same.
70
Having described my invention, I claim:
l. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of different diameters,
a. coin-iinder adapted to advance inserted coins
of different diameters along a common path,
75 means in the path for limiting movement of the
coins along the same according to their diameters,
counters for registering the number oi coins ad
vanced by the finder, and a coin selector for each
counter, each coin selector being operatively dis
connected normally from its counter and respon
sive only to coins of a certain diameter.
2. In a coin-controlled mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of diiferent diameters, a
coin-finder adapted to advance inserted coins of
different diameters along a common path, means
in the path for limiting movement of the coins
along the same according to their diameters,
counters for registering the number of coins ad
vanced by the iinder, a selector for each counter
responsive only to coins of a certain diameter,
the said selectors adapted to be held under ten
sion by each coin selected, and means for utilizing
the tension of the selectors to eject the coins.
3. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of diiîerent diameters, 20
a coin-iinder adapted to advance inserted coins
of different diameters along a common path,
means in the path for limiting movement of the
coins along the same according to their diameters,
counters for registering the number of ‘coins ad
vanced by the iinder, and a coin selector for each
counter adapted to respond only to coins of a
certain diameter, said selectors each including
a spring-advanced member positioned to be en
gaged and put under increased tension b-y the f
selected coins, and means for utilizing the ten
sioned selectors to eject the coins.
4. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of different diameters, a
coin-ñnder adapted to advance inserted coins of I I
dilîerent diameters along a common path, means
in the path for limiting movement-of the coins
along the same according to their diameters,
counters for registering the number of coins
advanced by the finder, a coin selector for each 40
counter adapted to respond only to coins of a
certain diameter, said selectors each including
a spring-advanced member positioned to be en
gaged and put under increased tension by the
selected coins, means for utilizing the tensioned
selectors to eject the coins, and distributing
means for depositing the coins ejected by each
selector in a separate receptacle.
5. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance
passage for coins, a coin-länder movable to ad 50
vance inserted coins to the required point for
ejection, a counter for registering the number of
coins advanced by the ñnder, coin ejector means,
and a member operatively associated to actuate
the ñnder, counter and ejector by a single for
ward and back stroke.
55
6. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance
passage for coins, a coin-ñnder movable to ad
vance inserted coins to the point required for
discharge, a member movable from normal po 60
sition into position to support the coin in its
advance by the finder, and means for shifting
the member back to normal position to Withdraw
its support and permit gravitational discharge
of the coin.
'7. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance
passage for coins, a tensioned coin-ejector at a
point distant from the passage, a coin-finder
movable to advance inserted coins into engag
ing relation with the tensioned ejector, a mem
ber supporting the coin in its advance by the
finder, and means for shifting the member to
withdraw its support and permit the ejector to
discharge the coin.
8. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance 75
6
2,113,430
passage for coins, a coin-finder movable to ad
vance inserted coins to the point required for
discharge, an actuating arm for the coin ñnder,
a member pivotally mounted for movement at
right angles to the direction of movement of the
finder, cams on the member and on the actuat
ing arm of the finder cooperating to move the
member from normal position to support the
coin as the latter is advanced by the ñnder and
10 to subsequently shift the member back to nor
mal position to Withdraw its support and permit
gravitational discharge of the coin.
9. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance
passage for coins of different diameters, a coin
15 ñnder movable to advance inserted coins to dif
ferent points for discharge according to their
diameters, and a combined coin-supporting
member and distributor, the said member serv
ing as a support for the coins in their advance
20 by the iinder, and means for shifting the mem
ber to withdraw its support and move the dis
tributor into position to receive and distribute
the released coins according to their diameters.
10. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance
25 passage for coins, a coin-finder adapted to ad
vance inserted coins to the point required for
ejection, an actuating arm for the coin-finder, a
counter for registering the number of coins ad
vanced by the finder, a spring retracted member
30 operatively associated with the counter and po
sitioned to be tensioned by each advanced coin
and coin-releasing means utilizing the tensioned
member to speed ejection of the coin, the said
coin-releasing means being actuated by the ac
tuating arm of the coin-iinder.
11. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance
passage for coins, a coin-finder adapted to ad
vance inserted coins to the point required for
ejection, an actuating arm for the coin-finder,
40 a counter for registering the number of coins
advanced by the ñnder, a spring retracted mem
ber operatively associated With the counter and
positioned to be tensioned by each advanced coin
and coin-discharging means utilizing the ten
45 sioned member to speed ejection of the coins, the
actuating arm of the coin-finder cooperating to
ñrst position the coin-discharging means to sup
port the coins advanced by the coin-finder and
subsequently re-position said means to remove
50 the support and permit the coins to be ejected.
12. In a coin-control mechanism, an entrance
passage for coins, a coin-iinder adapted to ad
vance inserted coins to the point required for
ejection, a counter for registering the number of
coins advanced by the ñnder, a spring retracted
member operatively associated with the counter
and positioned to be tensioned by each advanced
coin, a coin support, and means spring-connected
to but movable independently of the coin-finder
60 for shifting said support clear of the coin on the
back stroke of the coin-finder to permit said ten
sioned member to eject the coin.
13. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of different diameters,
65 a coin-finder adapted to advance inserted coins of
diiïerent diameters along a common path, count
ers for registering the number of coins advanced
by the finder, a coin-selector for each counter
normally disconnected from its counter, each of
70 the said selectors being constructed and posi
tioned in the aforesaid common path to be given
limited movement by the coin it selects, means
utilizing the movement imparted to a selector by
a coin to operatively connect that selector with
its counter, and requisite actuating means for
giving motion to the selector to operate the
counter.
14. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of different diameters, a
coin-finder adapted to advance inserted coins of
different diameters along a common path, count
ers for registering the number of coins advanced
by the iinder, a coin-selector for each counter
normally disconnected from its counter, each of
the said selectors being constructed and posi
tioned in the aforesaid common path to be given
limited movement and held under tension by the
coin selected, means utilizing the movement im- .
parted to any one of the several selectors by a
coin to position a member of that selector for
engagement with a member of its counter, and
means for actuating the selector member to oper
ate the counter and for subsequently releasing
and discharging the coin.
15. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of different diameters,
a coin-finder adapted to advance inserted coins o1'
different diameters along a common path, count- '
ers for registering the number of coins advanced
by the ñnder, a coin-selector for each counter
normally disconnected from its counter,` each of
the said selectors being constructed and posi
tioned in the aforesaid common` path to be given 30
limited movement and held under tension by
the coin selected, means utilizing the movement
imparted to any one of the several selectors by
a coin to position a member of that selector for
engagement with a member of its counter, means -
common to the aforesaid members of the several
selectors for actuating the same and means for
subsequently releasing and discharging the coin.
16. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of different diameters, a 40
coin-finder adapted to advance inserted coins of
diiïerent diameters along a common path, an
actuating arm for the coin-iinder, counters for
registering the number of coins advanced by the
ñnder, a coin selector for each counter, each of 45
the selectors being constructed and positioned
to be given limited movement by the coin selected.
means utilizing the movement imparted to any
one of the selectors by a coin to position a mem
ber of that selector for engagement with a mem
50
ber of its counter, and means for transmitting
motion from the finder-actuating arm to the
aforesaid selector members to operate the proper
counter for the coin selected.
17. In a coin-control mechanism, a single en
trance passage for coins of different diameters,
a coin-finder adapted to advance inserted coins
of diderent diameters along a common path, an
actuating arm for the coin-iinder, the said arm
being mounted to have forward and back move 60
ment about a center, counters for registering the
number of coins advanced by the finder, a coin
selector for each counter normally disconnected
from its counter, means utilizing each coin ad
vanced by the finder to operatively connect the
selector of a coin with the counter for that selec
tor, and means for simultaneously transmitting
motion from the ñnder-actuating arm on its back
stroke to the aforesaid members of the several
selectors to operate the proper counter of the
coin selected.
70
WILLIAM J. KENNEDY.
fi
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