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Патент USA US2114062

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‘April 12, 1938-
P. N. SMITH
'
2,114,062
ELECTRICAL MEANS AND. METHOD OF REMOTE CONTROL
Filed Oct. 5, 1933
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April 12, 1938.
P. N. SMITH
2,114,062
ELECTRICAL MEANS AND METHOD OF REMOTE CONTROL
Filed Oct. 5, 1933
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April 12, 1938.
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P. N. SMITH
2,114,062
ELECTRICAL mums AND mmnon 0F REMOTE CONTROL
Filed Oct. 5, 19s:
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‘April 12, 1938.
2,114,062
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ELECTRICAL MEANS AND METHOD OF REMOTE CONTROL
Filed Oct‘. 5, 1933
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April 12, 1938.
P. N. SMITH
2,114,062
ELECTRICAL MEANS AND METHOD OF ‘REMOTE CONTROL
Filed Oct. 5, 1933
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' Patented Apr. 12, 1938:v
uN-irEo STATES eA'rENT OFFICE
ELECTRICAL MEANS am! run-mop or
REMOTE cou'rmr.
Philip Norman Smith, Meir-ole, Macs.
Application October 5, 1933, Serial No. 892,8.“
28 Claims.
(Cl. 178-27)
This invention relates to a method and means
' for'the remote control of ‘electrical circuits and
more‘ particularlyto those cases where it is de
sired to control a largenumber of circuits at a
5 distance in the simplest possible manner.
It is the object of the present invention to pro
vide such a method and means and, also to provide
a new method andv means for the transmission
over short or long distances and by wire or radio
10 means of typewritten characters or the like.
In‘ the accompanying drawings
.
1
Figure 1 is an elementary schematic diagram to
illustrate the functioning of one part of my in
vention:
-
'
'
Figure 2 is a modi?cation of the schematicwir
15
ing diagram shown in Figure 1;
Figure 3 shows a wiring diagram of a remote
control circuit for direct current operation;
Figure 4 shows av detail drawing of the short
20
circuiting contact;
,
Figure 5 shows still another modi?cation of my
invention;
Figures 6 and 7 show other modi?cations of the
system;
25
'
Figure 8 shows a detail of the selector harde
pressor;
-
Figure 9 shows a diagram of the essential fea
tures of a modi?cation of my invention for trans
30
.
mitting teletype messages using direct current;
,QFigure 10 shows a detail of the keybar selector
switch};
‘
VFi'gure llfshows the same system as Figure 9
but modi?ed to use alternating currents 'for radio
and long wire circuits which will hereinafter be.
3;, described in detail.
More particularly this invention utilizes the
ability of two electrically controlled and pivotally
connected pantograph arms of assuming at their
common point, a relation with respect to some _
40 other ?xed point which is determined by the cur
rents supplied to them, to select for energization
' one or more of a number of electrical circuits at
the will of the operator, from the point from
which the controlling currents are sent.
The increasing use of methods for controlling
43
industrial operations from a distance without the
necessity of an operator being actually present at
the point at which the operations are taking place,
is su?icient proof that there is a de?nite place in
50 industry for a simple apparatus which will make
possible the control of a number of operations
from a distance. Obviously the number of such
operations which can be controlled from a dis
tance with little or no increase in the complexity
55 of the equipment will be a measure of its utility.
,
The distant control of electrical generating.
plants and substations, the remote control of
radio transmitters, radio ship beacons and avia
tionsbeacons,the teletypeby means of which type
written characters can betransmitted to and re-
5 _
produced at a distant point. are a few examples
of the diverse ?elds in which remote control
‘equipment ?nds a place.
Some of the methods known to the art for the i
_
remote control of the above services involve the 10
transmission, by wire or radio means and if the'
number of conductors or circuits between the two
points is to be kept to a minimum, of a series
of impulses of various lengths or groupings which '
impulses or groups are transformed through some 15
selecting means into the action which it is desired
to produce. Thus in the so-called "?ve unit’? tele- ’
type system the various characters required in
transmitting typewritten messages are obtained
‘
by various combinations of impulses in the “?ve 20
unit" group.
'
Meter readings and so forth from power sta
tions are transmitted to a control point by various
methods some of vwhich involve the use ‘of im
pulses, some the use of different frequencies and 25
so on. All of these methods become cumbersome
however when any great number of operations
are to be controlled. There is therefore a distinct
demand for a control equipment ?exible enough
to cover a large number of operations with no
added complexity in itself on that account and '
which does not depend on accurate timing, a large
number of control frequencies, impulses or cir
cuits for its positive and accurate action.
This invention meets these requirements in a
simple and effective fashion as the following, ex
planation of its operation will show.
‘
In order to understand the principle of this in- '
vention reference should be made to the diagram
shown in Figure 1. In this diagram I is a source 40
of electrical power and maintains a constant volt
age across the rheostats 2 and 3. 4 and 5 are
short electrically conducting arms‘ of two bell
cranks the longer arms of which (6 and 1) are
pivotally connected to the rigid arms 8 and 9 45
which arms are also pivotally joined at their
other ends at a common point In.
It will be clear from the above that as the com-.
mon point‘ In is moved to various points on the
tablet ii, the voltages between ground and' the 50
conducting arms 4 and 5 of the bell cranks which
make contact with the rheostats 2 and 3. will vary
depending upon the position of the junction point
Ill on the tablet ll.
‘
,
Suppose now that at some other point which 55
2
2,114,062
will be designated as the receiving station, a simi
lar pair of bell cranks are provided and which
also have pivotally interconnected rigid arms. '
Suppose also that the shorter arms of this
second pair of bell cranks are pivotally connected
to movable coils I4 and I6 disposed in the mag-'
netic ?elds provided by the magnets I6 and I7,
instead of to the rheostats as was the case at the
transmitting station.
10
'
Suppose further that the varying voltages be
tween the bell crank conducting arms and ground
at the transmitting station are carried by wires
I2 and I3 to one end respectively of coils I4 and
I6 while the other ends of these coils are con
15 nected to ground.
ensure that point 22 will assume position B for
instance on tablet 23.
It will be understood that although only six
positions of point 22 are shown the same method
can readily be extended-to include as manyposi
6
,
tions as may be desired by providing the addi
tional necessary resistors and switches.
Figures 3 and 4 indicate how the above de
scribed methods tor moving point 22 to any de
sired position can be utilized in a practical circuit
selector. Tablet 23 in Figure 3 can conveniently
take the form of a horizontally disposed panel
of some insulating material such as Bakelite. At
points A, B, C, D, E, and F are provided pairs
of electrically conducting segments which are
'
The varying voltages set up between wire I2
and ground and between wire I3 and ground will
cause correspondingly varying currents to flow
through coils I4 and I6 respectively and, since
these coils are supported in the permanent mag
netic ?elds provided by the magnets I6 and I ‘I
they will assume a position which will depend
upon the magnitudes of the currents traversing
them. The movements of these coils I4 and I5
25 will as a consequence cause movements in arms
I8, I9, 20, and 2I with the ?nal result that the
common point 22 of rigid arms 20 and 2| will
execute with respect to tablet 23 the same move
ments that common point III in the transmitter
30 executes with respect to its tablet II. Thus if
the operator at the transmitting station wishes to
have the juncture point 22 assume some position
as A on the tablet 23 it will only be necessary for
him to move the common point I0 at the trans
35 mitter to the corresponding position A’ on the
transmitter tablet II and the desired position A
will be automatically achieved.
. '
_
Similarly it he wishes to have point 22 assume
other position such as B or C it can be automati
40 cally accomplished by- moving point I 0 to the
corresponding positions B’ and C' on tablet II.
It will be clear from the above that point 22
can be made to assume any desired position on the
tablet 23 by moving point III to the corresponding
45 position on tablet II. It will also ‘be clear that
the actual mechanical movement 01.’ point I0 and
the simultaneous movement of arms 4 and 5 on
the rheostats 2 and 3 on this account in order to
bring about changes in the position oi! point 22
supported by the panel 23.
'
Furthermore an insulated piece 46 shown in
detail in Figure 4 is provided and is disposed at
the juncture point of arms 20 and 2i. The
individual segments 46 and 5| in Figure 4 are
insulated from each other by an insulating seg
ment 43 and are so spaced from one another that
when the conducting piece 41 at the junction of
arms 20 and 2| takes a position such as is shown
in Figure 4 and is brought down on any pair of
segments, an electrical circuit is established be
tween them which is again interrupted when the
conducting piece 41 is raised.
The ‘insulating panel 23 carrying the pairs of
segments oi.’ which one pair is provided for each 30
circuit to be controlled, and the two arms 26 and
2I are bridged by a yoke 43 which yoke in turn
is connected mechanically to a coil 52 movably
supported in the magnetic ?eld provided by mag
‘net 53 as shown in Figure 3. When a current of
the proper strength traverses coil 52 and in the
proper direction the yoke 43 is drawn down and
forces the insulated piece 46 carrying conducting
member 41 down against the panel 23 at what
ever point piece 46 happens to be at the time when 40
coil 52 is energized.
In order to e?ect this action of yoke 43 the
switches 36, 31, 36, 39, 40 and 4i. in Figure 3 in
addition to having contacts connected to re
sistances 24, 25, 26, 21, 26, 29, 30, 3I, 32, 33, 34
45
and 35 are also each provided with a set of con
tacts connected in series with coil 62, battery I
and ground so that whenever any one of the
mitted to coils I4 and I5.
In other words it is possible to have point 22
switches 36, 31, 38, 33, 4l'or 4I are closed the
extra pair of contacts in series with coil 52 is 50
also closed but only subsequent to the closure of
the two pairs of contacts connected to the resis
tors controlled by that switch. By arranging the
assume any one of a number of positions on_
55 tablet 23 without the necessity of using a similar
respective closures in this way, time is allowed
for the interconnected pantograph arms to come 55
50 are unnecessary, providing that voltages corre
sponding to the desired position of 22 are trans
pantograph system at the transmitter, by pro
viding means for obtaining and transmitting to
coils I4 and I5 the voltages needed to make point
60
22 assume the desired position.
Figure 2 illustrates a method of doing this.
Resistors 24, 26, 28, 30, 32 and 34 are connected
in series across a source of voltage I and similarly
resistors 25, 21, 29, 3|, 33 and 35 are_ also con
nected in series across the source of voltage I.
65 The values of the resistors are so chosen that
when the contacts of switch 36 are closed the
voltages applied between ground and wire I2 and
between ground and wire I3 are such as to cause
currents to ?ow in coils I4 and I5 which will
70 assure that point 22 will assume position A for
instance on tablet 23.
~
_
Similarly when switch 31 is closed the voltages
applied between ground and wire I2 and between
ground and wire I3 may be made such as to cause
75 currents to flow through coils I4 and I5 which will
to rest before piece 41 is depressed to close the
circuit between the segments of a.‘ pair.‘
The closure of the circuit between segments of
a pair provided by the depression 01 member 46
can then be used to energize a relay whose con 60
tacts are connected in the circuit which it is de
sired to control. This energization of the circuit
in question will continue as long as coil 52 is
energized which in practice would mean as long
as one of the switches at the transmitter is de 65
pressed. As soon as the switch key at the trans
mitter is released the various circuits at the re
ceiving station will be deenergized and member
46 will be returned to its initial position of rest
at the left by spring 32.
70
IF‘will be noted from a study of the foregoing
that the position of member 46 is dependent upon
the values of the currents in the two coils I4 and
I5. It will also be evident that if the currents to
the two coils I4 and I6 should for some reason 75
3
2,114,0cs
or other suiler a reduction in transmission due to
line losses or other causes so that the currents
which actually traverse these coils‘is less than
was intended the position of‘ member 46 as a re
sult‘ of the ?ow of these-currents in the actuating
> coils might not be the one desired which might
mean that some other circuit than the one in
tended would actually be energized at the-receiv
. ing station.
To guard against this possibility a test circuit
has been provided which is as follows.
One set of switch contacts is provided at the
transmitter which when closed under normal '
‘ conditions will ensure that member-'46 at the re
15 celving station will take some position‘ such as A
on panel 23. The two segments of'the pair at A
may be connected through wires ‘l2, ‘l3, battery
'II and ground to an annunciator or other suit-0
t 10
net coil I02 so that arm I 00 will assume some de- -
sired position at the receiving station, and the
other pair of blades being used, after arm I00
has taken up the desired position, to depress arm
I00 thereby completing the desired circuit.
With reference to the switches used at the
transmitter it will be understood that although
the foregoing has more particularlyreferred to
the use of switches which will delay the actuation
of coil I06 until after arm I00 has reached the 10'
desired position, the use of such switches as are .
illustrated is merelyvfor convenience and that
the same result can .be obtained by the use of
time delay relays connected as shown in Figure 7
mitter just referred to above are closed member
to ensure that circuit energization at the re 15
ceiver will not take place until the individual seg-. ,
ments of a pair have been short circuited for the
proper length of time.
Under such circumstances as have just been '
outlined the use of an arm-depressing circuit be
tween the transmitter and receivercan be dis
46 should move to position A at the receivingsta
tion and short circuit the ‘segments of the pair
at that point which in turn will ‘energize the coil
25 in the annunciator and show the operator at the
transmitter. that the system is operating satis
and its associated supportingpiece together with
- factorily.‘ If the operator at the transmitter does
of the pair of contacts at the receiving station
circuit selector with which they are connected
in series will have been short circuited for the
proper length of time by the short circuiting
I able signaling device at the transmitting station.
When‘ the set of switch contacts at the trans
20
‘so
‘as
not ‘receive the expected return signal he can
then take the necessary steps to locate the cause
of the diihculty and correct it.
In all the foregoing description reference has.
continually been made to the use of pantograph
pensed with as may also’ member I08 in Figure 5 '
magnet I05 shown in Figure 8. Figure '7 illus
trates the circuit sorevised where I25 and I26 25
are time delay relays which will not close their.
respective circuits until the individual segments
sov
arms at the receiving station and to the use of
piece carried on the end of arm I00.
It will be understood that in this particular
various resistances at the transmitter to control
pair of eontactson the insulating panel I0‘I_ (Fig 35
the actuating‘ current to these arms and conse
arrangement the conducting segments of each’
ure 5) maybe made ?ush with the surface of the
quently the movements of the arms themselves.
so that the short circuiting member at the
Although the use of two pantograph arms ‘for ‘ panel
end of arm I00'may be in contact with the surface
controlling the position of member 46 is highly of
the panel at all times and need not be slightly ,
‘advantageous in a number of cases, It will some
removed from it as would be the case where av 40
times happen that a system such as is illustrated
in Figure 5 will be suilicient.
In the system illustrated schematically in Figs
ure 5 the pairs of segments which may be short
circuited by the conducting piece carried by
45 member 46 are disposed around the arc of a circle,
whose center is also'the axis IOI about which
arm I00 is'pivotedand free to move under the
in?uence of the force exerted by coil I02 which
is ‘movably supported in the field of magnet I03.
50 The arm I00 which supports member 46 is re
turned to its position of rest at the extreme left
by the action of a coil spring or, as in the case
shown in Figure .5, may be returned to its posi
tion- of restby a combination of a spring and an .
electromagnet or even by electromagnetic means
ventionis of great utility and susceptible to ap- ‘
plication in a number of different ?elds‘ which
will readily occur to those skilled in the art. 45
For instance the same type of mechanism. at the
receiving station maybe used for controlling
purely mechanical operations such as closing or
opening valves and the like without departing
from the spirit of my invention.v In the cases 50
where purely mechanical operations are to be
controlled the depression of the arm may be
used to effect the operation directly without th
intervention of an electrical circuit.
'
.
. One of the purposes of this invention is to pro
alone. Rigid member I06 pivoted-about axis I04
vide a more convenient and simple means for the
has one end which may be made arcuate in form
so as to ensure that in any‘ position’ of arm I00
messages wherein typewritten messages can be
it may be pulled up by the action of magnet I06
on'armature I06 and thereby depress rigid arm
I00 so that conducting member. 41 on its outer
end may short circuit the desired pair of seg
ments.
‘
.
_
Reference to Figure 6 will illustrate‘ the elec
65 trical connections of the system where for sim
'
depressor mechanism is employed.
It will be clear from the foregoing that my in
plicity sake two points only on the selector have
been shown- although it will be understood that
. the number ‘ of circuits which can .1 be ' controlled
in this way is by no means-so limited. Switches
70 HI and I22 which are individually capable of
selecting one circuit each at the receiver for ener
gization are each provided with two pairs of
blades; one being the“ pairv used tointroduce the
proper resistance into the circuit “completed ‘by
75 source'of power I20, wires I20 and I24 andr'nag
65
transmission and reception of so called "teletype”
transmitted to and reproduced at a distant point.
Most of the systems now known and in use for
this purpose involve the transmission of .various
impulses or groups of impulses which impulses
are ‘used upon their arrival at the receiving sta
tion and after passing through a selector mechanism to actuate the keybar carrying the letter orv 65
character which it is desired to reproduce.
The best known ‘of these ‘ systems is the so
called “?ve uni " teletype where the transmis
sion of any desired letter is effected by transmit
ting various combinations of impulses and spaces 70
in the “?ve unit” group. . This system while com
parativeiy effective is open to a number of obj cc"
tions among which are that .it requires synchroni- ‘
zation between the sender and receiverwhichis
frequently di?icult to'obtain and furthermore 76
4
.
9,114,082
that it requires very complicated and expensive
apparatus at both the sending and receiving
stations.
of course that the movable arm and its associ
,
My invention involves no such difficulties and
in fact it can be attached to a standard type
writer without any but minor alterations to the
typewriter itself. To learn how this may be done
in a simple manner reference should be made to
Figure 9 where l is a source of power. one side
10 of which is grounded and the other side of which
is connected through wire 220 to switch blades
200, 201,2l0, 2H, 2“ and 210. When switch
contacts 200 and 200, 200 and 2", or 213 and.2l4
are closed a current whose magnitude depends
15 on which switch is closed, ?ows through wires
220 and 22| and thence through coil 2" which
is movably supported in the magnetic ?eld pro
vided by magnet 2l0..- This current ?ow causes
coil 210 to move and thereby moves arm-224 to
some position over a pair of segments.
which makes it possible to use the same type
writer for transmitting and receiving assuming
Closure
of contacts 201 and 200, 2“ and 2l2, or 2l0 and
2" energizes coil 2“ and as previously explained
depresses arm 224 causing the conducting mem
ber at its end to short circuit the segments over
25 which it happens to lie. In the actual equip
ment two pairs of switch contacts together with
an armature are pivotally attached to each key
of the typewriter as illustrated in Figure 10
which shows a detail sketch of the keybar and
30 switch contacts 200 and 200, and 201 and 200.
When the key is depressed contacts 200 and 200
close ?rst which causes arm 224 to assume some
given position determined by the voltage of the
source i and the resistance 202. Further pres
sure on the key results in the closure of contacts
201 and 200 which energizes coil 2" and de
presses am 224 and for example if the current
in coil 2" is such as .to make bar 224 take a posi
tion over pair of segments 220, then energizes
40 relay 226. The current caused thereby to ?ow
through coil 221 creates a pull on armature 230
which, acting through rigid member 220 and the
short arm of the bell crank typebar 220 pivoted
at 232, depresses the typebar and prints the
45 desiredletter at the receiving station.
Similar pairs of switch blades are provided for
each operation or character which it is desired to
transmit. Upper or lower case characters may
be transmitted as with the ordinary teletype
50 writer.
ated mechanism and circuits are also provided
at the transmitter. When it is desired to make
the same machine ‘available for either sending
or receiving the coil surrounding the armature on
the end of the contact bar in Figure 10 will be
connected into the circuit in the position taken
by coil 221 in Figure 9. Each of the coils on the 10
remaining keybars will ~be similarly connected
through a relay to a pair of segments on the
receiving panel.
'
It will be immediately apparent that the only
remaining equipment required will be a triple-pole 15
double throw switch to throw the equipment from
a sending condition to a receiving condition or
vice versa with respect to the line wires HI, and
222. A test circuit such as has been described
before is also provided consisting of the series 20
circuit made up of annunciator 24l,'wire 223, '
source of power 240, contacts 242 and ground.
_‘ Direct current circuits such as have been de
scribed exclusively in the foregoing are entirely
satisfactory for short distance transmission. For 25'
longer distances over wire or radio circuits the
use of alternating current becomes imperative.
My invention is not con?ned to use on direct
current circuits but may with ease be applied to
long distance wire or radio circuits equally well. 30
Figure 11 shows a wiring diagram in suillcient
detail to explain‘ the system, of a typical arrange
ment of my invention for use in transmitting tele
type messages over long distance wire or radio
circuits. It will be noted that the general ar 85
rangement of circuits in the alternating current
case is similar in many respects to the direct
current cases heretofore discussed except that
certain changes which, in order to overcome exi
gencies inherent in radio circuits, I have found it 40
desirable to incorporate.
‘
Referring to Figure 11 it will be noted that
when the double pole switch 001 which is similar
in all respects to the key switches shown in Fig
ure 9, is depressed the ?rst action is to allow 1000 45
cycle current in an amount which is determined.
by resistor 304 and the voltageof the source, to
?ow through one of the primary windings of the
transformer 300. From thence it may be trans
mitted by any of theusual wire or radio means 60
' The operation of the carriage shift mechanism
to the receiver. At that point it is ?ltered out
is effected in a somewhat different way. The byva simple tuned circuit, ampli?ed, recti?ed and
operator at the transmitter upon reaching the allowed to ?ow through the windings of coil "0
end of a line will of necessity operate the carriage thereby causing arm 224 to assume some particu
55 return in preparation for the next line. In order
lar desired position with respect to the row of
to accomplish the same result at the receiving pairs of segments over which it passes.
station an extra key is provided at the transmit _ pressure on switch 301 causes the other Further
pair of
.ter with two sets of contact blades similar to the contacts to close which applies a 666 cycle voltage
other keys. When this key is depressed the
60 short circuiting member carried on the end of
arm 224 short circuits the segments 233 there
by energizing relay 234 and applying power to
motor 235 from power supply 230. This motor
through the medium of a pinion on its shaft
65 moves rack 230 over and consequently the car
riage of the receiving typewriter to its extreme
right hand position. A limit switch 231 is pro
vided in series with which is the motor 235 so
that the motor will be cut off as soon as it has
70 accomplished the return of the carriage even
though the carriage return key at the transmit
ter may still be depressed.
It will be noted in Figure 10 that a solenoid
coil has been provided around the armature on
75 the end of the switch contact bar. It is this coil
to the primary of transformer 300 which voltage
is similarly transmitted to the receiver where it is 60
filtered out, recti?ed, and applied to coil 2“,
which results in arm 224 being depressed and the
desired circuit at the .receiver energized. Arm
224 it will be noted is returned to its position of
' rest by means of a spring which is secured at 65
one end to arm 224 and at the other end to a coil
movably supported in a uniform magnetic ?eld.
This cell and the magnetic ?eld in which it is
supported are preferably similar to coil 3l0 and
the magnetic ?eld in which it is supported.
70
A reference to Figure 11 will show that a third
source of alternating current is provided having
a frequency of 444 cycles the application of which
to the primary of transformer 300 is controlled
by switch; 300.
76
5
- 2,114,002
A ?lter circuit designed to select this frequency
to th exclusion of others is provided at the-re
ceive. together with an ampli?er as shown.
.awheu' switch as is closed a 444 cycle voltage is
applied to the primary of transformer 808 and is
to the receiver where it is ?ltered
transmit
out, ampli?ed, recti?ed and allowed to ?ow
through coil ii‘. In so doing of course it applies
a pull to’ the arm 224 through spring 320 which
together with the tension of the spring, tends to
return the arm I“ to its position of rest. Under
ordinary circumstances the tension on the arm
produced by this combination will then bezmade
up of two parts; one part being the constant pull
15 or the coil due to the current traversing its wind
ings and the other being the variable tension sup
plied by the spring which will be a function of
the displacement of arm "4 from its position of
rest.‘
.
.
In ordinary practice the 444 cycle frequency
will be transmitted continuously as long as trans
missions are to be e?ected. The number of 666
cycle emissions and the number and intensity of
the 1000 cycle emissions will of course depend
upon which ‘keys are depressed and how fre-v
quently.
I
The advantage of having one end of the arm
return spring attached to the cell which derives
its pull from a recti?ed alternating current re
ceived through the same channel as the 1000 cycle
current used to control the position of the arm is
. immediately obvious.
Suppose for instance that the transmission
from the sending to the receiving station is ef
fected through a radio circuit. Suppose also that
this radio circuit is troubled by static or other
disturbances. Since the 444 cycle current, the
666 cycle current and the 1000 cycle current are
> all transmitted together and ?ltered out at the
,
duce the etlect on said movement of equal changes
in the magnitudes‘of said forces.
2. A method of determining the accuracy with 1
which mechanical movements are produced at a
distance comprising providing a voltage, varying
the intensity of this voltage in accordance with a
desired movement, transmitting this voltage to a
distance, converting it into a mechanical move
ment at the receiving station and, by the comple
tion of said movement, effecting a noti?cation to 10
the station from’ which said voltage was trans
mitted, when said movement coincides with the
movement which it is desired to produce.
3. An apparatus for controlling electrical cir
‘cuits at a, distance comprising means for select
15
ing from a plurality of voltages individually ad
justed in accordance with circuits which itmay
be desired to control, a voltage‘ in accordance with
the circuit which it is desired to control, means
for controlling a second voltage in accordance 20
with the time at which control of the selected
circuit is desired, means for'transmitting these
voltages to a distance, means for converting one
of said transmitted voltages into a current and
converting said current into a rotatory mechani 25
cal movement at the receiving station to effect
the selection of the desired circuit and electrically
separated means cooperating with the other .volt
age to e?ect the control of the selected circuit. ‘
4. A method of controlling electrical circuits at 30
a distance comprising providing a plurality of
voltages individually adjusted in accordance with
the circuits which it may be desired to control,
selecting individually at least one of these volt
ages in accordance with the circuit which it is 35
desired to control, transmitting it to a distance,
converting it into a current and converting said
current, while maintaining/ it constant in direc
tion and magnitude, into a rotatory mechanical
movement in accordance with the circuit desired 40
40. receiver, static disturbances received along with . at the receiving point to effect the selection and
the signal affect the 1000 cycle, 666 cycle and 444
of the desired circuit. '
cycle circuits nearly equally. Such disturbances control
A method of controlling electrical circuits at
will be passed on through the ampli?ers, recti?ed a 5.
distance comprising providing a plurality of
and passed through the two coils BIB and “9 voltages
individually adjusted in accordance with 45
along
with
the
currents
from
.the
signals.
Any
45
the
circuits
it may be desired to control,
forces set up by the passage of these recti?ed selecting onewhich
of these voltages in accordance with
stray currents through coils 3 l8 and 3l9 will bal
ance each other out insofar as movementof arm the circuit which it is desired to control, trans
mitting it to a distance, converting it into a cur
I“ is concerned so that this member is substan
rent
and converting said current, while main 50
tially free from interference, within the capacity taining
it constant in direction and magnitude,
of the ampli?er, due to stray currents.
into a rotatory circuit completing mechanical
As will be seen from Figures 8 and 11 a similar
in accordance with the circuit desired
plan is used to protect the 666 cycle or depressor movement
at the receiving station to effect the selection and
circuit from extraneous electrical disturbances,
56
of the desired circuit.
'
~
recti?ed current from the 444 cycle channel being control method
‘of controlling electrical circuits
passed through the winding of coil "I which coil at 6.a A
distance comprising providing a plurality of
when traversed by recti?ed stray currents, will voltages
individually adjusted in accordance with
provide the necessary force to counterbalance any ,
the
circuits
it may be desired to control‘,
unwanted movements of the depressor arm when individually which
selecting at .least one of these volt 60
coil 2" is also traversed by recti?ed stray cur
ages,,transmitting it to a distance, converting it
rents.
into
a current and converting said current, while
The many advantages of my invention will be
it constant in direction and magni
readily apparent to those skilled in the art. maintaining
tude, into a rotatory mechanical movement at
What I claim and wish to secure by Letters Pat
the receiving point in accordance with the circuit 65
ent is:
desired to effect the selection of the desired cir
1. A method of reducing the e?’ect of extrane
cuit and its control a de?nitely desired time in
ous electrical disturbances on electrically con
trolled mechanical movements consisting of pro
viding at least one voltage, varying this voltage in
70 accordance with the mechanical movement which
it is desired to produce, providing a second volt
age, transmitting these voltages to a distance,
converting them into forces and utilizing the
algebraic sum of said forces, at the receiving
point to eifect the movement desired and to re
terval thereafter as a result of said selection.
'7. A method of controlling electrical circuits
at a distance comprising providing a plurality of 70
voltages individually adjusted in accordance with
the circuits which it may be desired to control,
individually selecting at least one of these volt
ages in accordance with the circuit which it is de
sired to control, providing a second voltage, con 76
I
6
2,114,062 .
- —
troll-ing this voltage in'accordance with the time. , thereafter 0! the local circuit so selected, through
at which control or the selected circuit is de
sired, transmitting these voltages to a distance,
converting them into currents and converting
the ?rst, while maintaining it constant ‘in direc
tion and magnitude, into a rotatory mechanical
movement at the receiving point to e?ect the se
lection oi the desired circuit and converting the
second into an electrically separate electromag
10 netic control of the selected circuit.
-
8. A method of transmitting printable charac
ters to a distance-comprising providing a plu
_ra.lity....ot»v voltages individually adjusted in ac
cordance with the characters which it may be
15 desired to transmit, individually selecting at least
one of these voltages in accordance with the
character which it is desired to transmit, trans
mitting this voltage to a distance, converting it
into a current and converting said current with
20 out change in direction or magnitude into a ro
the medium of said delayed action circuit con
trolling means as a result or said selection.
.
14. In an apparatus for controlling electrical
circuits at a distance, input circuits and means
associated with one of said circuits in?uenced by
current received through it for bringing about a
rotatory mechanical movement for selecting local
circuits in accordance with said current and
means electrically distinct from said first means
cooperating with and in?uenced by current .re-‘
ceived through another input circuit for effecting
control of the selected circuit.
15, An apparatus for reducing the effect 01 ex
traneous electrical disturbances on electrically
controlled mechanical movements, comprising in-'
put circuits, means associated therewith tor exe
cuting mechanical movements in accordance with
‘current received through at least one of said in
tion in accordance with said current to e?ect the
put circuits and means, including a restraining
means, cooperating with current received through
another input circuit for opposing the movements
selection and production of the desired character.
9. An apparatus for controlling electrical cir
duce the e?ect on said movement executing
tatory mechanical movement at the receiving sta
25 cuits at a distance comprising means for select
ing from a plurality of voltages individually ad
Justed in accordance with the circuits which it
may be desired to control, at least one voltage in
accordance with the circuit which it is desired to
30 control, means for transmitting this voltage to a
distance and means for converting it into a cur
rent and converting said current, while main
taining it constant in direction and magnitude,
of said movement executing means so as to re
means, of equal changes in the magnitudes of the
currents received through these two input cir
cuits.
.
16. In an apparatus for producing printable
characters at a distance, typebars, paper feeding
means associated therewith, local circuits con 30
trollingsaid typebars, an input circuit and means
associated therewith in?uenced by current re
ceived through said input circuit for bringing
into a rotatory mechanical movement at the re
about a rotatory mechanical movement for in
ceiving point in accordance with said current to
eiIect the selection and control of the desired cir
dividually selecting said local circuits in-accord
cuit.
‘
10. In an apparatus for controlling electrical
circuits at a distance, output terminals, means
40 for selecting from a plurality of voltages individ
ance with said current and controlling said cir
cuits through the ?ow of said current while it
is being maintained constant in direction and
magnitude.
ually adjusted in accordance with circuits which
17. In an apparatus for e?ecting the remote
control of a typewriter carriage, an input circuit,
it may be desired to control, at least one voltage
in accordance with the circuit which it is desired
to control, means for delivering it to certain 01'
by current received through it for bringing about
said output terminals, and means for delivering
in accordance with the time at which control of
the selected circuit is desired, voltage to other
of said output terminals.
11. In an apparatus for controlling electrical
circuits at a distance, an input circuit and means
associated therewith in?uenced by current re
means associated with said input circuit actuated
a rotatory movement in accordance with said
current for selecting and controlling a local cir 45
cuit and means included in said circuit for effect
ing the throw of said carriage when said local
circuit is completed.‘
18. In an apparatus for effecting the remote
control of a typewriter carriage, an input circuit, 50
means associated with said input circuit actuated
ceived through said input circuit for e?ecting the
by current received through it for bringing about
selection of a desired circuit by a rotatory move
ment in accordance with said current and its
.a rotatory mechanical movement in accordance
55 control by the unchanged ?ow in direction or
magnitude of said current.
12. In an apparatus for controlling electrical
circuits at a distance, an input circuit, an elec
trical connecting element, and means associated
60 therewith in?uenced by current received through
said input circuit for bringing about a rotatory
mechanical movement of said electrical connect
ing element in accordance with said current'to
effect ‘the selection of a desired local circuit and
65 its cm/ntrol by the ?ow unchanged in direction or
magnitude of said current.
13. In an apparatus for controlling electrical
circuits at a distance, delayed action circuit con
trolling means, an input circuit, and means as
70 sociated therewith in?uenced by current re
local circuit and means included in said circuit
ceived through said input circuit for bringing
about a rotatory mechanical movement in ac
cordance with said current for selecting local cir
cuits in accordance with said ‘current and e'iIect
'll ing the control at a de?nite desired time interval
10.
with saidcurrent for selecting and controlling a
for e?ecting the throw of said carriage including
means for deenergizing said carriage moving
means at the completion of the throw, when said
local circuit is completed.
19. A method of controlling electrical circuits 60
at a distance comprising providing a plurality of
alternating current voltages individually adjust
ed in accordance with the circuits which it may
be desired to control, individually selecting at
least one of these voltages in accordance with 65
the circuit which it is desired to control, trans
mitting it to a distance and converting it into
a unidirectional current and converting said cur
rent, while maintaining it constant in direction
and magnitude, into a rotatory mechanical move
ment at the receiving point to e?ect the selection
and control of the desired circuit.
20. A method of controlling electrical circuits
at a distance comprising providing a plurality of
alternating current voltages individually adjusted
7
8,114,062
in accordance with the circuits which it may be
desired to control, individually selecting at least
bringing about a rotatory mechanical movement
of said electrical connecting element to e?ect the
one of these voltages in accordance with the cir
cuit which it is desired to control, providing a sec
ond alternating current voltage of a diii’erent
trol.
frequency, controlling this voltage in accordance
with the time at which control of the selected cir
cuit is desired, transmitting these voltages to a
distance and converting them into unidirectional
10 currents and converting said currents into elec
trically distinct mechanical movements at the
receiving point to e?ect the selection and control
of the desired circuit.
,
_'
_
21. A method of controlling electrical circuits
at a distance comprising providing a plurality of
15 alternating current voltages individually adjusted
in accordance with the'circuits which it may be
desired to control, selecting one of these voltages
in accordance with the circuit which it is desired
to control, transmitting it to a distance and con
verting it into a unidirectional current and con
verting said current into a circuit completing ro
tatory mechanical movement at the receiving sta
tion to e?ect the selection and control oi! the
desired circuit.
22. A method of transmitting printable char
acters to a distance comprising providing a plu
rality of alternating current voltages individually
adjusted in accordance with the characters which
30 it may be desired to transmit, individually select
ing at least one voltage in accordance with the
character which it is desired to transmit, trans
mitting this voltage to a distance and converting
it into a unidirectional current and converting
35 said current into a rotatory mechanical move
ment at the receiving station to effect the selec
tion. and production of the desired character.
23. An apparatus for controlling electrical cir
cuits at a distance comprising means for select
ing from a plurality of alternating current volt
ages individually adjusted in accordance with the
circuits which it may be desired to control, at
least one alternating voltage in accordance with
the circuit which it is desired to control, means
for transmitting this voltage to a distance and
means for converting it into a unidirectional cur
rent and converting said current without change
in direction or magnitude into a rotatory me
chanical movement at the receiving point to effect
the selection and control oi'the desired circuit.
24. In an apparatus for controlling electrical
circuits at a distance, an input circuit adapted to
the receipt of alternating current voltages, means
for converting said voltages into unidirectional
currents in accordance with said voltages, an
electrical connecting element, and means associ
ated therewith in?uenced by said unidirectional
current received through said input circuit for
selection or a desired local circuit and its con
'
25. In an apparatus for reproducing printable
characters at a distance, typebars, paper feeding
means associated therewith, local circuits con
trolling said typebars, an input circuit adapted
for the receipt of alternating current voltages,
means for converting said voltages into unidi 10
rectional currents in accordance with said volt
ages and means associated with said unidirec
tional currents in?uenced thereby for bringing
about a rotatory movement for individually se
lecting said local circuits in accordance with said
current and controlling said circuits by said cur
rent.
26. A method of transmitting printable char
acters to a distance comprising providing a plu
rality of voltages individually adjusted in ac 20
cordance with the characters which it may be
desired to transmit, individually selecting at least
one of these voltages in accordance with the
character which it may be desired to transmit,
providing another voltage, controlling this volt
age in accordance with the time at which repro
duction of the selected character is desired, trans
mitting these voltages to a distance, converting
them into currents and converting said currents
into electrically separate mechanical movements
at the receiving point to e?ect the selection and
reproduction of the desired character.
27. A method of transmitting printable char
acters to a distance comprising providing a plu
rality of voltages individually adjusted in ac
cordance with the characters which it maybe
desired to transmit, individually selecting at least
one oi’ these voltages, transmitting it to a dis
tance, converting it into a current and converting
said current into a rotatory mechanical move
ment at the receiving point in accordance with
the character desired to eifect the selection of
the desired character and its reproduction a
de?nitely delayed time interval ‘thereafter as a
result of said selection.
28. In an apparatus for controlling electrical
circuits at a distance, an input circuit adapted to
the receipt of an alternating current voltage,
means for converting said voltage into a unidirec
tional current means associated with said unidi
rectional current and in?uenced by it for bring
ing about a rotatoryvmechanical movement for
e?ecting the selection of the desired circuit in ac
cordance with said current and its control by the
?ow oi’ said current while it is being maintained
constant in direction and magnitude.
PHILIP NORMAN SMITH.
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