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Патент USA US2113952

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April 12, 1938.
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11A. STERNBERG.
2,113,952
MOUNT‘FOR ELECTRON DISCHARGE DEVICES
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Filed June 27, 1934‘
INVENTOR
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THEODORE A.-5TERNBER6
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BY
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ATTORNEY
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Patented Apr. 12, 1938
2,113,952
UNITED STATES PATENT OFF-ICE
2,113,952
MOUNT FOB ELECTRON DISCHARGE
DEVICES
Theodore A. Sternberg, Newark, N. 1., assignor
to Radio Corporation of America, a corporation
of Delaware
Application June 27, 1934, Serial No. 732,553
zClaims. (Cl. 250-275) ‘
My invention relates to improvements in elecand engaging the interior walls of the bulb with
5
tron discharge devices and more particularly to
improved means for ?rmly and accurately posi
tioning the electrode mount within the envelope
out injury to the mount during assembly or to the
bulb during exhaust.
The novel features which I believe to be char
of a. tube.
acteristic of my invention are set forth with par- 5
'
,
In modern tubes such as tubes having dome
type bulbs or envelopes, it is found desirable to
hold the electrode assembly ?rmly in place in the
envelope to prevent transverse movement of the
10 mount. To this end the dome or other constrict
ed portion of the tube is utilized to steady the
electrode assembly against transverse movement
and to keep the assembly more ?rmly established
in position than when the assembly is supported
15 and steadied only from the stem press. The
mount should be steadied su?lciently to avoid
noises, such as clicking, due to contact between
the electrode assembly and the envelope when
the tube is jarred or vigorously vibrated. The
‘ 20 steadying means or mount spacer should be su?l
ciently resilient to avoid the stresses and distor
tion of the mount assembly produced when a
mount with a rigid steadying means is forced into
a bulb dome smaller than usual. Metallic spring
25 spacers are resilient and easily made and at
‘ tached to the mount, but the use of such metallic
springs to steady the mount has not heretofore
been favored because strain checks and cracks
were often produced in the, glass bulb during
30 exhaust at the points where the metal touched
the glass. It is the‘usual practice to attach to
the mount, the mica mount spacers either in the
form of a plate or disc extending transversely of
the dome portion of the envelopeor in the form
35 of vertical oblong shaped micas attached to the
mount intermediate their'ends and with their
ends in contact with the walls of the bulb. Mica
mount’ spacers also have some disadvantages, as
commercial mica varies from .008" to .020" in
40 thickness and the resiliency of the mica mount
spacers varies considerably with the result that
the mounts are not always positioned centrally
oi‘ the bulb.
Attaching the vertical micas to the '
mount is sometimes dimcult and various ways of
45 attaching‘the mica have been devised. Further
“ more, mica may split under stress and sometimes
blisters during the high frequency heat treat
ment. A metallic spring mount spacer would in
‘
many cases be preferable to a mica spacer it it
50 could be used without harm to the bulb or to the
tube.
The principal object of my invention is to hold
firmly and accurately the free end of an electrode
mount within the bulb of an electron discharge
‘ device by metallic springs secured to the mount
ticularity in the appended claims, but the in
vention itself will best be understood by reference
to the following description taken in connection
with the accompanying drawing in which Figure
1 is a partial view in perspective vof one form of 10
an electron discharge device embodying my in
vention; Figure 2 is an enlarged horizontal cross
section taken along line 2-2 of Figure 1; Figure
3 is an enlarged partial vertical section taken
along lines 3-3 of Figure 2; Figure 4 is a par- 15
tial view in perspective‘ of a modification of
an. electron discharge device embodying my
invention; Figure 5 is an enlarged - horizon
tal cross section taken along the line 5-4
of Figure 4; Figure 6 is an enlarged partial ver- 20
tical section taken along line 6—-6 of Figure 5;
Figure '7 is a partial plan view of another modi?
cation‘ of an‘ electron discharge device embody
ing my- invention; Figure 8 is an enlarged verti
cal section taken along the line H of Figure 25
,7; Figure 9 is a partial plan view of a still further
modi?cation of an electron discharge ‘device em
bodying my invention and Figure 10 is an en
larged vertical section taken along line "-10
of Figure 9.
The electron discharge device shown in Figure
i has a dome type of bulb it, which is provided
with the usual stem press and base not shown.
The amount ll comprises the usual electrode as
sembly and extends into the tubular-portion or 35
dome of the bulb Ill. The mount has secured to
its upper end by straps l3, welded to the mount,
a sheet insulator or electrode spacer l2, prefer
ably of mica, which may be of any shape but is
shown as a hexagonally shaped plate in Figures 40
1, 2 and 3 and which extends transversely of the
mount and of the tubular portion or dome of the
envelope Ill.
-
In view of the fact that the envelopes are not‘
all of exactly the same diameter, rigid mount 45
spacers fastened to the upper end of the mount
to ?t snugly in the dome are not feasible. If
the mount spacers are rigid and ?t the largest
envelope the mount will be stressed and distorted
when a smaller envelope is placed over the mount 50
assembly, while if the spacer ?ts the smaller en
velope it will be loose in the large envelope and
clicking will result.
In accordance with my invention I provide the
mica plate l2 with resilient metallic spring 65
2
2,118,952
spacers or ?ngers M, which are fastened to and
extend radially from the edge of the plate [2 into
the mica and contact the interior walls of the
tubular portion of the envelope to space the
contact with the inner wall of the, dome ofvthe , mount within this portion of the envelope.
As shown in the modi?cation in Figures 9 and
envelope ID to resiliently support and steady the
10 the mica plate ill may be provided with oppo
mount and center it in the envelope.
These metallic spring ?ngers, which may be sitely disposed apertures II and 32 into which
made for example of tungsten- or molybdenum portions of the metallic spring elements or mount
wire, may be fastened as best shown in Figure 3
spacers 33 ~and SI‘ extend and are fastened to
gether preferably by welding‘at points II and II.
The ends of the springs which extend over the
edges of the mica and into contact with the wall
of the bulb may also be welded together.
These metallic spring ?ngers are capable of
bulb is placed over the mount the spring ?ngers providing for wider variations of bulb diameters
15 are ?exed downwardly to an extent dependent than the usual type of mica spacer and are 16
on the inner diameter of the dome of the bulb. - usually more easily made and attached to the
These ?ngers resiliently center the mount from mount and retain their resiliency during the seal
the walls within the envelope and prevent clicking ing and high frequency treatment of the mount
at their ‘inner ends to the mica, for example; by
10 means of rivets II which extend thru the mica
spacer i2.» These spring ?ngers are formed with
bowed outer ends which engage the interior wall
of the tubular portion of the envelope. when the
of the tube.
20
during the exhaust operation.
_
I have obtained very good results with tungsten
wire of 10 mil diameter measuring about 5 mm. in
length from the point at which it was fastened
to the mica to the bowed end portion which may
be from 2% to 3 mm. in length. The wire was
riveted to the mica at from 2% to 3 mm. from its
edge. The mica was formed to provide a clear
ance of from 2 to 3 mm. between the edge of the
mica and the wall of the envelope.
,
.While I do not wish to be restricted to any par
ticular theory, I believe that the, success of the
metal spring ?ngers made in accordance with my
.
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While I have indicated the preferred embodi 20
ments of my invention of which I am now aware
and have also indicated only one speci?c applica
tion for which'my'invention may be employed, it
will be apparent that my invention is by no means
limited to the exact forms illustrated or the use
indicated, but that many variations may be made
in'the particular structure used and the purpose
for which it is employed without departing from
the scope of my invention as set forth in the ap
pended claims.
What I claim as new is:-—
.
1. An electron discharge device including an
envelope having a tubular portion, a mount en
closed by said envelope and comprising an elec
prevent conduction of heat to and from the trode assembly positioned to extend into the tu
mount. As a result the temperature of the spring . bular portion, a mica plate secured to the mount
?ngers is always so nearly the same as the tem
to extend transversely of the tubular portion of
perature of the envelope that the temperature the envelope and having an aperture, a metallic '
on oppo
differential between the two is practically neglis ribbon spring having portions
40, gible thus preventing the checks and cracks in site sides of said mica plate and a portion in said 40
~ the glass ‘envelope which are apt to occur when aperture to hold the portions on opposite sides of
metallic spring spacers are used. A large temper
the mica plate in place on said plate with the end
ature differential is likely to occur when heat is of said spring extending over and beyond the edge
rapidly conducted from the metallic spring mount of said mica plate and between the edge of the
45 spacers to the mount when heating the envelope, mica plate and the ‘wall of the envelope to con 45
or by conducting heat to the spring spacers from tact the ,walls of the tubular portion of the en
invention is due to the fact that they are of very
small mass and do not absorb very much heat and
are heat insulated by means of the mica plate to
the mount during the high frequency heat treat
ment of the mount.
In a modi?cation shown in Figures 4, 5 and 6
the mica plate 20 has spaced around it, near its
' edge, slots thru which the metallic spring ribbon
mount spacers 2| extend, the mount‘spacers being
formed as best shown in Figure 6 to provide an
inwardly extending tongue 22 and a folded re
55 verse portion 23 for securing the spring spacers
' or ?ngers to the mica. Good results have been
obtained by making the spring spacers of tinned
steel, about .012" thick and .073" wide. Tungs
- ten or molybdenum, for example, would also have
80. suitable characteristics for use as spring mount
spacers.
,
In the modi?cation shown in Figures '7 and 8
the mica plate 25 is provided with oppositely dis
posed apertures such as 26 and 21, thru which
the metallic spring element in the form of a rib
bon 28 is threaded to secure the ribbon to the
mica so that its ends extend beyond the edges of
velope for resiliently steadying the mount within
the tubular portion of the envelope.
2. An‘ electron discharge device including an
envelope having a tubular portion, a mount en 50
closed by said envelope and comprising an elec
trode assembly positioned to extend into the tu
bular portion, a mica plate secured to the mount
to extend transversely of the tubular portion of
the envelope and having an aperture, a metallic
spring having portions disposed on opposite sides
of said mica plate and a portion in said aperture
to hold the portions on opposite sides of the mica
plate in place on the plate, one end of said spring
being bent back against the mica and the free 60
end of said spring extending over and beyond the
edge of said mica plate and between the edge of
the mica plate and the wall of the envelope to
contact the walls of the tubular portion of the
envelope for resiliently steadying the mount 65
within the tubular portion of the envelope.
THEODORE A. STERNBERG.
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