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Патент USA US2114355

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April 19, 1938.
,
'
F, A, RAY
~
BUCKLE
Filed Oct. 28, 1936
2,114,355 ,
'
Patented Apr. 19, 1938
'2,114,355
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,114,355
BUCKLE
Frederick A. Ray, West Hollywood, Calif.
Application October 28, 1936, serial No. 197,969
10 Claims. (ol. 24-173)
My invention relates to a buckle of the par
ticular type generally used in connection with
belts, harness straps and the like, and the princi
pal object of my invention is, to provide a. rela
tively simple, strong, efûcient and compact buckle,
Fig. 11 is a horizontal section taken approxi
mately on the line II-II of Fig. 10.
Referring by numerals to the accompanying
drawing, and particularly to the form of buckle
illustrated in Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive, I0 designates
a plate'that is preferably formed of metal and
that is inexpensive of manufacture, presents a
neat and finished appearance, and the parts 0f substantially rectangular in form, and depend
which buckle are capable of being easily and ing from the sides of this plate are narrow walls
quickly connected and disconnected.
‘ I I. Formed integral with the lower edges of these
A further object of my invention, is to pro
10
side walls at one end thereof, are inwardly pre
vide a buckle of vthe type having a body formed sented lips I2 which occupy positions substantially 10
in two parts, one of which carries a ñxed stud or
studs that engage in apertures formed in the belt
or strap to which the buckle is applied, and the
15 stud-carrying body member being retained in its
belt-engaging position by the other body member
of the belt which overlies a portion of the stud
carrying member and the natural pull or strains
on the belt or strap tending to maintain the parti
20 tion of the buckle in properly connected rela
tion.
A further object of my invention, is to provide
a buckle of the character referred to, that is very
compact so that very little width and thickness is
25 added to the over-all dimensions of the belt o
strap to which the buckle is applied.
‘
With the foregoing and other objects in view my
invention consists in certain novel features of
construction and arrangements of parts that will
30 be hereinafter more fully described and claimed
and illustrated in the accompanying drawing in
which:v
`
in accordance with my invention, and showing the
35 same applied to the end portions of a belt or strap.
Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section taken on the line
2_2 of Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is an enlarged cross-section taken on the
l
Fig. 4 is a cross-section taken on the line 4_
of Fig. 1.
-
Fig. 5 is a horizontal section taken approxi
mately on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 6 is a plan View of a modified form of the
45 buckle.
Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section taken on the
line '1_-'I of Fig. 6.l
'
Fig. 8 is a horizontal section. taken approxi
mately on the line 8-8 of Fig. '7.
50
Fig. 9 is a plan view of a further modified form
of the buckle of the type wherein one of the parts
of the buckle body carries a plurality of strap
engaging studs.
-
Fig. 10 is a longitudinal section taken on the line
ist>
Ill-I0 of Fig. 9,
At the opposite end of plate I0, a transverse por
tion is depressed so as to form a lip I3 that occupies
a plane just below that occupied by the main body 15
portion of y plate I0, and secured to and depending
from this depressed lip, are oneor more strap
engaging studs I4.
.
Adapted to overlie the depressed lip I3, is a
strap I5' preferably formed of metal, the length 20
of which is substantially equal to the width of
plate IIJ, and at the ends of said strap I5, portions
thereof are extended downwardly, as designated
by I6, which parts are in `alignment with the
dependingside walls II of plate I0 and from the 25
lower ends of said depending portions I6, the end
portions of the metal vstrap forming the overlying
member I5 and end walls I6 are extended in
wardly to form lips I1 that are arranged parallel
with and spaced apart from the end portions of 30
the overlying member I5.
-
Fig. 1 is a plan view of a buckle constructed
line 3--3 of Fig. 1.
parallel with and a short distance below the cor
responding end portion of the plate I0.
„
-
When the two parts of the buckle are properly
assembled to close or secure the buckle, strap I5
overlies the depressed end portion I3 of plate I0.
The intermediate portion of a piece of thin 35
resilient metal that is folded double, lies immedi
ately above and below the lips I2, as designated by
I8, and the doubled portions of this piece of metal
are secured to each other at points adjacent those 40
portions that overlie the lips I2 by suitable fas
tening means, such as rivets I9.
>
ì The intermediate portions of the two thick
nesses of resilient metal that overlie the ears I2
are cut away so as to form at the sides of the 45
resilient member, pairs of arms 20 that are dis
posed lengthwise of the buckle at the sides there
of, said arms being positioned above and below
the inwardly projecting ears I'I and extending a
short distance beyond said ears, and the ends 50
of these arms are connected by integral cross l
>members 2l.
Inasmuch as the metal from which the parts I8
and 20 are formed is resilient, the pairs of arms
2U which extend above and below the inwardly 65
2
2,114,355
presented lips I1 will yleldingly resist any tend
end members 21, and projecting at right angles
ency of said lips to tilt or swing so as to sepa
inwardly toward each other from the lower ends
rate
of said end members 21 are ears 28.
the
members
comprising the
resilient
Depending from the ends of plate 24 are end
arms 20.
When this form of buckle is secured to a strap,
one end of the latter is formed into a loop 22
that passes around the transverse end members
2| that connect the ends of the resilient arms 20,
and the free end of said strap is secured to= the
body of the strap in any suitable manner, pref
erably by means of one or more rivets such as R.
walls 29, and projecting at right angles inwardly
from the lower portions of these end walls 29
are ears 30. The depressed portion 25 of plate 24
carries one or more studs 3| that are adapted to
engage in the perforations of a belt or strap B.
A thin plate of resilient metal is bent‘double to 10
form practically identical upper and lower mem
When this form of buckle is used on a belt, one bers 32, and positioned between said members
end of the latter is connected to the transverse“ adjacent the point where the sheet of metal is
members 2 I, and the opposite end portion of the» bent are the ears 28 that project inwardly from
15
belt which is provided with spaced apertures 23, the lower ends of the end walls 21.
The ears 30 that project inwardly from the
passes beneath the overlying member I5 and the
body 20, with the stud I4 positioned in one of the lower ends of the end walls 29 are positioned be
tween the layers or parts of the resilient plate,
apertures 23.
When the buckle is closed the end 'of rstud I4> and formed in the end portions of the members
projects entirely through one of the perforations
23 in the end of the belt, and the projecting end
of said stud engages against the cross member
that connects the ‘endsv of thearms 20 opposite
the transverse members 2 I, as illustrated by solid
lines in Fig. 2 and by dotted lines in Fig. 5.
When the bolt to which my improved buckle
is applied, is in service, the pulling strains im
pressed on the connected ends of the belt tend to
maintain the parts of the buckle in properly con
30 nected relation, for ' the pulling strains
irn
pressed on’ the resilientY arms 210 are transmittedV
to member I5 so as to hold the same firmly in
position over'the depressed' portion I3 that car
ries-the belt-engaging stud I4, andthe pulling
35 strains impressed on the perforated end portion
of the belt directed against the stud I4 main
tains the Vdepressedv end portion I3 of plate It
beneath the overlying strap I5.
40
>
l
To disconnect the parts of the buckle, the ends
of the strap or belt that are connected by the
buckle are drawn toward'each other, so as to
move the buckle members I0 and I5 away from
each other, and when member VI 5 has been moved
into-position ïso -as to wholly uncover thev under
45 lying depressed member I3,> the end of plate I 0
carrying said depressed member and the stud |4
is swung upward a sufficient distance to disen
gage stud I4 from the aperture 23v> in which it
was engaged.
50
v
f
During this swinging or tilting movement of
member IIl, the ears I2 ’disposed between the pairs
of resilient legs 20 function as an axis on >which
member I0 moves'an'd the members of the pairs
of resilient legs 2|) are yieldingly forced apart vto
55 accommodate the movement of the ears I2, and
after the belt or strap has been disengaged from
the stud I4,- the member I0 will be swung toward
the'perforated end of the belt by the‘pressure vof'
60
the resilient legs 20 against the ears I2.
In order that this form of buckle may present
‘a balanced appearance, the upper' or outer face
of plate Ill is` provided with a transverse groove
G ‘adjacent theend opposite the end having the
depressed lip I3, and thuswhen vthe buckle is
65 properly connected, the front face thereof ' ap*
pears as a rectangular panel with parallel groves
disposed adjacent the ends ofthe buckle body. -
In the modified form' of buckle illustrated in
Figs. 6 to 8 inclusive, Ythe main body'portion of
70 the buckle comprises a plate 24, one side edge of ‘
which is slightly depressed, asA designated by 25,
" and adapted to overlie this depressed portion 25'
is a plate 26‘that is approximately equal in length
to the length of plate 24.
Depending from the ends‘of rplate 26 are short
75
32^beyond the ears 30 are coinciding apertures 33. 20
The'transverse members 34 at v`the outer end of.
aperture 33 combine ‘to forma cross-bar or the
like, around'which is looped one end 'of the belt
or'strap B and the portions thereof adjacent this
cross-bar being united in- any suitable manner; 25
for instance, by a rivet or rivets or by a transverse
row of stitches.
`
Formed in the upper one 'of'the members 32
adjacent the end where'the >same is bent, is a
longitudinally disposed slot 35‘for the accommo 30
dation of the 'lower'end'of'stud 3|" when the
buckle is closedjsee Fig. 7.
K
Where this form of buckle is used, the pulling
strains impressed ‘upon Athe connected parts of
the belt or strap tend to hold theparts of the 35
buckle in assembled relation an’d’with plate 26
overlying the depressed portion 25'of plate 24,> so
as to hold the parts ofthe buckle together and
with the stud 3| in'one ofthe apertures‘of the
. belt or strap.
To ldisconnect this form of buckle, the con
nected ends of the belt or strap are moved toward
each other, k‘thereby moving the parts of the
buckle away from'each >other oruntil the de
pressed portion 25 of plate 24`is free from over-> 45
lying plate 26, and under such‘conditions the de
pressed end of plate 24 may be swung away` from
the perforated portion of-the belt or strap so as
to disengage the stud'3I from> >the aperture'in
whichv it has been positioned.V
1
During >this swinging-movement of the buckle
member carrying stud 3|, the ears 30 positioned
between the sidesof the- resilient members 32
function as an axis, and lafter the <belt or strap
has been disengaged from'the stud-'2 I, the pres
sure of the resilient members- 32 on the interposed
ears 30 acts to return the buckle member’carry
ing the stud> 3| to its normal position.
The modiñed construction illustrated in Figs.
9, 10 and 1l isv embodied in the-larger sizeof
buckles or those intended for use in connectiony
with harnes’s'or for'lequip'menthaving compara
tively large and heavy straps.' This form4 of
buckle comprises a loop having an»y upper or outer
plate 36 and a lower or inner plate 31, the'latter
being' slightly wider i than' ‘ thev Vplate 36.
Associated with this loop is a buckle mem
ber comprising an‘upper or outer plate 38, one
side portion of which is depressed to form a lip
39," which when the'parts lof _the‘buckle are con
nected, lies beneath the plate 36 >of the loop'.
Y
Seated "in and‘ldepending'fromï underlying lip
39 are'tWo or more studs 4I) that‘are Vadapted
to engage "in tapertures 44I I"that" are» formed -in ^ a
strap s that passes through the-buckle*imme-`
a
3
2,114,355-,
diately beneath the plate 138 andI its depressed
lip 39.
"
'
Depending from the ends of the plate 38 are end
members 42, and connecting the lower ends of
these end members is a transverse bar »43 that
normally occupies a position directly in front of
plate 31. Arranged beneath the plates 31'in any
suitable manner, preferably by means-:ofA a rivet
44, is a centrally arranged strip 45 of vresilient
metal which projects a short distance lbeyond
strap or plate 43 and the end of said strap 45
terminating in a hook 46. One end of. a resilient
metal strip 41, which overlies plate 43, is secured
to plate 31 by the rivet 44, and the free end of
this strip 41 terminates adjacent the hook 46 on
strip 45. Thus the transverse plate or strap
43 is positioned to move freely between the re
silient strips 45 and 41 and said strips function
as springs, and yieldingly resist any tendency of
20 the strap or plate 43 to tilt in either direction.
Overlying and underlying the plates 31 and 43
and the resilient strips 45 and 41 that are carried
by plate 31, are the ends of straps fr, the ends of
which are suitably secured to each other at a
25
point just beyond the outer edge of plate 31, and
which securing means may be rivets or a trans-k
verse row of stitching as illustrated in Figs. l0
and 11.
In this form of buckle, the pulling strains im
pressed o-n the straps s and :c tend to hold the
parts of the buckle in assembled relation and
with the plate 36 overlying the lip 39 and the lat
ter carrying the studs 40 that engage in the
apertures of strap s.
To disconnect this form of buckle, the con
nected ends of the straps s and a: are moved to
ward each other for a short distance or until lip
39 has been disengaged from its position beneath
plate 36, and the plate 38 carrying the lip may
40 now be swung upward so as to disengage the studs
40 from the apertures 4I in which they have been
engaged, and this movement of plate 38 is yield
ingly resisted by the resilient strips 45 and 41,
between which the strap or plate 43 is positioned.
After the strap s has been disengaged from the
45
buckle, the pressure of the resilient strips 45 and
41 on strap or plate 43 acts to swings the parts
38 and 39 of the buckle back to their normal
positions.
inclusive; the endv of ‘the `stud-3l that projects
through> the perforation in the strap bears against
the end of the slot 35 in the upper end of mem
bers 32 , thus transmitting all pullinglstrains on
the strapto the body 24 of the buckle and the
plates 32.`
'
n;
~
.-'
i
.
In my improved buckle the stud or ystuds tha
engage in the -perforations of the belt or' strap
project through the latter at right 'angles and
thus the strapor'belt is‘engaged and held in a
practically straight line, particularly at the point
of application of strains and stresses, without
marring or bendingthe leather at the point of
connection, and as the body of the buckle com
prises two cooperating transverse loops that vpass
around the belt or strap at >the point of appli- -.
cation of strains, the _belt or strap is protected
from spreading and bulging'at the point of con-~
nection.
-
.
.
'
i
'
»
Obviously, my improved buckle may be advan 20,.
tageously employed wherever it is desired to de
tachably connect or unite two straps or the ends.
of a single strap, such as a belt, and in addition'
to presenting a neat and finished appearance
the buckle provides an exceptionally strong, dur 25...’
able, eiiicient and easily manipulated connection
for all straps, belts and the like.
It will beunderstood that minor changes in'
the size, form and construction of the Various
parts of my improved buckle kmay be made and 30',
substituted for those herein shown and described
without departing from the spirit of my inven
tion, the scope of >which is set forth in the ap
pended claims.
- «
l
I claim as my invention:
l '
3.59.
l. In a buck1e„a pair of cooperating body
members adapted, when engaged with one’ anl
other, to receive a strap, a strap-engaging stud
carried by one of said body members, a pair of
resilient members secured to and projecting from 40
the lower portion of the other one of said body
members and means secured to the stud-carry
ing body member and passing between said re
silient members to form a sliding fulcrum for
said stud-carrying body member when the lat 45
ter is disengaged from the other body member.
2. In a buckle, a pair of cooperating body
members adapted, when engaged with one an
is closed so as to secure the ends of a belt or
other, to receive a strap, a strap-engaging stud
carried by one of said members, a pair of re 50
silient members secured to and projecting from
the lower portion of the other one of said body
members, means secured to the stud-carrying
body member and passing between said resilient
members to form a sliding fulcrum for said stud 55
carrying body member when the latter is dis
engaged from the other body member and a
strap, all pulling strains tending to separate the
portion of which stud-carrying body member
connected ends of the belt or strap are utilized
60 for holding the parts of the buckle in proper as
underlies a portion of said second mentioned
50
Thus it will be seen that I have provided a
buckle'that is relatively simple in construction,
inexpensive of manufacture and very effective in
performing the functions for which it is intended.
The buckle is very compact, and therefore adds
55 very little to the thickness of the strap or straps
with which it is associated, and when the buckle
sembled relation, thus making it impossible for
the parts of the buckle to become separated while
body member when the parts of the buckle are 60
properly connected.
3. In a buckle, a pair of cooperating body
the connected ends of the belt or strap are under
members having releasably interengaging parts
pulling strains.
and adapted when connected to receive a strap,
resilient members secured to and projecting from 65
one of said body members, means projecting
from the other body member and passing be
tween said resilient members and a strap-engag
In the construction illustrated in Figs. 1 to 5,
inclusive, the lower end of the stud i4, when the
buckle is closed, engages against the cross mem
ber that connects the ends of the resilient arms
20 opposite the transverse arms 2 l, and thus both
70 ends of the stud have ñrm rigid bearings that
transmit all pulling strains of the perforated end
of the belt or strap to the plate I0 and the doubled
member I8 that provides the resilient arms 28
and which is connected to plate I0.
75 In the construction illustrated in Figs. 6 to 8
65
ing stud carried by the sliding and swinging body
member.
70
4. In a buckle, a pair of cooperating body
members having releasably interengaging parts
and adapted when connected to receive a strap,
resilient members secured to and projecting from
one of said body members, means projecting from 75
the other body member and passing between' said'
resilient members vand a portion of one of 'which'
body members underlies a portion of the, other
body member when the parts of the buckle are
î closed and in engagement with a strap.
5. In a buckle, the combination with a belt
receiving loop and a pair of substantially paral
lel' resilient members secured to and‘projecting
from a portion of said loop, of a buckle member
10! mounted for sliding andftilting `movement upon
said resilient members and having a'portion that
is adapted to underlie a portion of said loop when
the parts of the buckle are in closed position.
6. In a'buckle, the combination> with a belt
15” receiving loop and avpair of vsubstantially paral
lel‘resilient members secured to and projecting
from‘a portion of‘said loop', of a buckle member
mounted for'sliding and Ytilting movement upon
said resilient members, having a portion that is
adapted to underlie a portion of said loop when
the parts of the buckle lare in closed position and
a belteengaging'stud carried by the'r underlying
portion of said sliding and tilting buckle body
25 :i
member.
'7. In a buckle, the combination :with a belt
receiving loop and a pair of substantially paral
lel resilient members secured torand> projecting
from a‘portion of said loop, of a'buckle member
mounted for sliding and tilting movementupon30 vvsaid resilient members,` having a portion that is
adapted to underlie a portion of said loop when'
8. Ina buckle, a `pair of cooperating body
members adapted to receive a strap, resilient
members secured to and projecting from one of
said> body members and» engaging a part of the
other body member to form a sliding fulcrum
between said-members, a strap engaging stud
projecting at right angles from one of said body
members, the end of which stud is adapted to
engage one of said resilient members when the
buckle is closed, and a portion of the body mem 10
ber that carries said stud occupying a position
beneath the other body member When the buckle
is closed.
9. In a buckle,- a pair of cooperating body
members adapted to receive a strap, resilient 15
members secured to and projecting from one of
said body members and engaging a part of the
other body member to form a sliding fulcrum
between saidmembers, a strap engaging stud
projecting at right angles from one of said body 20
members, the end of which stud is adapted to
engage one of said resilient members when the
buckle is closed, a portion of the body member
that carries said stud occupyinga position be
neath the other body member when the buckle 25
is closed, and said resilient members being pro
vided With openings for the reception of a strap
or the like.
10. In a buckle, a pair of cooperating body
members having releasably interengaging parts 30
the parts of the buckle are‘in closed'position, a
and adapted, when connected, to receive a strap,
resilient members'secured-to and projecting from
belt-engaging stud carried by the underlying por
tion of said sliding and tilting buckle body mem
ber and said resilient members 'being provided
withv openings for the reception of 'a strap or
the like.-
from the other body member and extending be
tween said resilient members to form a sliding 35
fulcrum between said members.
one of said body members and means projecting
FREDERICK A. RAY.
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