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Патент USA US2114001

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April‘ 12, 19318.
2,114,001
W. D. HAI'LES
CENTRALIZED TRAFFIC CONTROLLING SYSTEM FOR RAILROADS
Filed June 1, 1936
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W. D. HAILES '
2,114,001
CENTRALIZED TRAFFIC QONTROLLING SYSTEM FOR RAILRCADS I
Filed June 1, 1956
'8 Sheets-Sheet 8
£Ex20 :
ATTORN'EY
2,114,001
Patented Apr. 12, 1938
‘UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
OENTRALIZED TRAFFIG CONTROLLING
“
SYSTEM FOR RAILROADS
William D. Hailes, Brighton, N. Y., assignor to
General Railway Signal Company, Rochester,
_ Application June 1, 1936, Serial No. 82,711
30 Claims.
(01. 246-3)
trolling systems for railroads and itmore‘ partic
during each of which transmission of controls
and/or transmission of indications may occur.
ularly pertains to a means for transmitting‘ and
When controls are transmitted, a station selective
This invention relates to Centralized traffic con
registering controls and‘indications in a, com
5‘: Timunication system of the multiple impulse or
code
type.
'
l
'
code is ?rst applied to the line circuit for select
ing the particular station with which communi
cation is desired and then the controls are trans
‘
The switches and‘ signals are distributed, mitted to that station. Similarly, when indica
throughout the ‘territory in such a system and
tions are transmitted the particular ?eld station
those located relatively near or adjacent each ‘ transmitting such indications ?rst transmits a
10"7other, together with the apparatus provided to
govern these switches and signals, are conven
iently referred to as comprising a ?eld station.
The communication system is provided to inter
- ‘ connect the control of?ce with the several, ?eld
15*‘ stations and it is so organized that ‘complete'con
trol and supervision of the various switch and
signal devices at the remote stations are obtained
by the operator. Such a tra?ic controlling system
is supplemented by the usual automatic block
signal system and other local means ordinarily
provided to guard against unsafe train move
ments, improper operation of track switches and
the like.
'
.
In accordance with the presentinvention, the
5 ‘communication system comprises a two-wire line
station registering code for identifying this sta 10
tion in the control o?ice and then the indications
are transmitted from this station to the control
office.
I For the transmission of controls, a predeter
mined number of impulses of selected polarities 15
are applied to the line circuit, each impulse oper
ating step-by-step apparatus‘ in the'control of?ce
and at the ?eld stations through a cycle of oper
ation, irrespective of the character of the im
pulses. The time spaces between successive im
pulses are varied in length in accordance with
the controls to be transmitted so that these time
spaces are comparatively long‘ or short and they
are combined with the polar impulses to make up
the code for selecting stations and for transmit
20"
circuit extending from the control of?ce through . ting controls thereto.
For the transmission of indications, the im
the several ?eld stations in series. The conduc-l
tors of this line circuit are conveniently referred . pulses themselves are varied in length to provide
to in the drawings as line conductor L and return normally long impulses or abnormally short 1m,
30 conductor R. This two-Wire line circuit is nor-‘. pulses at each step of the stepping mechanism. 30
mally energized from a source of current located ' In addition to the variation in length of impulses,
in the control of?ce, with the line relays and other alternating current is applied to the line circuit,
devices connected in series with the line wires both during the impulse periods and the time
at the ?eld stations and with the line and return spaces between impulse periods for providing
35 conductors permanently, connected together at additional selections for indication transmission. 35
This feature of applying or superimposing alter
the end station to form a closed circuit loop.
The line circuit is so arranged that any ?eld
station in the series may initiate the communi
cation system into a cycle of ‘operations, during
40 which indications are transmitted from the initi
ating ?eld station toI the control o?lce. These
indications comprise multiple impulses making up
a code combination, which effects the registra
tion of thetransmitting ?eld station in the con
45‘ltrol of?ce and the transmission of indications in
accordance with track, and signal conditions at
the transmitting station.
,
"
,7
'
The line circuit is also’ arranged so‘ that the
control office may initiate the operation of, the
50 communication system, during which multiple
nating current on the line circuit for the purpose
of transmitting indications over a stepping cir
cuit transmitting stepping impulses of direct cur
rent is broadly shown in Fig. 4 of the prior appli 40
cation of Hailes and DeLong. Ser. No. 526,674.
?led March 31, 1931, and no claim is made herein
to any invention disclosed in said prior applica
tion. Brie?y the indication codes comprise short
or long impulses, alternating current or no alter 45
nating current superimposed on the line‘ circuit
during the impulse periods and alternating cur- ,
rent or no alternating current superimposed on
the line circuit during the time space periods.
50
For convenience in describing the operation of
this
system the energized or impulse periods from
is e?ective to select a desired ‘station and?to‘;
impulses are transmitted making'up a codev which
transmit controls thereto. ,
" the control oi?ce source of direct current will be‘
The system is of the duplex vtype, that ‘is‘it is" referred to as the “on” periods and the deener
“operated through separate-cycles of operation; > gized or time spaces between direct current im
2,114,001
at the ‘beginning of each cycle, remain‘ up
throughout the cycle'and are dropped at the end
of the cycle. Relay SC is normally picked up, is
levers. Similarly, vone ‘or ‘more signal control
levers may be provided, but for convenience'no
signal lever is illustrated, since the control of
switchesby the illustrated switch levers is typical
dropped out at the beginning of each cycle and ‘
again picked up during the “clearing out” period .
t of the control of signals when signal levers are.
at. the end of each cycle. Relay SC has such
provided.
characteristics that its pick-up time is relatively
A single OS indicating lamp is illustrated for‘
long compared with the pick-up time of quick
the purpose of indicating the method of trans
mitting an OS indication from a particular ?eld
acting relays such as relay FF and the drop-away
time of relay SC is likewise comparatively long. 10.
Associated with the line repeating relays is a
bank of stepping relays, including relays IV, 2V,
3V, together with a half-step relay VP. This
bank ofstepping relays is for the'purpose of
marking oiT the successive steps of each cycle, the 15. 1
stepping relays being successively picked up dur
ing the “o?’fperiods and relay VP being shifted
10 station and it ‘will be understood that additional
lamps of this type may be provided as‘required.
A plurality of code jumpers are selected by the
circuits controlled by the CD relays and those
illustrated by reference characters ;I0 and II,
selected by the illustrated ‘CD relay in Fig. 1C,
are for the purpose of applying a station select
ing code to the line circuit in response to the
initiation of the operation of the system when
,
the CD relay is picked up.
Code sending relays PC and NC‘ are for the
in position during each “on” period.
‘
Control cycle relay C is provided for marking
a cycle of operations for the transmission of con-‘ 202"
purpose of providing the proper polarity of en- 1 trols, this relay being'picked up during the in
ergization of the line circuit during the trans- ’' itiating period of acontrol cycle and remaining up
until the “clearing out” period at the end of such
mission of control impulses. With relay PC ener
gized and relay NC deenergized a (+) impulse a cycle. Field station control relay CF is for the 255':
is applied to the line circuit from battery LB purpose of marking a cycle of operations for the
when‘the impulsing relays'effect the closure of > transmission of indications, this relay being
the line circuit. Withrelay PC deenergized and picked up during the‘ initiating period of a cycle
relay NC energized, then a (—) impulse is ap-‘ for the transmission of indications and‘ remain
plied to the line circuit upon the closure of the ing up until the “clearing out” period of such a 30.1
cycle.. During a duplex cycle, when controls and‘
. line circuit by the impulsing relays. , Code send
ing relay LG is for the purpose of rendering a indications are both being transmitted, relays
time space comparatively long in duration, when ' C' and CF are both picked up. Relay FPA're
' this relay is picked up. If relay LG is not picked peats the deenergized conditions of relay FP, that .
up at a particular step of the ‘cycle, then the is, relay FPA‘ is picked upduring each deenergiza 35.1
tion‘of relay FF and is dropped-out at each ener
35 time space is comparatively short in duration.
Pilot relays lPT to 4PT inclusive are polar re- 1 gization of relay FP, during a cycle of operations.
,
'A vacuum tube detecting device is illustrated in i
‘ lays of the magnetic stick type and'are positioned
the upper portion of Fig. 1B and is for the pur- ‘
in accordance with a' station identifying ‘code
received in the control of?ce during a duplex cycle
pose of detecting alternating current impulses
’ superimposed on the line circuit and for trans
40 or a cycle during which indications alone are be
40.;
lating ‘these impulses into direct current impulses
ing transmitted. A polar relay of the magnetic
stick type operates itscontacts to normal and re
verse positions in response to current of normal
for operating the MFZ and MBZ relays in a '
manner which will be fully described. This detect
and reverse directions respectively through its , ing device comprises vacuum tubes IVT and 2VT
winding and the contacts are magnetically main- ‘' with their associated in-put transformers IIT and
tained in their last operated position after'the' ZIT respectively. Out-put transformer‘ IOT in
winding is deenergized. Relays 1\_/lF, MFZ, and the out-put of tube 2VT has its secondary con
MBZ are the indication code receiving relays , ' nected to the MBZ and MFZ relays through recti
which are conditioned during the steps of‘a cycle ?ers IRC and 2RC. Various resistances, induct
during which indications are transmitted.‘ Relay ' ances and‘ condensers are included in the line
50 i
and vacuum tube circuits, the purpose of which
will be ‘evident from the following description.‘ It
alternating current is superimposed on the line - is assumed that the ?laments of thevacuum tubes
circuit during the “on” period at each step and ; are energized from a source of battery AB and
the plates are energized from a source of bat
55 relay MBZ registers whether or not alternating
current is superimposed on the line circuit during tery'BB, although it will be obvious that a power
transformer may be used for energizing these
the “off” period at each step.
>
‘
Impulse relays l E to 5E, inclusive, are for the tube circuits by the usual recti?ed current ar
purpose of timing the closure and opening of the ' rangement if desired.
Field station equipment.—'1'he ?eld station il 60."
60 line circuit during a cycle of operations. Relay I
MF registers the length of the “on” indication at
‘ each step, relay MFZ registers whether or‘ ‘not
0C is a cycle controlling relay, being picked’ up ‘ lustrated in Figs. 2, 2A, and 2B is typical ofall
stations of the system and may be adapted for
at‘the start of any cycle and. maintained picked
up until the end of the cycle, the purpose of ' use at the ?rst, second or any other location by
merely altering certain code jumpers to arrange
which will be pointed out later in the descrip
for the desired codes. For convenience in the
Line relay F is included in the line circuit description, this ?eld station has been speci?cal
at the ‘control office and is for the purpose of ‘ ly illustrated as being the ?rst of the series by _
repeating each energization and deenergization of reason of the distinctive exponents employed.
Likewise the end statio-nillustrated in Fig. 2B-is
‘ the line from battery LB, irrespective of the‘po
70 larity of such energization. Line repeating‘ relay assumed to‘ be the second in the series by reason
FP repeats each energization of relay F after a of the distinctive exponents employed, but it will
cycle of operations is initiated, but does not re- ' be understood that other stations maybe inter
tion.
‘
_
_
peat the normal energization of line’ relay F i posed between the control o?iceand the ?rst sta-,
' when the system is in its condition of rest. tion and between the?rst station ‘and the second ;
Slow-acting'relays SA, SB, and SD are picked up
station.
'
.
4- ‘
2,114,001 ‘
‘A track'section-is illustrated'ini Fig. 2B,‘ hav-“_ cycle of operations is ‘initiated from a ?eld,
ing track switches ITS and ZTS which are oper- "
ated from one extreme locked‘pcsition to the
For the purpose of illustrating the manner of
other by means of switch machines 13M? and determining when a ?eld station is to transmit
5;, ZSM respectively.
its indications, lock-out relay. L01 is employed. 5 .
station.
Switch'machine .I'SM is operated by switch
'
'
When relay L01 is picked up during a cycle ‘of
ope‘ratio‘ns’to permit the ?eld station to trans
mit, the impulses applied-to the line circuit (in the
machine ccntrol‘relay ISMR and switch ma
chine 2SM is :operated by switch machine con
trol relay-23MB}. These'control relays are of the
control of?ce) are left normally long or are made
maitwo-positio‘n polar magnetic 'stick type and are
governed from the control o?ice through‘ the
abnormally short by the ?eld station relay PF". 10
During the transmission of indications the pick
medium of the communication‘ system herein dis
ing up of relay L01. is also effective to permit
closed. Two control. relays areillustrated for
the purpose of indicating how two track switches
the control of indication transmitting relays'FZl
and BZ1 in accordance with whether or not'al
15‘u'may be controlled at a single step of the step- i ternating current is to be allowed to ?ow over 15
ping bank. 'These switch control relays control the line circuit to the control of?ce or whether it
the operation 'of the associated switch machines is to be shunted away from the line circuit lead
by energizing their normal ‘or reverse operating ing to the control o?ice by a shunt provided at
wires from a'local source of current,v it being as
the transmitting ?eld station. Relay PF1 con
zoiisumed that veach switch‘ma'chine is operated to verts a normally long direct current impulse 20
its normal locked-position when'the. polar con-' " applied by‘the o?ice to the control line circuit,
'tacts of the associated‘s'witch ‘control relay are to an abnormally short impulse in accordance
actuated to the'right and ‘when these contacts with indications to be transmitted from a station
are acuated to the left the associated switch" ma
marked by relay LO1 being picked up.
251fchine>is operated to its reverse locked position.
-Relays 'PT1 and PB1 control the continuity of 25
It will be understoodthat this control preferably ' the line circuit for purposes which will be de
includes suitable: approach locking means and
scribed in‘ detail. A ?lter, comprising inductances
2IN1, MN“ and condensers 2C1 and 1C1, is'con
usually employed in practice, but which are not ' nected in ‘the line circuit and is for the purpose
ao'llshown in the presentdisclosure for the sake of" of preventing or permitting the ?ow of alternat- 30
simplicity.
’
such other vautomatic signalling circuits as ‘are
Suitable signals (not shown) are associated
' ing current over the line circuit to the o?lce in
with the illustrated track switches for governing
traffic thereover and are provided with auto-T
351 matic signalling means interrelating traf?c over
the track switch with such other sections of
track and traf?c ‘controlling devices as may be
associated therewith. ‘These signals are likewise
governed from the control of?ce through the
40'1imedium of the communication‘system by signal
control relays, not shown. ‘Such signal control
accordance with whether the code being trans
mittedrequiresor does not require‘thetransmis
sion of alternating current. Certain resistances,
inductances and condensers are also provided at 3:)
the ?eld station; the purpose of which will be
pointed out in detail.
It is believed that the nature of the invention,
its» advantages and characteristic features will
best beunderstood with further description being 40
set forth from the standpoint of operation.
relays may be operated in a manner similar to .
Operation
the operation of the switch control relays, as
later described.
'
The system of the present invention is normal
'
451:, For the purpose of‘ illustrating how indications.
are transmitted by timing the “on” periods of a
cycle and by superimposing ‘alternating current
ly in a condition of rest, from which it may be 45
initiated'into a cycle of operations either from
the control of?ce or from any one of the ?eld
on the line circuit during‘the“‘on” and “off” ‘ stations when there are new controls or new in
periods, code jumpers 2H), 21 I, H2, and 2l3 are
?dcrprovided.
dications, respectively, ready to be transmitted.
For the purpose of illustrating how - If new controls for several di?erent ?eld sta- 5‘, _
indications are transmitted from a registered
station, track relay TR. and signal repeating-re;
lay M are illustrated.
,
'
The communication part of the system includes
tions' are ready for-transmission at substantially
- the same time, they are transmitted on separate
cycles, one station for each cycle. Similarly, if
several ?eld stations have indications ready for
55i2polar. line relay F1 and its quick~acting repeating ' transmission at the same time, they are trans- 5
relay FPI. Slow-acting relays SA1 and‘ 8131- ‘are
for a purpose similar toithat explained in con-,
nection with corresponding relays in the control
o?ice, these relays being picked‘ up atthe-begin
earning of a cycle of operations, maintainedpicked
mitted from such ?eld stations to the control
of?ce, one station for each cycle.
'It- may ‘happen that there are new controls
and new indications ready to be transmitted at
the same time and in such instances controls are (,0
up throughout the cycle and dropped out during ‘ transmitted to a selected ?eldstation simultane
the “clearing-out” period at the end of the cycle.
The ?eld station includes a bank of stepping
relays, comprising relays IVI, 2V1, 3V1, and VP?
ously with‘ the transmission of indications from
the same or some other ?eld station during the
same
cycle.
I
_
‘
65>':which correspcndto similar relays in‘the con
Irrespective of whether a cycle isto be for the '65
trol c?‘ice. These relays are operated by circuits ' transmission of controls and/or the transmis
similar to the circuits for corresponding relays sion of indications,_a predetermined number of
in the control office and in synchronism there
impulses areplaced upon the line circuit to ac- ‘
with, therefore it is believed unnecessary to illus-' " complish the step-by-step operation of the step
matrate‘thedetailedcircuits of the ?eld static
stepping relay bank.
1
For the purpose of illustrating the selection of
a stationfor the transmission of controls, relay
SO and relay 808- have been shown. A?eld
ping relay banks. These impulses are time-v ,70
spaced, that is, they are separated by time spaces
andthe lengths- of these time spaces are varied
in>=accordance with the control code to be trans
mitted.
During’ an indication cycle when ‘no
75zx=change relay CH is shown to illustrate how. a controls are being transmitted the time spaces 75;__
2,114,091
of relay CF, conductor 39, NCi-bus 40 and wind
between impulses are all comparatively short. ~I ing
of relay NC to (-—). vvRelay SC in the con
When a cycle is‘ initiated for the transmission trol of?ce is normally energized over an obvious
of controls the character of the impulses placed circuit completed at back contact M of relay SB.
upon the line circuit is determined in accordance
'At the station, relay PT1 is normally energized I
with the station to be selected and the controls over a circuit extending from (+), contact 222
- to be transmitted.v The lengths ‘of the time spaces
of relay F1 in its left hand position, back contact
and the character of the impulses aredetermined v223
of relay SE1 and winding of relayPT1 to
by code jumpersxfor selecting the station and
<(—). Relay 01-1 at the ?eld station is assumed
. control levers for transmitting controls to the
to be normally energized over a circuit not shown 10
1:10 selected station.
During acycle of operations‘ initiated for the and it will be assumed‘ that this relay is de
transmission of indications‘ alone, the character
of the impulses placed upon the line circuit and
the lengths of the spaces between impulses are
~15 such that no station will be selected, these im
pulses merely causing the step-by-step operations
of the control of?ce stepping relay bank and the
particular ?eld station stepping relay bank which
is transmitting. A series of impulses which
selects no station for an out-bound call is re
ferred to as a control phantom code. Such a»
code in the present embodiment comprises one
‘ or more (—) impulses and one or more normally
short-time spaces, the number of which is de
termined by the vnumber of station selection
‘ 3.25
steps.
I
‘
When a cycle of operations is initiated from a‘
?eld station for the transmission of indications,
a plurality of impulses are, placed upon the line
130 circuit in the control of?ce to cause the step
by-step operations of the stepping relay banks
and these impulses are made normally long or
energized when the ‘associated ?eld station has,
new indications to transmit. Track relay TR.
(Fig. 2A) is illustrated in its picked up position,
it being assumed that the track section with 15
which it is associated is unoccupied. Relay M
is shownpicked up, it being assumed that all
signals associated with the illustrated track sec
tion are ‘at stop.
“
Manual start.-—-With the system in a condi-s
20 "
tion of rest it may be manually initiated into a
cycle for the transmission of controls.
When
ever such a cycle is desired the operator ?rst
positions the control levers for the ?eld station
which he desires to‘ select and then actuates? 25
the-starting button associated with, this 'station._
For the purpose of considering the operation
of the present system it ‘will be assumedv that
levers ISM'L and 2SML are actuated to their nor
mal positions‘ (as indicated) for operating the; 30
associated track switches (Fig. 2B) to their nor
mal locked positions and that starting button
STB is actuated to start the cycle of operations.
[abnormally shortrto make up a'portion of the The actuation of button STB causes relay‘ CD
code ‘determined by the-?eld station transmit .to be picked up and stuck up until the end of. 35
3335 ting and in accordance with indications to be ‘the 'cycle. ,The actuation'oi button STB also
transmitted from- the station which is trans
applies (+) to C bus 42, which causes current
‘ mitting.
In addition to theglength of the im
flow over this bus, back contact d3 of .relay ‘
pulses, the indication code is further made up ‘to
00, back contact 44 of relay SB and lower wind
,by the transmitting ?eld station permitting or ing of relay C to (—‘) . . Relay C is picked up and 40
4o preventing alternating current ?ow over the line
closes a stick circuit for itself extending from
- circuit to the‘control o?‘ice. Alternating current
(+), front contact 45 of relay SC, front contact
is superimposed on the line circuit at the end 46
and upper winding of relay C to (—). The
station in one embodiment and at the transmit .picki‘ng up of relay C prevents the energiza
‘‘‘ ting station in the other embodiment.
tion of relay CF, after the start of'this‘ cycle, by’.v 45
Normal at rest conditions.--The two-wire line
1~ 45
»
is normally energized over a circuit which may opening back contact 41.3
The picking up of relay C closes a circuit
be traced from the (+) terminal of battery LB for picking up relayv 00 which extends from
(Fig. 1A), back contact 20 of relay PC, front (+), back contact 36 of relay SD, front ‘con
‘ ' contact 2'! of relay 'NC, conductor 22, inductance
tact. 31 of relay C and winding vof relay O0 to.‘ 50
lIN, return line conductor R, inductance lINl, 0-).’ The picking up of relay '0 de-energizes
‘ 50
return conductor R1, back contact 3230f relay relay NC by opening the above described normal
' L02, secondary Winding of ‘transformer TF2, back
’ contact 32!] of relay PF2, back contact 32! of relay
‘ PR2, inductances 3IN‘2 and 211812 in series, winding
relay F2, line conductor L1, back contact 220
55 ‘of
of relay PFl, back contact 22! of relay PBl, wind
‘‘ings of inductances 3IN1'and 2IN1 in series, wind
' ing-of relay F1, line conductor LQinductance ZIN,
winding of relay F, conductor I58, back contact
of relay IE, back contact‘3l‘of relay 2E, back
co 30
contact 32 of relay 4E, back contact 33 of relay
LG, front contact 34 of relay NC and back con
‘ tact 35 of relay PC to the (-—) terminal of bat
tery LB. The current flow in this direction will
energizing circuit at back contact 31. The open- ‘
ing of back contact 43 of relay 00‘ opens the
above described pick-up circuit of relay C‘, so. 55
that the energization of this relay is held off
at the end ‘of the cycle forv purposes which will
be later described.
\
.
“
"
A» circuit is now closed for pickingiup ,relay
PC which extends from (+), front contact'48. 60
of relay 00, front contact 49 of relay‘C,‘ back
contact 5| of relay 3V, back contact 52 ofrelay
2V, back contact 53 of relay IV, vPC bus 54 and
winding ‘of relay PC to (-—). The dropping of
relay NC and the picking up of relay PC changes,
energization of the line circuit from (--) to
tive to maintain relay F in its picked up posi ‘ the
(+) by means of. pole-‘changing contacts 20, 2|,
" tion and relays F1 and F2 with their polar con
34‘, and 35 of these relays. This change in po
tacts positioned to the left." It will be under
larity lof energization of the line circuit mo
stood that the polar contacts of line relays at ' mentarily drops relay F, which‘ is again imme-;, 70
other stations connected to‘ the communication diately picked‘ up and is ineffective. ‘This re
system will likewisehave their polar contacts po
energization of the line ‘circuit reverses the posi
sitioned to ‘the left;
"
>
I
tions of the polar contacts of the line relays
‘ Relay NC is normally energized over a circuit
at the stations from their left hand positions
extending from (+), back contact 36 of relay '-to their right hand dotted positions. Relay 3E;_
65
be conveniently referred‘ to as (—) and it is effec
70
SD, back Contact 31- of relay‘ C," back contact 38
6
“2,114,001
- is picked up over a’ circuit which extends from
(+), front‘contact 55 ‘off relay 0C, ‘conductor
I 6!),back contact- 56‘ of relay. 2E and-‘winding
of relay 3E to- (—).
'
I
Y
Acircuit isnow closed ‘for picking, up relay
all)
FP which extends-from (+), front contact 5'!
of relay ‘PC, conductor 58, front contact 59
of relay F vand winding of relay FP'to (—). A
circuit is now closed for picking up relay SA
which extends from (+) applied to conductor
58 over the above described. circuit and ex
tending through " front ‘contact 60' of relay FP
to the winding of relay SA. A circuit is closed
for picking up relay SB which extends from
. (+), front contact‘ 6| of relay SA and wind
ing ‘of relay SB ‘to (—). Relay SB opens the
normally energized circuit for relay SC ‘at back
contact 4I;' which causes the de-energization
of relay SC.
Another stick circuit is closed for
means'o-f this. stick circuit‘ and'the one‘in mul
tiple with contact: 8 completed‘ atv front contact
‘I, of; relay ‘5E. ;
' Thepicking up .;of relay. 2E opens the above
described‘energizing circuit for= relay 3E at back
contact 56, which :drops relay 3E and a cir
cuit is closed for picking up‘relay 4E which ex
tendsgfroml(+), back contact 'IB of relay 3E,
back contact ‘I’! 'ofé‘relay MF, conductor I33,
front contact 18 of relay FP, conductor I64 and 10
winding of relay 4E to (~). Relay 4E ‘closes a
vstick circuit for itself whichextends from. (+) ,
back contactcl?fof relay 3E," front contact 19
and winding of relay 4E to ,(~c). Relay 4E closes
an obvious pick-up circuit for relay SE at front’ 15
contact 80'.
The picking up‘ of relay 4E opens the line
circuit at back contact ‘32 which de-energizes'
the line and allows relay F to drop. The drop
20' relay C at front contact 93‘ of relay SB, which =ping of .relay F ‘causes the dropping of relay:
is effective before relay. SC drops and opens
its front'contact 45.
FP by opening front contact 59. The dropping
20
of relay FP closes a second stick circuit for
Relay SD is picked up‘ over an obvious circuit ' relay VP which extends from (+), front con
closed at back contact 62‘ of-relay SC. vThe tact 65. of-relay. SD, back contact 66 of relay
closure of, front contact 63 of relay SB applies F’P, frontycontact 8| and winding of relay VP?‘
25
energy to the plate circuits of the vacuum' tubes
to (—).
and since this relay is maintained in its 'picked
A circuit is now closed for picking up relay
up position throughout the following cycle, the
IV which extends‘from (+), back contact 82
plate‘circuits are maintained ‘energized during of relay FP, front contact 83 of" relay SD, front
30 the cycle. The» picking :up of-relay SD opens
contact 84 of relay VP, back contact 85 of relay‘
the ‘pick-up circuit for relay CF at'back con
2V’ and winding of relay IV to (—). Relay IV
tact“ for the purpose of holding off the pick
closes a stick circuit for itself ‘which extends
ing up of relay CF until all of the relays have from (+), front contact 86 of relay SD, front
been restored to normal at the end of the cycle.
contactv 8'! and Winding of relay IV to (—).
The opening of back contact 44 of 'relay SB also
Since front contact 4I- of relay SB is closed,.. 35
opens ‘the above‘ described pick-up circuit for - it will be obvious" that the,‘ intermittent closing
relay C so that the pick-up'ioperation-of this and, opening'of" back contact“ of relay FP
relay is held'off at‘ the end of the cycle for_,a ’ causes the intermittent energization and de-ener
purpose which will be later described.
7
- gization of relay FPA, but-‘since this operation
It will T be understood that ‘the intermittent
a
50
of; relay .FPAhas no function during a control
energization of relay SA by contact‘e??' ofrelay cycle, its operation at each step will not be 40
FT; supplemented‘ during a long “off” by ‘con ' pointed *out.
tact I2 of-relay‘ IE,‘ are at such a rate thatr'e
‘ The picking-up, of relay IV opens the above
lay SA‘does not have time ‘to drop out during described circuit of relay IE at back contact 13,
an voperating cycle; (+) ‘energy is‘ applied ‘to ~ which allows relay’ IE'to drop, which in‘turn
45
conductor 58 at front "contact 5 of relay SD to
de-energizes-relay 2E at open front contact 15.
supplement that‘ at contact 51-‘Ofr relay PC,'since. Relay 3E is now picked up because: of closed
contact 51‘ may not be“closed'during each “on”
back contact 56 of relay ‘2E and relay 4E is
dropped becauseof open back contact ‘I6 of
Stepping and impulsin'g operations-Relay VP relay 3E. Relay 5E is dropped because of open
'
isTp-icked up over" a circuit extending from (+),
front contact 80- of 'relay 4E.
front‘cont'act 65. of relay SD, front‘contact 66
It will be assumedv that the first impulse ap
of relayfFP, back contacts 61;~6B and 69 of re
plied to the line circuit is (—) (for reasons later
period.
'
'
lays 3V, 2V, and ~IV respectively and winding
of relay VP to (—).~ Relay VP‘ closes a ?rst
stick circuit for itself which extends from (+),
front contact 65~of relay~SD, front contact 10
of relay VP and over the ~remainderof. the
above described circuit‘ to the winding‘; of re
60
lay
‘
‘
‘
'
‘
" " Relay IE is now'ipicked- up over'a circuit ex
tending :from (+), front contact’ 65 of relay
' SD, back contacts 'II~,;72~ and 11,3’ of relays 3V,
2V, and‘ \IV respectively,' front contact "I4 of
relay
conductor NH‘, and winding of relay
lE-to (—-). 'Relay "2E is pickedup over an
described), thereforerelay NC will be assumed
picked up so that the line circuit is energized
when relay 4E drops and closes its back contact
“over a circuitincluding back- contacts 3I- and
30 of relays 2E and IE respectively to the wind
ing of relay F. This again‘ picks up relays F and
FF as previously described. Relay VP is now de
energized because its ‘?rst stick circuit is open at
back contact 69 of relay IV and its second stick
circuit is open at back contact 66 of relay FP.
The dropping of relay VP’ completes the above
described pick-up circuit for relay IE, which now
extends through front contact 13 of relay IV
60
obvious circuit closed‘ at front contact ‘I5 of _ and back contact ‘I4 of relay VP and the picking
relay IE. The picking up‘ of relay SD’ opens . up of relay IE ‘effects the picking up of relay 2E,
I the above described pick-up circuit'for relay j the dropping of relay 3E and the picking up of
70 0C, but before 00 has'time'to release, a stick
relays 4E and 5E in the manner previously de-. 70
circuit is closed from (+), front contact 36 scribed.
_
of'relay SD, front contact 9 of relay 00, con
The picking up of relay 4E opens the line cir
ductor I62, front contact 8 of relay 2E, con
cuit at back contact 32 and the de-energization
ductor I63. and- winding of relay O0 to (~-).
of the- line effects the'dropping of relays F and
Relay 0C. is heldv up throughout i the cycle by FF. A circuit is; now closed for picking up relay
:27
.12,114,oo1
‘2V [which extends from (+') , back contact 82 of ~ ingout” period because relay SBiopens its front
contact 93 before relay SC closes its front contact
relay FP, front contact 83.0f relay SD, back con
tact 84 of relay VP, back contact 89 of relay 3V, 45, ‘which-is effective to open the stick circuit for
front contact 90 of relay IV and winding of relay relay/C fora period of time sufficient to dropout
‘this relay. The dropping of relay SD opens the .,5
2V to (—). Relay 2V closes an obvious stick cir
cuit for itself at its front contact 9|.‘ The open ~- energizing circuit for‘ relay IE at front contact
ing of back contact ‘I2 of relay'2V de-energizes ' 65, which allows relay IE to-release, after ‘which
‘relay IE,‘ which in turn effects the dropping of relay 2E‘ is'released, relay 3E is picked up and
relays 4E and'5E are dropped out in the manner
relay 2E, the picking up of relay 3E ‘and the droppreviously described.
a‘
"
I
Y. 10
~
‘
1.1v 10 ping of relays 4E and- 5E.
' The droppingv of. relay? SD de-energizes'the
Relay 4E closes up the line circuitat its back
contact 32 and it will be assumed that relay PC stick circuits of the stepping relays at. open front
contact"85 which effects the dropping of these
is in, its picked up position for applying a (+)
impulse to the line circuit at this time. The (+) ‘ relays. The dropping of ‘relay SD also opens the
stick circuit of relay DC at front contact '35 15
15 energy applied to the line circuit effects the pick
a
which
effects the‘dropping of relay 0C. Relay
ing up of relays F and PP and relay VP is now
picked up over a circuit extending from (+), ' 3E: is de-energized by the‘ opening of frontcon
f. 3.120
front contact 65 of relay SD, front contact 66 ‘of
relay FP, back‘contact 61 of relay 3V, front con
tact -68 of relay 2V and winding of relay VP to
(—). Relay VP again closesits firstv stick cir
tact 55 of relay’OC. The dropping of relay SD'
completes the above ‘described pick-up circuit for
relay NC at'b‘ack contact_'38, so‘ that relay NC 'is'1‘20- ‘
picked up for‘applying (—) e'nergyto the line
Relay ‘IE is now . circuit, which in turn picks up relay F and the
_
energized because of closed front contact ‘I2 of system is placed in its normalcondition.
I Selection of control code.—'I‘he step-by-step
relay 2V and closed front contactv 14 of relay VP
cuit as previously described.
5325 and relay IE in turn effects the picking up ‘of
relay 2E, the dropping of relay 3E and the pick
ing up of relays 4E and 5E in a manner previous
ly described. -
'
1
Relay 4E opens up the line circuit at back con
7 @230
and impulsing operations, effective in‘ response‘ 25
to the initiation of the system fromzthe control
office, have been pointed ‘out and it'k'was assumed
' that'these impulses applied to the line circuit
were. of certain polarities; ‘It will noW' be ex
plained how thesepolarities are: determined and‘1'30
tact 32 and the de-energiz'ation of the line cir
‘cuit effects the dropping of relays F and PP. The also how the lengths of the time spaces between
above described second stick circuit for relay VP / impulses are determinedall in accordance with
is now completed and a pick-up circuit is com
pleted for relay 3V which extends from (+),
.535 ‘back contact 82 of relay FP, front contact 83 of
‘relay SD, front contact 84 of relay VP,‘ front
contact 85 of relay 2V and winding of relay 3V
to (—). Relay 3V closes‘an obvious stick circuit
for itself at its front contact 92.
'
‘
,
Relay IE is now de-energized because of open
back contact 'II and this relay effects in turn the
de-energization of relay 2E‘, the energization of
the code to be transmitted.
_
‘
When the system is initiatedv as ‘above ‘de
scribed, the normally energized line is‘ changed535
from a (—) to a (+) energization for condition
ing the various circuits. ” It will be assumed that
code jumpers I0 and II and the switch machine
levers ISML and 2SML of Fig. 1C are in‘the positions
illustrated.
~
‘
.
I
I
'
,
"-40
~ 'Jumper II connect'ed‘as shown ‘determines that
the first “off” period (following the conditioning‘
“on”’period) will be comparatively long; This is
5E. The dropping of relay'lIE. again energizes the effected by the picking up of relay LG'when ‘re
E45 line circuit by closing back contact 32 and it I lay: IV is picked up‘ in the'?rst “off” period,‘ overil45
will be assumed that relay‘ NC is picked up for a circuit extending from’(+), frontc'o'ntact 11.8
making the next impulse (—) . The energization of relay OC, front ‘contact‘49 of relay C, front
contact 50 of relay VP, back contact 23_ of relay
; of the line circuit e?ects the picking up- of relays
relay 3E and the de-energization of relays 4E and
F and PP and the droppingv of relay VP in a man
‘ 2V, front ‘contact 24 of ‘relay IV, conductor "25, '
contact ‘I4, which is’ completed through‘ front
contact 'II of relay 3V. Relay 2E is now picked
up, relay 3E is dropped and relays 4E and 5151
of’ relay‘5E to ('-). The'Ydropping of relay ‘4E
and the closure of its‘b'ack contact 32 during the
2E picked up. Relay-3E is down and relays 4E
closes its ‘back contact 33.
.50 ner previously described. The dropping of relay ‘ front contact 26_ of 'relay CD, jumper II, LGbusii??
21‘,v winding of relay LG, and-front contact v328
- VP closes the pick-up circuit for relay IE‘at back
?rst “off” period is ineffective to energize the ‘line '
are picked up in the manner previously described. Y circuit because “of, open back contact 33 of relay-'55
The picking up of relay 4E again de-energizes - LG. When relay 5E drops during the ?rst “off”
the line circuit, which effects the'dropping of re~ fperiod'the vabove describedlcircuit for relay LG
lays F and FF. Since there are no more stepping "is opened at front contact 28, which allows relay ,
relays to be picked up, the energizing circuit for I LG to drop ‘away, but‘ since this relay‘ is of the
relay IE is not interrupted and this relay remains slow release type, a comparatively long interval‘:60
'
in its picked up position for maintaining relay -of time will be measured off before relay \‘L‘G
‘and 5E are up and stay up for a comparatively
~
-
When back contact as is closed the line-‘is en
long interval of time which effects the clearing "ergized to mark the end of the ?rst_“o_if” period
- but in this instancethe‘ ?rst “off” period is rein-i165
‘
~
During this “clearing out” period, relay SA is dered comparatively long. ' In the event that
jumper II is‘in its alternate dotted‘ line position,
dropped because front contact 60 of‘ relay FP re
out of the system.
relay‘ LG is not picked up and the/line circuit is
dropping of relay SA effects the dropping of relay energized by the closure of back contact 32 when
relay 4E drops, which? render's'the ?rst “91f”? 70
70 SB because of open front‘contact 6|, the'drop
ping of relay SB effects the picking up of relay v‘period comparatively vshort.
The polarity of the ?rst “on” impulseffollow
SC because of closed back contact 4I= and the
picking up of relay SC effects ‘the dropping of in'g‘the first “off” period) is‘ determined’by ‘the
position of jumper Ill. 'With'j'umper I0 in‘the
relay SD because of open back contact 62.‘
mains open for an extended period of time. The
‘Relay . C is de-energized during the “clear
position shown, relay ‘NC is picked up during thei~75
'8
2,114,001
?rst “oif’i period, when relay IVpicks upv to de
pulse-for conditioning purposes when the cycle
energize the previously described‘ circuit forre > is initiated from the control o?ice, with the fol
lay PC at- back contact 53. The pick-up circuit lowing impulses being (+) or (—) and the time
for relay NC extends from (+) ,front contact 48 spaces between these impulses being long or short,
of relay 00, front contact 49 of relay C, back dependent upon the code jumper and control lever 5
contacts 5| andw52 of relays 3V- and 2V respec
connections ‘as rendered e?ective by the particu
tively, front. contact 53 ofrelay IV, conductor lar code determining relay which is picked up for
29, front contact I9 of relay 'CD, jumper Iliand that cycle.
,
'
Winding of relay NC to ~(——) . With relay NC up
Station'selectionjor czmtroZs.—-It will be ob
“10 and with relay PC down the pole-changing con
vious that the impulses and the time spaces be- 10
- tacts. 20, 2|, 34 and 35 e?ectthe-application'o-f a ,tween impulses are, received at all ‘of the ?eld
(—) impulse to the line circuit.
In ‘the event
that jumper: Ill-is in its alternate dotted linepo
sition, then the above described circuit extends
“15 through the winding of relay PC instead of‘relay
NC,',which would pick up relay PC and prevent
the picking up of relay NC, thus resulting in a
(+), impulse being applied to the line circuit.
It will thus be seen that the code sending re
--20 lays are positioned upon the picking up of the
stations, since the ?eld station line relays are all
included in-the line circuit However,for con
venience in describing the operation of station se
lection, reference will be made to Figs. 2, 2A, and 15
2B which illustrate a typical ?eld station some
what in detail vand which for conveniencegis con
sidered to be the ?rst station of the series and
selected’ by the code applied to the line circuit as
previously explained, which code is, ?rst “off’i'20
stepping relays during the “off” periods, while long and ?rst “on” (—). The 'illustrated‘?eld
the line circuit is de-energized, in readiness for station is rendered responsive to this particular
energizing the line, with the selected polarity at ' c'ode because of the connections of jumpers 290,
thebeginning of the next “on” period. Although 2M, and‘ 202 as illustrated.
25 it is assumed that the station is selected on a
single step in the present embodiment, thus re
quiring only code jumpers I0 and vII, it will be
understood that in systems of larger capacity ad
ditional. code‘ jumpers will be provided and se
The conditioning (+) impulse applied to thet25
line circuit actuates the polar contacts of relay
F1 to the right. A circuit is now closed for pick
ing up relays SO and SOS which extends from
(+),‘ back contact 203 of relay SE1, contact 204
@130 lected on one, or more additional steps of the step
of relay F1 in its-right hand dotted position, con-(4'30
I ping relay bank. The above typical example il
ductor I92, back contact 205 of relay L, back'con
lustrateshow the stationselecting code is applied 'tactsr-206,‘2Il:1 and 2Il8v of relays 3V1, 2V1, and
to the line so that any one of four separate codes
IV1 respectively and the upper windings of relays
are selectively applied for a single step of the SO and SOS in series to (—).
cycle. These codes are, ?rst, long “off” and (—)
A circuit is now closed for picking up relay FP1,<“=~35
“on”, second, short “01f” and (—) “on”, third, which extends from (+) , contact 222 of relay F1
long “off” and (+) “on” and fourth, short “off”
and (+) “on".
The code which is selected during the second
"40 “off” period in the present embodiment is deter
in its’ right hand dotted position; back contact
224>ofrelayLO1, conductor-I93, front contact 225
of relay SO, conductor I941 and winding of relay
FPl to (—) . Relay SA1 is picked up over an ob-i 40
mined by the positions of levers ISML and 2SML. 1 vious-vcirc’uit closed at front contact 226 of relay
~ With lever ISML in its normal position as illus
trated, relay PC is picked up during the second
“off” period (in order to make the second impulse
(+)) over a circuit extending from (+), front
contact 48 of relay OC, front contact 49 of relay
0, back contact 5| of relay 3V, front contact 52
of relay 2V, conductor I8, front contact I‘! of
’ relay CD, lever ISML in its normal position and
winding of relay PC to (—). In the event that
lever ISML is in its reverse dotted line position,
then relay NC is picked up to apply a (—~) impulse
to theline circuit during the second “on” period.
With lever 2SML in its normal position as il
1-55 lustrated, the second “off” period is rendered
short because relay LG is not picked up during
this “off” period, so that the line is energized
FP1 and relay SE1, is-picked up over an obvious
circuit closed at front contact 221 of relay SA1.
The picking up of relay SBl closes a stick circuit
for relay SO which extends from (+) , front con-L45
tact 203 of relay SE1, conductor I95, front contact
-2I4 ‘of'relay SOS, front contact 2I5 ‘and lower
winding of relay S0 to (—). A stick circuit is
also closed for relay SOS which extends from
(+), front contact 2030f relay SB1, front co -\ 50
tact 2I'I of- relay FPI, conductor I96, front con
tact 2I6-and lower winding of'relay SOS‘to (—) .
The picking up of relay SO applies (+) byway of
_ itsfront contact 299 and conductor I8I to con
tact, 294 of relay F1 to replace the (+) which is1 55
opened at back contact 203 of relay SB1. This
(+) at front contact 2090f relay S0 is applied
to mark the beginning of the second“on’,’ period > to the selecting circuit for this relay as will be
when relay 4E drops to close back contact 32. later-pointed out, so that the dropping of an S0
In the event that lever 2SML is in its reverse
dotted line position, then relay LG is picked up
over a circuit extending from (+) , front contact
48 of relay 00, front contact 49 of relay C, back
contact 59 of relay VP, back contact I6 of relay
1:65 3V, front contact I5 of relay. 2V, conductor I4,
front contact I3 of relay CD, lever ZSML in its
reverse dotted line position, winding of relay LG
and front contact 28 of relay SE to (—) .
In this
case relay LG maintains the line circuit open for
a comparatively long interval of time to provide
a long “01f” period between the ?rst and second
impulses in the same manner as previously ex
plained in connection with the ?rst “off” period.
From the above it will be seen that the impulses
@75 applied to the line circuit begin with a ,(+) im
relay during a cycle rules out the particular sta- 60
tion with which this SO relay is associated, be
cause the. original pick-up circuits for the SO
relays extend through back ‘contacts of the SB
relays, such as back contact 293.
It will be understood that the intermittent en- 65
ergization of relay SA1¢by contact 226 of relay
FPI, supplemented during a long “off” by contact
I89 of relay T, are at such a rate that relay SA1
,does not have time to drop out during an oper
ating cycle. It .will also be understood that the 70
?rst ‘impulse (conditioning “on” impulse) is
somewhat longer than the remaining impulses
of the cycle so that relays SA1 and SE1 have time
to- pick up during the time that theline circuit
is energized. Itwill further, be understood that -;75
2,114,001
similar circuits are‘ established at all other ?eld
stations for picking, up the associated SO and
SOS relays and that‘the same operations take
place at these other stations during the condi
tioning “on” period. a The S0 relays are dropped
' at these‘other stations during the station selec
9
turn picks up relay FP1. The picking up of relay
FPl closes the above described stick circuit for
relay L at front contact 229 so that this relay is
maintained picked up throughout the ?rst “on”
period. The picking up of relay FPl again closes
the pick-up circuit for relay T at front contact 2 I 9
tion portion of the code and maintained picked
and relay T opens the pick-up circuit of relay L
up at the illustrated station in response to the
at back contact~228, but because of the fact that
assumed station selecting code.
relay L was picked up during the ?rst long “off” period it is maintained stuck up throughout the 10
.
At the illustrated station, relay FP1 repeats
the operations of relay F1 over the above de~
scribed‘pick-up circuit, including front contact
next (?rst) “on” period. It will be apparent that
a short “off” period would not permit the drop
ping of relay T because. the drop-away time of
this relay is longer than a short “0155” period.
225 of relay SO, when contact 222 of relay F1
is in its right hand dotted position. When con
15; tact 222 is in its left hand position the energiz ‘ When relay T is not permitted to drop during an 15
ing circuit for relay ‘f‘Pl extends through front “off” period (short), then after relay L is dropped‘
by the opening of front contact 229 of relay FPl,
contact 223 of relay SE1. During the condition
ingl“on” period, relay VP1 is picked up over a it cannot be again picked'up during this “off”
circuit which is not shown but which is similar period so‘ that it is maintained in its dropped
away position throughout the next “on” period. 20
20 to the pick-up circuit for relay VP in the con
From the above it will be observed that relay
trol of?ce.
.
Relay T is picked up during the conditioning T detects the length of an “off” period by drop
ping during a long “off” and remaining picked
“on” period over a circuit which extends from
up during a short “off”, and that relay L stores.
(-]-),'front contact 2|8 of relay SE1, front con
tact 219 of relay FPI, conductor I9‘! and winding this detected condition throughout the succeed 25
of relay T to (—). ‘ RelayT is somewhat slow in
picking‘up so that a circuit is effective for pick
‘
ing up relay L before relay T picks up, which
circuit extends from (+), front contact 2| 8 of
30.1 relay SB1, conductor I98, back contact 228 of re
lay T and winding of relay L to (—). Relay L
closes a stick circuit for itself which extends.
from (+), front contact 2l8 of relay SE1, front
contact 229 of relay FPl, conductor I99, front
‘ contact 236 and winding‘ of relay L to (—).
When the line circuit is deenergized to mark
the end of the conditioning “on” period and the
beginning of the ?rst “off” period, the polar con
tacts of relay F1 (and of course the polar contacts
~40, of the line relays at all other stations) are re
stored to their neutral positions. The opening
of contact 222 of relay F1 drops relay FP1 which
is effective to pick up relay IVl over a circuit
which is not shown but which is similar to the
corresponding circuit in the control office.
Relay S0 is stuck up during the ?rst “off” pe
riod by means of a circuit closed at back contact
2! ‘l of relay FP1, which circuit extends from (-|-) ,
front contact 203 of relaySB1, back contact 2H of
relay FPl, conductor I80, front contact 215 and
5.0: lower
winding of relay S0 to (—). Relay SOS is
deenergized when relay F‘Pl is dropped during the
?rst “off” period because of open front contact
211 of relay PP and because of open contact 2%
of relay F1.
_
.
The dropping of relay FPl during the ?rst “off”
period effects the dropping of relay L because
of open front contact 229 of relay FPl, since
back contact 228 of relay T is also open.
6.0..
The
opening of front contact 2H3 of relay FP1 deen
ergizes relay T,‘ but since this relay is slow releas
ing'it will maintain its contacts picked up for a
comparatively long interval of time. Since the
?rst “off” period is long and since the drop-away
time of relay T is less than the length of a long
“off”- period, relay T will drop away beforethe
15,
ing “on” period by remaining picked up through
out the succeeding “on” in response to a preced
ing long “off” and remaining down throughout
the succeeding “on” in response to a preceding
30
short “off”.
The ?rst selection in response to the station
selection code is made during the ?rst “on” pe
riod when relay FP1 is picked up. In the exam
ple assumed the long “off” and (-) “on” code
closes a selecting stick circuit for relay SO! which 35
extends from (+), front contact 209 of relay SO,
conductor l8l, contact 204 of relay F1 in its left
hand position, conductor I 32, front contact 23I
of relay L, back contacts 232 and 233 of relays
3V1 and 2V1 respectively, front contact 234 of . 40
relay W1, code jumper 202 in its full line position
and upper windings of relays SO and SOS to
(—). It will be observed that jumper 202 in
its dotted line position would render the above
described selecting stick circuit for relay SO 45
incomplete so that this relay would be dropped
out when relay FP1 opened its back contact 2".
With the selecting stick circuit complete however,
relay S0 is maintained energized and relay SOS
is picked up and the stick circuit for relay SOS‘ 50
is again completed by way of front contact 2|‘!
of relay FPI. The picking up of relay SOS like
wise again completes the stick circuit for relay
SO by way of front contacts 2M and 2I5.
From the above it will be observed that a ?rst
code comprising a short “off” and a (+) “on”
will be ineffective to maintain relay SO energized
during the selecting period because of jumper
26!) not connecting to the SO relay circuit. Like
wise a ?rst code comprising a long “off” and a 60
(+) “on” will not energize relay SO because of
jumper 20! being in its open circuit position. It
will thus be apparent that relay S0 at the sta
tion to be selected is maintained energized by a
composite code made up of the polarity of the 65
?rst'impulse and the length of the time space
preceding this impulse as repeated by relays F1
line circuit is energized to mark the end of the
?rst “off”. period and the beginning of the ?rst
“on” period. The dropping of relay T closes a and L.
With the provision of two separate code jump 70
circuit at back contact 228 for again picking up
I ers in the'o?ice as illustrated, four different code.
relay L.
combinations are possible on the ?rst step of the
At the end of the ?rst “off” period and the
cycle, three of which may be employed for station
beginning of the ?rst “on” period the (—-) en
ergization of the line circuit causes relay F1 selection, with thefourthbeing used for the phan
to actuate its polar contacts to the left, which in e tom control code call. It is obvious that the sys 75
1O
2,114,001
term will transmit a normally short “off” and a
(—) “on” at the ?rst step if no CD relay in the
of?ce is picked. up as a result of the system being
initiated from a ?eld station. No Station must
be selected in response to this code and therefore
front contact 235 of relay IV1 is not connected
to a code jumper, since this contact is the one
selected by the phantom code when a single sta
tion code selecting step is provided. It will be
10 obvious that, in the event of two station select
ing steps, this front contact 235 will lead to a
jumper and the front contacts illustrated in con
nection with the four code circuits of relay 2V1
will be used to provide a total of 15 station selec
tion codes, that is 4X4 minus 1, the sixteenth
being the phantom code.
In the above example it will be obvious that
three stations may be- selected on a single step of
the system and that the second station will be
responsive to a long “off” and a (+) “on” code.
At this station the jumper corresponding to
jumper 2B! of Fig. 2A will be connected in its
lower position and the other two jumpers will
be in their upper positions. The third station
will be responsive to a short “off” and a (+) “on”
code and at this station the jumper correspond
ing to 200 will be in its lower position and the
other two jumpers will be in their upper positions.
It will be ovious that the long “off” and (+)
'“on” station selecting code will be determined
in the o?ice by two jumpers selected by the asso
ciated CD relay similar to jumpers I0 and II
of Fig. 1C, with the jumper similar to jumper Ill
being connected to the PC bus and with the
Lo Gt jumper similar to jumper I! being connected to
the LG bus. Likewise the short “off” and (+)
“on” code will be provided in the control o?ice by
having the jumper for this station, similar to
jumper I 0, being connected to the PC bus and the
40 jumper similar to jumper Ii being disconnected
from the LG bus.
The succeeding impulses of the cycle will be
effective to govern the control relays of the se
_
and upper winding of relay ISMR to (-). Cur
rent through the upper winding of this relay posi
tions its polar contact to the right for energiz
ing the normal circuit of switch machine ISM for
controlling the‘ position of track switch ITS- to
its normal position. In the event that lever ISML
is in its reverse dotted line position, then the
second impulse will be (—-) and relay F1 will close
a circuit at contact 204 in its left hand position,
conductor I82, back contact 240 of relay 3V1, 10'
front contact 24! of relay 2V1, conductor 242 and
lower winding of relay ISMR to (~-). Current
through this winding of switch machine control
relay ISMR positions its polar contact to the left
for causing the switch machine to actuate the
associated track switch to its reverse position.
The second normally short “off” period is ter
minated and relay FP1 is picked up to reenergize
relay T before its release, so that relay L re
mains down throughout the second “on” period
in response to this normally short preceding “off”
period. A circuit isv closed for actuating the polar
contact of relay 2SMR to its right hand position
which extends from (+), front contact 243 of
relay FPI, conductor I83, back contact 244 of 25
relay L, back contact 245 of relay 3V1, front con
tact 246 of relayZVI, conductor 24‘! and lower
winding of relay 2SMR to (—) . In the event that
lever 2SML is in its reverse position, then relay LG
will be picked up to render the second “off” period 30
abnormally long, so ‘that relay L will remain
picked up throughout the succeeding “on” period
(in a manner described in connection with the
?rst “on” period) , to complete a circuit for actuat
ing the polar contact of relay ZSMR to its left
hand dotted position, which circuit extends from
(+), front contact 243 of relay FP1, conductor
I83, front contact 244 of relay L, back contact 248
of relay 3V1, front contact 249 of relay 2V1, con
ductor 250 and upper winding of relay 2SMR to
(-~). The polar contact of relay 28MB. in its
right hand position causes switch machine ZSM
to position track switch ETS to its normal posi
lected station only. Upon the picking up of relay
2V1 at the selected station in response to the
tion and with this contact in its left hand dotted
second “off” period, a stick circuit is provided
switch 2T5 to its reverse position.
for relay SO which is maintained complete
throughout the remainder of the cycle. This is
conveniently referred to as the permanent stick
50 circuit and extends from (+), front contact
203 of relay SE1, conductor I95, front contact 236
of relay 2V1, front contact 2I5 and lower winding
of relay S0 to (—). Relay SOS is dropped out
during the second “off” period when relay FP1
55 is released, because of its open front contact
2|‘! and because there is no circuit including the
upper windings of the SO and SOS relays ener
gized after relay 2V1 is picked up. Relay SOS
therefore remains deenergized throughout the
remainder of the cycle.
Transmission of controls.—It will be recalled
that the second “off” period was normally short
because lever 2SML in its normal position was
not effective to pick up relay LG during this “off”
65 period and also that the second “on” period was
(+) because lever ISML in its normal position
effected the picking up of relay PC. II'ne (-I-)
impulse is received at the illustrated station by
line relay F1 positioning its polar contacts to the
right. This closes a circuit for energizing switch
machine control relay ISMR which extends from
(+), front contact 269 of relay SO, conductor I8 I,
contact 204 of relay F1 in its right hand dotted
position, conductor I92, back contact 23'! of relay
3V1. front contact 238 of relay 2V1, conductor 239
position switch machine 28M positions track
'
45
In a similar manner additional steps may be
used for transmitting additional controls to the
illustrated ?eld station for governing signals, but
since the above typical examples illustrate the 50
manner of such transmission it is believed unnec—
essary to illustrate the signal control relays which
may obviously be controlled by the following polar
impulses and time space lengths. Although the
four code control circuits used for selecting the 55
station in the manner previously described are
shown connected through contacts of the 3V1
and 2V1 relays, it will be understood that where
station selection is effected on the ?rst step of
the cycle these circuits need not connect through 60
contacts of relay 3V1, it only being necessary that
they be broken by back contacts of relay 2V1.
The contacts associated with these circuits on the
2V1 and 3V1 relays are shown only for the pur
pose of indicating that they may be used for sta 65
tion selection in a system where such selection
requires more than one step of the cycle and in
this event of course the control circuits for con
trolling the switch control relays, and the like
just described, will be transferred to additional 70
stepping relays of the bank.
Following the application of the last impulse
the line circuit is deenergized for a comparatively
long interval of time referred to as the “clearing
out” period. During this “clearing out” period 75
11
2,114,001
relays FP1 and 8A1 respectively. Relay T is
dropped out during this “clearing out” period ‘be
cause of open front contact 2l9 of relay FP1. The
closure of back contact 228 of relay T will eifect
front contact 25'! of relay PT1, front contact 258
and winding of relay P31 to (—).
The picking up of relay PB1 opens the normally
energized line circuit at open back contact '22l,
which effects the dropping of relay F1. Relay
PT1 is deenergized because of open contact 222
and relay PT1 drops after a comparatively long
the picking up of relay L because of closed front
interval of time due to its slow-acting character
contact-2H3 of relay SE1, but relay L will be re
leased when relay 8B1 releases and opens front
contact 2I8. This operation of relay L is of no
istics.
relay FP1 remains down sufficiently long to effect
the dropping of relays SA1 and SE1 in sequence,
because of open front contacts 226 and 221 of
‘
The opening of the line circuit also effects the 10
dropping of relay F in the control of?ce, which
closes a circuit for picking up relay CF extending
consequence.
The stepping relays at the ?eld station are from (+), back contact 94 of relay 5E, conduc
dropped out in the same manner as explained ' tor 15!, back contact 95 of relay F, back contacts
64 and’!!! of relays SD and C respectively and 15
in
connection with those at the control office,
15
except that their stick circuits are controlled by lower winding of relay CF to (—). Relay CF
relay SB1. Relay S0 is deenergized during the closes a stick circuit for itself extending from
“clearing out” period when its permanent stick (+), front contact 45 of relay SC, front contact
circuit is deenergized at open front contact 203 96 and upper winding of relay CF to (—), and
since relay SB picks up and closes its front con 20
20 ‘of relay SE1. When the line circuit is reener
tact 93 before relay SC drops and opens its front
gized at the end of the “clearing out” period, re
lay F1 again positions its polar contacts to the contact 45, this stick circuit is maintained
left and the system is thereby placed in its normal throughout the cycle but is deenergized during
condition.
25
-
During the operation of the control cycle above
described, relay PT1 is dropped out during the
conditioning “on” period because of open back
contact 223 of relay SE1, but the release of
relay PTl serves no purpose during a control
30 cycle. Its function will be explained in connec
tion with an indication cycle. Following the
“clearing out” period, when the line circuit is re
energized, relay PT1 is picked up over the circuit
including contact 222 of relay F1 in its left hand
35 position. The system is now in its normal condi
tion from which it may be again initiated.
Transmission of indicati0rns.-—Although this
system is of the coded duplex type and indications
may be transmitted from any station to the con
40 trol of?ce during the same cycle that controls are
transmitted to the same or some other station.
it is convenient to ?rst explain the communica
tion of indications alone on a separate operating
cycle, before considering the duplex feature of
45 the system.
The manner in which ?eld stations are al
lowed to transmit only one at a time in a pre
determined order will be explained in connection
with the look-out feature, this feature being in
cluded in the description following the descrip
50
tion of the operation of the system with respect
CF in the same manner that relay C was dropped 25
as explained in. connection with a control cycle.
Relay 0C is now picked up over a circuit ex
tending from (+), back contact 36 of relay SD, ‘
back contact 3'! of relay C, front contact 38 of
relay CF and winding of relay CC to (—) .
Re
30,
lay OC‘ remains up throughout this cycle and is
dropped during the “clearing out” period in the‘
same manner described in connection with a con
trol cycle. The opening of back contact‘ 38 of
relay CF deenergizes relay NC and relay PC is
35'
picked up over a circuit extending from (+),
front contact 48 of relay 00, back contact 49
of relay C, front contact 91 of relay CF, back
contact 98 of relay IV, PC bus 54 and winding
of relay PC to (—). The dropping of relay NC 40
and the picking up of relay PC energizes the line
circuit with (+) energy, which is effective to
pick up relays F and F? in the control office in
a manner already described in connection with a
45
control cycle.
The E relays and the slow-acting relays in the
control office are now operated during the con
ditioning “on” period in the same manner as de
scribed in connection with a control cycle, fol
lowing which the line is impulscd and the step
ping relays at the office and at the transmitting
to the transmission of indications from a single
?eld station are operated in s'ynchronism. Dur
?eld station, assuming that such ?eld station is
ing this cycle all of the impulses will be (—)
(following the conditioning (+) impulse), be
cause NC bus 40 will be permanently energized 55
the only one having new indications to transmit
55 at the beginning of the cycle.
Automatic start-A change in the condition of
the detector track section or a change in con
dition of other tra?ic controlling devices at the
illustrated station may occur for effecting the
initiation of the system for the transmission of
indications. Although the detailed circuits are
not shown, it will be assumed (and readily un
derstood) that any such change may so condi
tion these circuits that relay CH is dropped. The
65 dropping of relay CH. closes a circuit for picking
up relay PBl which extends from (+), back con
tact 203 of relay SE1, contact 204 of relay F1
in its left hand position, conductor I82, back
contact 21%| of relay L, back contacts 25!, 252
and 235 of relays 3V1, 2V1 and IV1 respectively,
70
the “clearing. out” period for dropping out relay
back contact 253 of relay CH, conductor I84, back
contacts 254 and 255 of relays L01 and FF1 re-,
spectively, front contact 256 of relay PT1 and
winding, of relay PB1 to (—). Relay PB1 closes
7.5' a stick circuit for itself which extends from (+) ,
when relay lV picks up and closes its front con
tact 9B. The time spaces between impulses will
be normally short because no CD relay is picked
up to complete an energizing circuit for relay LG.
This series of (—) impulses and normally short 60
time spaces comprises the phantom control code
previously mentioned which is ineffective to se
lect any station for controls.
Referring again to the ?eld station, the (+)
energization of the line circuit during the con 65
ditioning “on” period causes relay F1 to position
its polar contacts to the right. Relays SO and
SOS are picked up but are dropped out in re-‘
sponse to the phantom control code.
A circuit
is now closed for picking up relay L01 which ex
tends from (+), back contact 203 of relay‘ 5B1,
contact 204 of relay F1 in its right hand dotted
position, conductor E92, back contact 205 of relay
L, back contacts 236, 201, and 259 of relays 3V1,
2V1 and W1 respectively, conductor I85, front
70
12
2,114,001
contact 26!} of relay PB1 and winding of relay
L01 to (—). Relays FP1 and SA1 are picked up
in the manner previously described, but relay
8B1 is not energized at this time due to open
back contact 26! of relay PEI. The picking up
of relay L01 energizes the stick circuit of relay
PBl over a circuit extending through back con
tact 262 of relay SA1 and front contact 263 of
relay L01, which circuit is deenergized when
:relay SA1 picks up because relay PT1 will be
down at this time, therefore relay PB1 is deener
gized and after a comparatively long interval of
time it is released.
The picking up of relay SAl closes a stick cir
15 cuit for relay L01 extending from (+), front
contact 284 of relay SA1, front contact 265 and
winding of relay L01 to (—), which stick circuit
is maintained energized for holding relay L01
picked up until the “clearing out” period at the
end of the cycle, when relay L01 is released by
relay 8A1 opening front contact 264. When re~
lay PB1 drops and closes its back contact 26| the
energizing circuit for relay SE1 is completed and
this relay picks up and remains up until the
25' “clearing out” period at the end of the cycle.
Relay PT1 remains down throughout the cycle
and is again energized during the “clearing out”
period. Relays T, L, FP1 and the stepping relays
are operated as in. a control cycle, but the step
30 ping relay bank at the transmitting station only
is operated, because front contact 265 of relay
SO and front contact 261 of relay L01 will both
be open at other stations, so that the stepping
relay circuit extending from (-|-) at a, front con
35 tact similar to contact 268 of relay SB1 and back
contacts similar to contact 269 of relay FP'1 will
be ineffective at stations not selected for con
trols or for the transmission of indications dur
ing the cycle.
The stepping relay bank at the transmitting
40
station is operated however because of closed
front contact 261 of relay L01 and it will be
understood that, in the event of a duplex cycle
where some other station is selected for con
trols, its SOv relay will be picked up so that a
contact similar to 266 will be closed for permitting
operation of the'stepping relay bank at that sta
tion.
‘
Registration of a ?eld station.-—At the particu
50 lar station having indications to transmit, lock
out relay L01 is up and, because of its open
back contact 293, the transmitting contacts 215
and 285 of the FZ1 and BZ1 relays are rendered
effective. Similarly, by the closure of its front
contacts 210‘ and 2"“ of relay LO1 the control
circuits for the transmitting relays PFI, FZ1 and
BZ1 are rendered effective.
It will be understood that relay 8A2 at the end
station (see Fig. 2B) is picked up during the con
ditioning “on” period so that the converter is
started by the closure of front contact 322. This
effects the application of alternating current to
the line circuit by way of transformer TF2 and
this current ?nds a low impedance path from the
65 right hand terminal of the secondary winding of
transformer TF2, by way of back contact 323
of relay L02 to line conductor R1. From the left
hand terminal of this transformer winding a low
impedance path is provided by way of back con
tacts 320 and 32l of relays PF? and PB2 respec
tively and the band pass ?lter, including induct
ances BIN2 and 2IN2 and condensers 1C2 and 2C2,
to conductor L1. This alternating current ?nds
a low impedance path through any other stations
75. which may be located between the end station
and the transmitting station, similar to that just
pointed out at the end station, so that a substan
tial alternating current potential appears on
conductorsR.1 and L1 of Fig. 2.
It will be assumed that the transmitting sta
tion identi?es itself in the control office by a code
comprising “no alternating current” during the
conditioning “on” period, “no alternating” cur
rent during the ?rst “off” period, “alternating
current” during the ?rst “on” period and a short 10
?rst “on” period. This code combination posi
tions the polar contacts of relays IPT to 4PT in~
clusive of Fig. 10 to the positions- illustrated.
These contacts in their illustrated positions may
effect the picking up of a station relay to identify 15
the transmitting ?eld station, but in the drawings’
this stationrelay is not shown. However, a suc
ceeding code circuit is illustrated as being con
nected through the polar contacts of these pilot
relays in their illustrated positions to indication 20
receiving relay IIR, since this provides means for
illustrating how an indication is transmitted and
selectively received in the control oflice in accord
ance with the positions assumed by the pilot're
lays. The station identifying code is provided at 25'
the transmitting ?eld station by jumpers 2l0 to
2E3 inclusive illustrated in Fig. 2A. It will now
be explained how the code combination is pro
vided by the particular jumper arrangement illus
trated, and it will also be pointed out how. 30
alternate positions of each of these code jumpers
select the alternate code for providing a choice
of two code combinations for each jumper shown.
It will be understood that, in systems of larger
size, additional code jumpers will be provided
and selected at additional steps of the cycle.
Code jumper 2H connected as illustrated in
Fig. 2A determines that no alternating current
shall be permitted to ?ow over the line circuit
to the control ‘office during the conditioning “on” 40
period. This is brought about by picking up relay
FZ1 during the conditioning “on” period over a
circuit extending from (+), jumper 2“; back
contact 212 of relay IV1, conductor I86, winding
of relay FZl and front contact 2'“ of relay L01 45
to (—). This pick-up circuit for relay FZ1 is
completed as soon as relay L01 is picked up during
the conditioning “on” period and upon the pick
ing up of relay FPl during this same period a
stick circuit is completed for relay FZ1 which 50'
extends from (+), front contact 213 of relay FZ1,
front contact 274 of relay F131, winding of relay
FZ1 and front contact 2'“ of relay L01 to (—).
During the first “off” period, the dropping of
relay FP1 opens the stick circuit for relay F21 55
and the picking up of relay IV1 opens the pick
up circuit of relay F‘Z1 at back contact 212, thus
effecting the release of relay FZ1.
The alternating current connected to conduc
tors L1 and R1 of Fig. 2, as previously explained, 60
is by-passed or shunted at the transmitting ?eld
station during the conditioning “on” period in
accordance with code jumper 2H in its illus
trated position. This shunt circuit extends from
conductor R1, front contact 215 of relay FP1, 65
front contact 216 of relay F21, inductance 3IN3,
condenser 3C1 and resistance 4R1 to conductor L.
It will be understood that this is a series resonant
shunt circuit offering a minimum impedance to
the frequency of the alternating current applied 70
to the line circuit at the end station. Further
more, a parallel resonant circuit is provided by
inductance IIN1 and condenser IC1 which traps
or blocks out any of the alternating current not
shunted by the above described shunt circuit.
75
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