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Патент USA US2113767

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Patentedv Apr. 12,- 1938
, 2,113,767
UNITED STATES PATENT‘ OFFICE
2,118,767
,
MANUFACTURE OF LAMINATED ‘GLASS
Louis Paggi, Belleville, N. 1., assignor, by mesne
assignments, to E. 1. .du Pont de'Nemours &
Company, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of
. Delaware
No Drawing. ‘Application July ‘1a, 1936,
~
,
'
Serial No. 91,391
9Claims.
This invention relates to the manufacture of
laminated glass, 1. e., safety glass, and, more par
(CI.
"
49-81) ,
-
.
without squeezing out the interlayer material it
self from between the glasses.
It ‘will thus be
ticularly, to the treatment of the interlayer sheet- . seen that, even if the interlayer sheeting could
ing used therein.v
The type of laminated glass herein considered
5
comprises at least one sheet of‘ glass bonded to a
preformed sheet of organic plastic which is known
as the "interlayer”; more generally, the plastic
sheet or interlayer is interposed between two
sheets of glass. In recent years, these interlayers
have been made relatively pliable and soft; usual
ly, this has been accomplished by increasing the
proportion of plasticizer used in the plastic com
position i’rom which the interlayers are made and
15 it is to this type of interlayer, comprising an or
ganic plastic containing plasticizer, that the pres
ent invention relates.
Although these softer, more pliable interlayers
have outstanding advantages for use in laminated
glass, their tackiness, or self-adhesiveness, at or
20 dinary temperatures has raised a serious problem
in handling and shipping. Many of the more de
sirable plastic compositions for interlayers have
heretofore been barred from use because they
were so tacky, or self-adhesive, that no commer
25 cially practical method of handling and shipping
them could be devised.
,
3O
The plastic for’ the interlayer is either formed
into individual sheets which are stacked for han
~dling and shipping, or is rolled up on itself on a
mandrel in continuous lengths for handling and
shipping. Even where the interlayer‘ sheeting is
not obviously tacky in the ordinary sense of the
word, when it is cut in sheets’ and piled in a
stack, or when it is rolled up in. continuous
lengths, under normal conditions of shipping and
storage, it tends to become stuck together suf
?clently so that it cannot be separated without
di?lculty or damage; the term “self-adhesive" is
40 used herein to denote that degree of adhesiveness
of the interlayer sheeting which may not neces
sarily be obviously tacky but which posesses‘ a
latent adhesiveness that may only become effec
tive under storage conditions involving pressure
45' (the weight of material above or from the tension
in a tight roll) and summer warmth.
Where the interlayer sheet is not only self-ad
hesive but actually tacky, a further dimculty in
using it is that of excluding air bubbles between
r0 the interlayer and the glass. The sticky and
be made right at the point of lamination, thus
avoiding thedifllculty in shipping and storing
tacky‘interiayer sheets, there would still be the
ditllculty in the actual laminating step.‘
‘
An object of the present invention is to provide
a practical method‘ of handling, packing, ship
ping, and storing self-adhesive or tacky interlay
er sheets comprising an organic plastic contain‘
ing a plasticizer' therein, either as individual
sheets‘ or in continuous lengths. A further object
isto provide a practical method‘ of eliminating
the tackiness of this type of interlayer sheet even
though there is no necessity of completely elimi
nating the self-adhesive characteristic of the
sheet. A further‘ object is to provide a method of
accomplishing the above results without any ap
preciable increase in the cost of making lami- 2o
nated'iglass and without detrimental effect upon
the appearance or protective character of the
laminated glass. A still further object is to pro
vide a method of treating the interlayer sheets
so that they can be handled without difficulty and
yet which will involve no additional steps in the
regular lamination routine. Other objects of the
invention will be apparent from the description
given hereinafter.
‘
The above objects are accomplished according
to the present invention by coating the surface of
an interlayer sheet of organic plastic containing
suillcient plasticizer therein to make the sheet
tacky or, at least,‘ self-adhesive, with a thin layer
of similar organic plastic in which the plasticizer 35
content is su?iciently low so that said layer will
be non-tacky and, preferably, non-self-adhesive,
and thereafter bonding said interlayer sheet to
glass without removing said layer.
‘Preferably, both sides of the interlayer sheet 40
are coated with an organic plastic having the
same base as the interlayer but containing‘ no
plasticizer, the thickness of the coating being suf
?cient to make the interlayer sheet non-self-ad
hesive, if desired, or relatively thinner if a non- 45
tacky, but not necessarily non-self-ad-hesive, in- '
terlayer sheet will answer the purpose. The in
terlayer sheet, thus treated, can be handled with
out inconvenience and maybe laminated with
glass, witiazonwithout adhesive, .as desired. the _,
pliable nature of such interlayersheets makes it
coated interlayer‘
diiilcult to lay them out ?at eni‘the'glass without
the same properties as the uncoated interlayer in
‘ trapping air and this softness and comparatively
ready flowability makes it impractical to squeeze
“5 out such trapped air from the laminated glass
paw; substantially
so far as bonding to glass is concemed.
" I ,
The present invention resides in thedisoovery
that the tackiness or self-adhesiveness of this
2,113,707
Successive layers of it stacked under a weight
of 12 pounds per square inch at 45° C. for 24
tic comprising the same base material as that‘ hours do not stick together.
The sprayed sheeting is laid out vfiat on glass
contained in the interlayer or one closely related
thereto and either no plasticizer or plasticizer in with no- difficulty, and is satisfactorily bonded
a proportion sovsmall that the organic plastic between two panes of clean glass by theapplica
when deposited'as a layer, is no longer tacky, and tion of a temperature of 135° C. and a pressure of
soft type of interlayer sheeting may be eliminated
by coating it with a thin layer of an organic plas
yet,v when the interlayer thus coated is subjected 180-200 pounds per square inch in an autoclave,
to the usual laminating routine, it will bond to without the use of auxiliary adhesive.
Example 2.—The self-adhesive sheeting of Ex 10
10 the glass as well, to all intents and‘purposes, as
the uncoated interlayer will. It is believed that ' ample 1 is sprayed with the solution of Example
‘ the unexpected fact that the'protectivecoating'
1, but with a thinner coating, which after drying
has a thickness of about 0.0005 inch. This coat
has no deleterious effect on the bond tb'the‘ glass,
is partly due to the plasticizer’ in the interlayer
15 sheet penetrating the non-tacky coating under
the laminating conditions.
I
ed sheeting will stick together somewhat in the
artificial storage test described in Example 1, 15
> i. e., under some pressure, but can be laid out
It should be understood that though the base
of the organic plastic in both the interlayer prop
er and the non-tacky protective coating should
20
be the same in so far as general typev‘is
concerned,
.
?at on glass without sticking to the glass, and
will bond to glass, under the pressure and tem
perature of Example 1, without‘ auxiliary ad
hesive.
.
.
.
'
I
.
20
'
Example 3.,—'-'I'his is the same as Example 1,
the invention contemplates within its scope ‘the '
except that the coating is'applied by dipping the
use of "different but closely related organic com
pounds, where one is better adapted for use in sheeting tn the coating solution, and drying. _The
the interlayer per_se, and the other for use _in the V thickness of the coating is the same, and it gives
the same results as those of the sprayed coating 25
25 non-tacky coating. For example, two closely re
of Example 1.
.
‘
.
'
lated but not identical aldehyde-modified poly
Example 4.—A self-adhesive sheeting com
vinyl acetal resins or cellulose acetates might
1
advantageously be employed, the one used in posed of:
, Parts
the coating having less inherent tendency to 'be
30 tacky or being readily soluble in a volatile‘sol
Cellulose acetate (acele type) ___________ __ 42 30
vent having, little or no solvent action on the
other. The use of either the identical base ma
terials or two closely related base materials ‘are
full equivalents in so far as this invention is
35
concerned.
,
.7
p
The following examples are given to illustrate
speci?c embodiments of the invention, parts be
ing given by weight:
-
Dimethyl phthalate_____________________ ..> 58
is sprayed with a hot solution of:
h
_ Parts
Cellulose acetate (plastics type) __________ __
5
70% ethyl alcohol _______________________ __
80
Acetone ________________________________ __
15
85
The thickness of the coating, after evaporation
.
In Example 1 a self-adhesive interlayer of a
40 base of an aldehyde-modified polyvinyl acetate
of the solvent, is about 0.002 inch.
'
I The coated interlayer is not self-adhesive, and
resin, “A”, is'coated with a solution of another
.closely related aldehyde-modi?ed polyvinyl ace
tate resin,~“B”. These resins are made from poly
successive layers of it do not stick to each other
‘ vinyl acetate by hydrolysis and interaction with
45 formaldehyde, and their molecular compositions
without di?iculty, and is satisfactorily bonded
under conditions of storage.
'
The coated interlayer is laid out flat on glass
between two panes of glass, without the use of 45
may be expressed in terms of percentages of vinyl an auxiliary adhesive, by the application of a
acetate, vinyl alcohol and vinyl formal, as de- ' pressure of 180 pounds per. square inch and a
termined by analysis. The resindesignated .“A” temperature of 140° C., in an autoclave.
Example 5.—A self-adhesive'interlayer sheet-'
is typical of resins of this class in which the per
centage of vinyl acetate is not over 12.5,~that of ing composed of:
Parts
vinyl alcohol not over 12.5 and vinyl formal not
less than'l?. The resin designated "B” is typical Pyroxylin (of approximately 11% nitrogen
content, of the type customarily used in
oi.’ resins of. this class in-which the percentage
plastics) ; ____________________________ __
44
of vinyl acetate is not over 10, that of vinyl al
55 cohol not less than 20 and thatjof vinyl formal Diamyl phthalate_____ _________ __‘ ________ __ 56
not more than 70.
.
EmmpleL-A self-adhesive sheeting composed
of resin “A”, containing;
.
60
’
9.7%
Parts
Vinyl
acetate ______ __,__
Vinyl
valcohol ____ __~___~_ ‘12.4% ____»_____ __ 49.5 '
Vinyl formal _________ __ ‘77.9%
Diethyl phthalate__;.-..
_'_
‘ ‘
Dimethyl phthalate_-_..]_;;
'
‘~
.
_____ _.30
____ 20.5
is sprayed with’ a solution composed of:
_
Parts
Pyroxylin (the same as‘ above) __________ __-
5
Acetone ______ ______>_____:;=L.‘_~__' _________ __ v95
The thickness of the coating," after evaporation
of the solvent, is about 0.0018 inch and the coated
interlayer is non-tacky.
‘
The sprayed’ sheeting is laid out ?at on glass
'in'posed of without dimculty, and is satisfactorily bonded 65
65 is sprayed with a warm
betweeh‘two panes of glass by the application of
resin “B”, containing: ,
- 1
'. .
_a‘teanperature of 135° C. and a pressure of 180
Vinyl acetate _____ __-_..__ 4.2%
pounds per square inch, without the use of aux
Vinylv alcohol _______ -‘__ 27.6%
I vQ iiiary adhesives».
_;Vinyl formal;_.-._-,._768.2%
,
I >
‘Egtdihvle 6.—A' sel?afdhesive interlayer sheet 70
70 ‘Ethyl
l1C0hO1.-_'_;_
> ____ __
.___-_‘_-"70 '_
in'geof ‘a base of ‘are synthetic resin known as
vDistilled water_________________________ _;'2'l'.5
‘fVinylite X” (Chemical
Metallurgical En
The thickness of the‘v coating,
evaporation’ gineéring, 43 177 (April 1036)) and containing
of the-solvent, is about 0.002 inch.
The spmyedsheeting is no longer self-adhesive.
plasticizer, is sprayed with a solution of 2.5 parts
of the same resin in 97.5 parts of methanol.
The
"Is
3
1.118.116? .
thickness of the coating, after evaporation of the
is sprayed with a solution composed of:
solvent, is between 0.0015 and 0.0020 inch and
the sprayed interlayer is non-tacky.
The sprayed interlayer sheeting is laid out ?at
The same resin ___________________ _; ____ __
on glass without diihculty, and is satisfactorily
bonded between two panes of glass by the appli
Distilled water _________________________ -_ 27.5
cation of a temperature of 121° C. and a pressure
of .180 pounds per square inch, without the use
of auxiliary adhesive.
Example 7.—-A self-adhesive interlayer sheet
ing‘ composed of:
10
'
.
Parts
Polymethyl alpha methacrylate _____ _. ____ __ 45
Diamyl phthalate ________________________ __ 55
is sprayed .with a solution composed of:
V
'
Parts
Polyinethyl alpha methacrylate ___________ __
3
Acetone ________ __- ___________________ _,_.____
97
20
. The thickness of the coating, after-evaporation
of the solvent, is about 0.002 inch'and the coated
interlayer is nong-tacb.
The coated interlayer sheet is bonded to, glass
by ‘the application of heat and pressure.
Example 8.—A self-adhesive interlayer sheeting
composed of:
1
Parts
Cellulose acetate (acele type)__-_. ________ __ 35
30 Dimethyl phthalate ______________________ _--65
is sprayed with a hot solution composed of:
_
Methyl
The thickness of the coating, after evaporation of
the solvent, is between 0.0015 and 0.002 inch.
This coated interlayer sheeting has substan
10
tially the same properties as that in Example 9.
The coating substance need not be, ‘in and of
itself, a complete adhesive for effecting lamina
tion of interlayer and'glass under heat and pres
sure. It may be modi?ed or supplemented by
other ingredients at the time of lamination, and 15
the whole, of the adhesive effect. This is illus
trated in Example 12.
Example 12.-A self-adhesive interlayer-sheet
ing composed of:
>
Parts
Ethyl cellulose ___________________________ __ 45
Dlamyl phthalate _________________________ _. .55
is sprayed with asolution composed of:
Ethyl
5
The thickness of the coating, after evaporation
of the solvent, is about 0.001 inch. ‘
The thickness of. the coating, after evaporation
oi’ the solvent, is between 0.0015 and 0.0020 inch. 30
The sprayed sheeting is laid out without dif
iliary adhesive layer deposited by spraying with
a solution composed of:
Parts
Example 9.-—This is the same as Example 8, ex
cept that the coating is applied by dipping the
sheeting in the coating solution, and drying.
The thickness of the coating is the same, and it
gives the same results as those of the sprayed
_
Example 10.—A self-adhesive interlayer sheet
ing composed of :
Parts
'50 Formaldehyde-‘modified polyvinyl acetate of
type “8" above _____________ _. _________ __ 50
Dimethyl phthalate ______________________ __ 50
is sprayed with a solution composed of:
‘
7
Parts
2.5
Alcohol ________________________________ -_ _ 70.0
Distilled water _______________________ _-___ 27.5
The thickness of the coating, after evaporation of
the solvent, is between 0.0015 and 0.002 inch. ‘
This coated interlayer sheeting will stick to
gether somewhat in the'arti?cial storage test-de
- scribed iii-Example l, i. e., under some pressure,
05 but it can he laid out ?at on glasswithout stick
.
acetate ______________ __~________ __ 405.0
Butyl
acetate ________________________ __ 600.0
and is satisfactorily bonded between glasses thus
coated, by the application of heat and pressure.
The above examples illustrate various specific
embodiments coming within the scope of the in
vention. The method of applying the non-tacky
layer to the interlayer sheeting may be any of
those used in the art such as spraying, brushing,
dipping. and the like. It will be obvious that
the non-tacky layer should be applied to the
sheeting in such a manner and, if necessary, with
the assistance of such liquid vehicles, that it will
be of suitable thickness and uniformity and,
further, will be bonded to the surface of the in
terlayer sheeting so that it will not become de
tached during ordinary handling.
'
The methods of spraying and dipping are to be
preferred in commercial ‘practice and may be
readily made a partof the sequence of operations
in the production of interlayer sheeting in .con 60
tinuous manner, the application of the coating
being made at whatever may be the most ad
vantageous point in the process, either before,
during, or after the seasoning step.
The selection of a liquid solvent or vehicle for’ 65
out auxiliary- adheslva; ::
those skilled in the art. In general, a better
union between the non-tacky layer and the sur
face of the interlayer sheeting is obtained by the
use, as a vehicle for the former, of a liquid which
is a solvent ,for the latter, but, on the other
hand, the use of such a liquid which, to some
degree, penetrates beneath the surface of the in
terlayer sheeting, will necessitate a seasoning
. V. »
ing composed of:
'
f f
i
J
Parts
type “A" above ______________ __, ______ __-_' 49.5
Dimethyl phthalate ____________ -. _____ __‘_ 20.5
Diethyl phthalate ______________ __-:_ _____ __ 30.0
40
Acetone _____________________________ __s 225.0
the coating substance in any specific instance
will be based upon the ordinary knowledge of
Formaldehyde-modi?ed poiyvinyl‘acetate of i
75
101.25
‘Ethyl
ing to the glassjand will bond to glass, under
the pressure andtéh?icsature of Example 1, with
Example III-A selfeadhmive interlayer sheet
70
67.5
Diamyl phthalate ____________________ _T 101.25
Camphor ____________________________ .._
The coated interlayer is non-tacky, but not
completely non-self-adhesive. It can be bonded
40 to glass without auxiliary adhesive.
,
2.5
A'cetone ___________________ _~. ________ -'.--.‘ 07.5
Ethyl cellulose (low viscosity) _________ __
The same resin __________ -'_ ____________ __
25
cellulose _________________________ __
acetate __________________________ __ 95
coating of Example 2.
20
-
?culty on glasspreviously covered with an aux
Parts
Cellulose acetate (acele type) ___________ _l__
.
-
- thus come to contribute an element, rather than
'
-
2.5
AlcohoLu, ____________________________ __ 70.0
4
9,118,767
treatment of the latter to effect its removal. If
the coating substance in a vehicle which is a
solvent for the interlayer sheeting, is applied to
the latter prior to the completion of the season
ing operation which the interlayer sheeting is
undergoing at any rate as a means ofv removal
from it of solvent used in its manufacture, then
the additional seasoning necessitated by the pres
ence of further solvent in the coating mixture
10 will'not ordinarily extend materially the time
required for the seasoning treatment.
'
_ It is preferredthat the plasticizer be omitted
entirely from the plastic used to coat the inter
layer sheeting, although plastlcizer may be pres
15 ent as long as there is not suillcient to give a tacky
.layer. It‘has been observed that, when the coat
ing is sprayed on the interlayer sheeting, a plastic
containing a relatively high proportion 01" plas
ticizer may be used and, in some instances, a
20 non-tacky layer has resulted where the proportion
of plasticizer in the plastic dissolved up and
sprayed on the interlayer sheeting, has>_been
equal to that in the interlayer sheeting which
was tacky. A partial explanation of this is be
will be non-tacky and yet still self-adhesive and
then coated with pulverulent borax, or the like.
to make the sheeting de?nitely non-self-adhesive
while being handled and shipped.
When the
sheeting is to' be laminated, the borax or other
water-soluble solid can be washed oil’, thus leav
ing the sheeting self-adhesive which is no dis
advantage at this point, but non-tacky, so that
it can be readily laid out ?at on the glass pane
without trapping air and then bonded to the 10
glass in the'usual manner. It will be understood
thatthe thin layer of the organic plastic applied
to the interlayer sheeting to overcome its tack
iness is not removed with the borax or other
water-soluble solid used to overcome the self~ad
hesiveness of the sheet.
The present invention provides a highly prac
tical method’ of eliminating tackiness or self
adhesivenessof interlayer sheetings thus facil
itating the handling, shipping, and laminating of 20
the .soi!ter_v type of interlayers. The protective
layer of the present invention may be readily and
inexpensively applied to the interlayer sheeting
and has the advantage that it does not have to be
remlwefore lamination since it contributes
25 lieved to be due to the fact that some plasticizer
is lost in the spraying. When using relatively - all or parthf‘ the adhesivee?ect required for the
high plasticizer content plastics for the non
tacky layer, spraying is di?erent and not equiv
'30
ultimate bonding of the sheeting to glass. Fur
ther, the protective layer on the interlayer
sheeting does not complicate the established gen
eral technique of bonding interlayer to glass, nor 30
alent to brushing and dipping to this extent.
As shown in the specific examples, the inven
tion is generally applicable to the various organic
, does it have any deleterious effect on the ?nished
plastics used in'the manufacture. of interlayers.
It is particularly applicable to interlayers having
laminated glass.
As many apparently widely different embodi
a base of a polyvinyl acetal resin, or cellulose
35 acetate, but is also applicable to interlayers made
of methacrylate resins, cellulose nitrate, and
the like, the principle of the invention being
identical in each instance.
,
_‘
The specificexamples give numerous illustra
40 tlons of the thickness of the protective layer to
give non-tacky and non-self-adhesive surfaces
with various speci?c plastic compositions. In
commercial operations. the optimum thickness of
the protective layer required underxthe conditions
to which the interlayer sheeting is to be sub
jected, can be readily determined vby tests. - In
all instances, a relatively thin layer is adequate
ments of this invention may be made without de
parting from the spirit and scope thereof, it is to
be understood that the invention is not limited
to the specific embodiments thereof except as
defined in the appended claims.
I claim:
1. An interlayer for use in laminated glass com
prising a sheet of organic plastic containing su?i—
cient plasticizer therein to make the sheet tacky,
having its surfaces coated with a thin layer of a
similar organic plastic in which the plasticizer
content is so small that said layer will be new 45
tacky, said layer being adapted to form at least a
part of the adhesive bonding said interlayer to
and a thinner layer will su?ice where the inter
glass.
layer sheeting will be handled during the winter
2. An interlayer for use in laminated glass
comprising a sheet of organic ‘plastic containing
su?lcient plasticizer therein to make the sheet
self-adhesive, having its surfaces coated with a
thin, non-seli-adhesive layer of a similar organic
plastic containing no plasticizer, said layer being
adapted to form at least a part of the adhesive
50 months and hence not be subjected to elevated
temperature, or where it is not necessary that the
interlayer sheeting be non-self-adhesive.
In copending application Serial No. 91,426
filed July 18, 1936 entitled “Manufacture of
55 laminated glass", Maurice L. Macht, applicant,
has disclosed a means of overcoming the self
bonding ‘said interlayer to glass.
adhesiveness of interlayer sheeting by depositing
3. An interlayer for use in laminated glass
on the surface of the sheeting a thin layer ofv a
comprising a sheet of polyvinyl acetal resin plas- -
non-self-adhesive substance inert toward the»
tic containing suihcient plasticizer therein to
make the ‘sheet tacky, having its surfaces coated 60
60 plastic material of the sheeting and soluble in
The
with a thin layer of a similar polyvinyl acetal
interlayer sheeting thus protected can be handled
resin plastic in which the plasticizer content is so
small that said layer will be non-tacky, said layer
a liquid inert toward the plastic material.
and shipped conveniently but the non-self-ad
hesive layer must be removed before the sheet
can-be bonded to glass. Preferably, a puverulent,
non-self-adhesive water-soluble solid such as
borax is used to coat the sheeting and it is washed
03 with water prior to the actual laminating
‘step.
'
_
Applicant has discovered that tacky interlaye
sheeting may be coated with a thin layer of an
organic plastic comprising the same‘. base mate
rial as that contained in the interlayer or one
closely related thereto ‘and either no plasticizer
75 or plasticizer in proportion so small that the layer
being adapted to form at least a part of the ad
hesive bonding said interlayer to glass.
. 4. An vinterlayer for use in laminated glass
comprising a sheet of cellulose derivative plastic
containing su?lcient plasticizer therein to make
the sheet tacky, having its surfaces coated with
ya thin layer of a similar cellulose derivative 70
plastic in which the plasticizer content is so
small that saidlayer will be non-tacky, said layer
being adapted to form at least a part. 0! the
adhesive bonding said interlayer to glass. .
5. In the manufacture oi’ laminated glass, the
n
steps comprising coating the‘ surface of an inter
layer sheet of a cellulose derivative plastic con
layer sheet of organic plastic containing su?icient
taining sumcient plasticizer therein to make the
plasticizer therein to make the sheet tacky, with
a thin layer of a similar organic plastic in which
the plasticiser content is so small that said layer
‘will be non-tacky, and thereafter bonding said
interlayer sheet to glass without removing said
sheet tacky, with a thin layer of a similar cellu
layer.
'
8. In the manufacture of laminated glass, the
steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
layer sheet of organic plastic containing suiilcient
plasticiser therein to make the sheet self-adhe
sive,'with a thin layer of a similar organic plastic
containing no plasticlzer, and thereafter bonding
said interlayer sheet to glass without removing
said layer.
_
_
\
'I. In the manufacture of laminated glass, the
' steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
layer sheet of polyvinyl acetal resin plastic con,
taining suiiicient plasticiser therein to make the
sheet tacky, with a thin layer of a similar poly
vinyl acetal resin plastic in which the plasticizer
content is so small that said layer will be non
tacky. and thereafter bonding said interlayer
:5 sheet to glass without removing said layer.
8. In the manufacture of laminated glass, the
steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
lose derivative plastic ln which the plasticizer
content is so small that said layer will be non
tacky, and thereafter bonding said interlayer
sheet to glass without removing said layer.
9. In the manufacture of laminated glass. the
steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
layer sheet of organic plastic containing 'suiiicient
plasticizer therein to make the sheet tacky, with
a thin layer of a similar organic plastic in which
the plasticizer content is so small that said layer
will be non-tacky, then depositing‘ on said layer
of organic plastic' a thin layer of a puiveriilent
non-self-adheslve solid substance inert toward
said organic plastic and soluble in water to allow
said interlayer sheet to be handled. shipped, and
stored without danger of its adhering to itself
or similar i'nterlayer sheets, thereafter washing
said non-self-adhesive solid substance from [the
interlayer sheet with water, drying said inter
layer sheet and then bonding said interlayer
sheet toglass without removing said layer of said
organic plastic.
LOUIS PAGGI.
D I SO LAI M E R
2,113,7s7.‘-Loui8 P
Patent da
', Belleville, N. J:- MANUFACTURE ~01‘, LAMINATED GLASS.
April 12, 1938. Disclaimer ?led February 11, 1939, by the
assignee. E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company.
Hereb enters this disclaimer to claims 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7, of said speci?cation.
[ ?c'ial Gazette March 14, 1939.]
steps comprising coating the‘ surface of an inter
layer sheet of a cellulose derivative plastic con
layer sheet of organic plastic containing su?icient
taining sumcient plasticizer therein to make the
plasticizer therein to make the sheet tacky, with
a thin layer of a similar organic plastic in which
the plasticiser content is so small that said layer
‘will be non-tacky, and thereafter bonding said
interlayer sheet to glass without removing said
sheet tacky, with a thin layer of a similar cellu
layer.
'
8. In the manufacture of laminated glass, the
steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
layer sheet of organic plastic containing suiilcient
plasticiser therein to make the sheet self-adhe
sive,'with a thin layer of a similar organic plastic
containing no plasticlzer, and thereafter bonding
said interlayer sheet to glass without removing
said layer.
_
_
\
'I. In the manufacture of laminated glass, the
' steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
layer sheet of polyvinyl acetal resin plastic con,
taining suiiicient plasticiser therein to make the
sheet tacky, with a thin layer of a similar poly
vinyl acetal resin plastic in which the plasticizer
content is so small that said layer will be non
tacky. and thereafter bonding said interlayer
:5 sheet to glass without removing said layer.
8. In the manufacture of laminated glass, the
steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
lose derivative plastic ln which the plasticizer
content is so small that said layer will be non
tacky, and thereafter bonding said interlayer
sheet to glass without removing said layer.
9. In the manufacture of laminated glass. the
steps comprising coating the surface of an inter
layer sheet of organic plastic containing 'suiiicient
plasticizer therein to make the sheet tacky, with
a thin layer of a similar organic plastic in which
the plasticizer content is so small that said layer
will be non-tacky, then depositing‘ on said layer
of organic plastic' a thin layer of a puiveriilent
non-self-adheslve solid substance inert toward
said organic plastic and soluble in water to allow
said interlayer sheet to be handled. shipped, and
stored without danger of its adhering to itself
or similar i'nterlayer sheets, thereafter washing
said non-self-adhesive solid substance from [the
interlayer sheet with water, drying said inter
layer sheet and then bonding said interlayer
sheet toglass without removing said layer of said
organic plastic.
LOUIS PAGGI.
D I SO LAI M E R
2,113,7s7.‘-Loui8 P
Patent da
', Belleville, N. J:- MANUFACTURE ~01‘, LAMINATED GLASS.
April 12, 1938. Disclaimer ?led February 11, 1939, by the
assignee. E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company.
Hereb enters this disclaimer to claims 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7, of said speci?cation.
[ ?c'ial Gazette March 14, 1939.]
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