close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2114539

код для вставки
April 19, 1938.
2,114,539
H. R. MaCMlCHAEL
SHOE TREE AND BACK
Filed Feb. 27, 1937
2 Sheets-Sheet l
INVENTOR.
HUGH K. MCMCHA EL
Ma
@uev
ATTORNEY .
April 19, 1938.
H.-R. MaCMICHAEL
2,114,539
SHOE TREE AND RACK
Filed Feb’ 27, 1937
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
g
a
IO
27
8 f-/ 7
25
it
INVENTOR.
HUGH P. MacMc/mzx
By? M w
ATTORNEY .
Patented Apr. 19, 1938
2,114,539
‘UNITED ‘STATES
PATENT ‘OFFICE
2,114,539
SHOE TREE AND RACK
Hugh n. MacMichael, Piedmont, Calif.
Application February 27, 1937, Serial No. 128,241
14 Claims. (Cl. 12-1285)
This invention relates to shoe trees and a sup
porting rack useable in combination therewith.
Some of the objects of this invention may be
noted as the following: to provide ashoe tree’
and rack combination whereon a shoe may be
treed with substantially as little effort as would
be required to place it upon a shelf; and to pro
vide said combination adapted for ?rmly attach
ing to a wall or other means of support, and. there
10 after» adapted for use with substantially no man
ual handling or ‘direct manipulation of any. part
of said combination for the treeing on or removal
therefrom of a shoe.
'
spring ratchet slide partly in section;
Fig. 5 is a reduced front elevation of the device
arranged for a vertically-extending rack‘;
Fig. 6 is a plan of Fig. 5;
15 subject said treed shoe only to light stresses ef
fective to straighten it and smooth out the vamp
by adjustable resilient pressure applied at longi
tudinally spaced points generally perpendicularly
and vertically against respectively the toe insole,
vamp, and shank of said shoe; to provide side
members on said tree adapted to exert adjustable
resilient pressure laterally outwards against the
sides of the vamp part of the shoe; to effect said
treeing stresses substantially free of harmful
25' stretching effect in the treed shoe which latter is
frequently observed with the use of shoe trees
most commonly used heretofore; to provide a tree
with highly resilient ?exible and adjustable char
acteristics throughout adapting‘ it for effective
but harmless use for a considerable range in size,
form and weight of shoes; and having the means
of said adjustments simple, non-detachable and
effective in respect both to the conformation and
resilient characteristics of said tree, with‘ the ion
gitudinal adjustment operable even after a shoe
is placed thereonand independently of the lateral
~
Another object is to provide an effective, shoe
straightening tree useable in detached form
40 which, by one hand, may easily be pushed directly
into a shoe held in the other hand, said oper
ation being devoid of the hitherto common ne
cessity of thereafter having to ?ex and insert a
powerful spring-supported or toggle-jointed
45 member.
Other objects are to provide the aforesaid ad
vantageous characteristics, insaid tree and rack
V
-
Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the shoe tree in
another mode provided with adjustable side 10
members;
'
Fig. 8 is a partial plan looking upward to Fig.
7;
Other objects are: to provide a tree which will
adjustment.
Fig. 2 is a plan of Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a shoe tree mount
ed on a short length of wall-rack;
Fig. 4 is an enlarged side elevation of the shank
and
‘
I
Fig. 9 is a cross-section taken on the line 9--9
of Fig. 7.
_
'
g
’
15
Referring to the drawings, a shoe-tree body
I0 is provided with a forward part I I having the
shoe-contact surfaces‘lZ and I3 adapted respec
tively to contact downward on the toe-end insole
(contact l2) and upward against the vamp (con 20
tact l3) of a treed shoe. Said body H! has the
rearwardly-extending arm part l4 notched on
its lower side to form the ratchet teeth I 5.
The rear end l6 of said arm 14 is adapted for
?xed mounting in the socket I 1 of the supporting
rack-arm l8 extending crosswise from the mount
ed shoe-tree to a ?xed attachment on the rack
20 which latter may carry a plurality of said rack
arms suitably spaced on its length. Said rack
20 may be screwed to ‘a supporting wall or ward
robe door 22 or provided with other means of
support.
A
'
'
longitudinally - extending
highly - ?exible
spring shank member 25 is attached at its for
ward end 25a to the lower side of said body toe
end H, and at its rear end 25b is attached to an
encircling ratchet pawl slide 2'! which latter
loosely encircles said notched arm M for adjust
ably positioned support thereon. Said slide 21
is provided on its lower rear part with the pawl 40
projection 28, adapted to engage upward with one
of said ratchet teeth l5, and the forwardly
spaced upper fulcrum part 29 of said encircling
slide 21, adapted to contact downward on the top
of said arm l4.
Under resilient pressure exert
able by said attached shank-spring 25, said slide
pivots downward on its said forward fulcrum
in a design having very few parts, each and all
part 29 therebyrotating its rearward pawl part
suitable for quantity production, light in weight
Other advantages will become
28 up into engagement with said arm teeth [5
adapted to prevent rearward movement of said 50
apparent.
engaged ratchet slide 21.
50, and low in cost.
Illustrating my invention are the drawings
herewith in which
7
Fig. 1 is a front elevation of a horizontal wall
rack combination having a pair of shoe trees;
A user may readily
disengage said pawl to allow it resiliently to move
rearward, or by ‘a direct push he may slide it for-‘
ward against the pressure of said shank spring.
In fully extended position to the rear,v said 55
2
2,114,539
shank spring 25 will resiliently ?atten out and
lie generally parallel and but slightly stressed
adjacent the underside of said body [6. As said
slide 21 is ratcheted adjustably forward, it will
force said spring shank 25 into an increasingly
stressed generally semi-elliptical form which in
its mid-length 30 is adapted to contact downward
against the shank part of a treed shoe. In its
extreme forward position said spring 25 will ap
proximate the form illustrated by dotted lines 3|
(see Fig. 1).
The arrangement as shown in Fig. 1 is for
treeing a pair of shoes with latter positioned
respectively heel-to-heel, and it is adapted for
15 use only in a horizontal position.
If it were
turned to the vertical, one of the shoes would
fall off. The shoe also positions generally hori
zontally and is entirely supported, against gravity
and the downward pressures of the shank con
tact 30 and the toe contact I2, by means of the
upwardly pressing vamp contact I3. Most of the
shoe cantilevers back from said supporting con
tact I3, and the weight thus overhung tends to
straighten the shoe and thereby materially re
25 duces the shoe-straightening force otherwise re
quired from said shank spring 25 contacting the
shoe shank at 30. This effect is highly advan
tageous in permitting the use of a lighter spring,
and particularly so in requiring less resiliently
. exerted pressure thereby minimizing the tendency
(which would exist with a stronger spring) to
apply so much resilient pressure to a shoe as
(see Fig. 3) or it may be provided with a knob
52 adapted for conveniently handling the tree
when not mounted.
Diifering from said shoe-tree body [0 of Fig. 1,
the body 40 (see Figs. 7, 8, and 9) is provided
with the hinged sides 66 each attached at the
upper edge by the hinge members 6| and 62, each
of said hinged sides being independently ad
justably resiliently moveable inwardly as indi
cated by position lines 60a and outwardly as in 10
dicated by lines 6012.
Said sides 60 are provided
with the inwardly-extending rearwardly-posi
tioned perforated lugs 65 engaging the rear-ends
of the “wish-bone” wire spring 66 whose forward
ends loosely encircle said body lug 50 'and is
retained loosely in place thereabout by the under
lying said screwed-on shank spring end 4117.
Extending across between the sides of said spring
66 is the adjusting member 10 whose encircling
‘end parts ‘H and 12 are longitudinally adjust 20
ably positioned on said spring 66 by means. of
the slidable resilient split-ring clinch collars ‘I3.
Said adjusting ‘member part ‘II is threaded to
engage the sleeve nut 14 also slidably engaged by
the ball-end 15 of said part 12.
In use, said lateral adjustment is workable
(a) by a variable longitudinal positioning of one
or both ends of said adjustment member 10 along
the sides of said “wish-bone” spring 66; (b) by:
means ‘of said sleeve nut 14 adapted to limit the 30
maximum width of the tree while permitting a
resiliently-resisted narrowing thereof; and (c)
injuriously to “over-straighten” and distort it. : j
The shank-spring 25 form and resultant shoe
35 straightening stress may be adjusted even after
a shoe is treed on this device, as the adjusting
ratchet slide 21 is always readily accessible (see
Fig. 1) . Once adjusted however, nothing remains
to be done but to slipthe shoe on and off the tree
40 until a substantially different size, form or type
of shoe to be treed makes a different adjustment
desirable.
Said tree may also be used unmounted in which’
by permitting said hinged sides 60 to position
themselves, relative to the longitudinal axis of
the tree body 40, adaptably for either right or left 35
case a knob or loop may be attached on the arm
ening de-wrinkling tension is thus exerted on the 45
shoe vamp while completely avoiding the useless
45 end I6 for convenience'in grasping manually.
In another arrangement (see Figs. 5 and 6) the
device may be constructed with a vertically ex
tending rack 33 provided with a plurality of
vertically-spaced said rack-arms l8 adapted to
50 carry said shoe-tree bodies 10 extending alter
nately to the right and to the left.
While I have shown said spring 25 as being
?rmly attached at the toe-end and adjustably
attached at the always-accessible rear end, in
55
respect simply to adjustment the arrangement
is obviously reversible, and the rear end could-be
?rmly attached and the forward'end made ad
justably positioning.
-
In another mode laterally resilient and ad
60 justable (see Figs. r1, 8, and 9)lthe shoe tree»
body 46 is provided with the forward part- 4|
having the shoe-contact surfaces 42 and 43
adapted respectively to contact downward on the
toe-end insole (contact 42) and upward against
65 the vamp (contact 43) of a treed shoe.
Said
shoes.
The advantages of the foregoing are
found by test to be substantial, and especially
in said tree having also the separately-adjustable
longitudinal shoe-straightening means.
The longitudinal straightening with my tree is
done by means of lightly exerted pressures per
pendicularly applied at three spaced points along
the length’of the shoe, and an effective straight
harmfulv longitudinal stretching of the whole shoe
as frequently produced by other types of trees.“
The adjustable resiliently pressing side mem
bers need exert only a very light lateral pressure.
(substantially lighter than said longitudinally.
straightening pressures)’ thereby lightly holding
the sides of the’ shoe'vamp distended, smooth and
free of wrinkles.
_
,
.
Said lightly exerted longitudinaland lateral 55
pressures effective with my tree are in striking
contrast to those heavy pressures exerted by the
conventional powerfully acting. shank-spring or
toggle-(jointed. shoe-tree members exerting= an
indeterminate force unnecessarily stretching a 60
shoe length-wise; which force. in some trees is
used even more powerfully by applying it to lat
erally acting wedge-like members, severely strain
ing the stitching in a shoe while accomplishing.
no good purpose not harmlessly secured by my 65
body 46 has the rearwardly extending arm part
lightly laterally-pressing tree.
44 notched on its lower side to form the ratchet
I have found that various modi?cations, sub
stitutions and transpositions may be made in the
preferred construction of my device herein set
forth, and others may occur to those skilled in
mechanical arts. For instance, for obtaining ad-v
justment of the resilient characteristics and form
of spring, various mechanical details including
slidable levers or Wedges,'rotatable eccentrics and
others are adaptable, some of such alternatives 75
teeth 45 engageable with the arm-encircling.
ratchet slide 46 attached to the rear-end of the
70 shank spring 41 adapted at its ?exed middle part
47a to contact downward against the shank part
of a shoe, and screwed at its forward end 411)
on the projecting lug 50 on the underside of said
body forward part 4!. The rear~end of said
75 arm 44 may be mounted on a ?xed rack support
-
2,114,639
being disclosed in my pending application Ser.
No. 69,679 of March 19, 1936.»
-'
a
" i ‘
Having described a novel'shoe tree, ‘optionally
in combination with- supporting means, adapted
for use with an ease and convenience which I
have been unable to discover elsewhere, I wish
to claim broadly the principles‘of construction
pertaining
thereto.
WhatIclaim is:
10'
'
r
--
'
‘
l
1
‘
'
.
f
and upward on the vamp of a treed shoe; a reare
ward-1y extending arm part of said tree; I a wall
rack having an outwardly extending rack-arm
adapted to the ?xed support of saidtree-arm'with
said tree occupying a generally horizontal posi
tion wherein a treed shoe may be supported
against gravitation by said vamp contact, with
the overhanging rear part of said shoe gravita
tionally exerting a shoe-straightening force’. in
cooperation with the like force exerted by ‘said
adapted to exert resilient pressure downward on
the shank of a treed shoe; and means including
a ratchet device whereby one of said attached
extending body part, adapted to be inserted in a
shoe; side contact members hinged to said body
ends may be longitudinally adjustably positioned
ing axes to press adaptably against the vamp
sides of said shoe; spring means adapted to exert 20
2. A shoe straightening tree comprising a lon
gitudinally-extending body; contact surfaces on
said body adapted to contact downward against
the toe insole and upward against the vamp
25 of a treed shoe; a flexible spring member at
tached at its ends to said body, and in its mid
dle part adapted to exert resilient pressure down
ward on the shank of. a treed shoe; and means
including a ratchet device whereby one of said
30 attached ends may be longitudinally adjustably
positioned on said body; said spring member
being adapted also to exert resilient pressure for
holding said ratchet device in engagement.
3. A shoe straightening tree comprising a lon
gitudinally-extending body; contact surfaces on
said body adapted to contact downward against
the toe insole and upward against the vamp of
a treed shoe; a generally semi-elliptic longitudi
nally-extending spring member attached at its
40 ends to said body and in its middle part adapt
ed to exert resilient pressure downward on the
shank of a treed shoe; and means including a
ratchet device whereby one of said attached ends
may be longitudinally adjustably positioned on
45 said body.
4. A shoe straightening tree comprising a lon
gitudinally-extending body; contact surfaces on
said body adapted to contact downward against
the toe insole and upward against the vamp of
50 a treed shoe; a generally semi-elliptic longitudi
nally-extending spring member attached at its
ends to said body and in its middle part adapt
ed to exert resilient pressure downward on the
shank of a treed shoe; and means including a
ratchet device whereby one of said attached ends
may be longitudinally adjustably positioned on
said body; said spring member being adapted
also to exert resilient pressure for holding said
ratchet device in engagement.
5. A shoe straightening tree comprising a lon
gitudinally-extending body; contact surfaces on
said body adapted to contact downward against
the toe insole and upward against the vamp of
downward pressure contact on said shoe shank.
7. A shoe tree having a central longitudinally 15
enabled to swing about longitudinally extend.- .
resilient pressure outwards on said hinged mem
bers; and means adapted to limit the outward
spreading movement of and between said hinged
members.
8. A shoe tree having a central longitudinally 25
extending body part, adapted to be inserted in
a shoe; side contact members hinged to said
body enabled to swing about longitudinally ex
tending axes to press adaptably against the vamp
sides of said shoe; spring means adapted to exert 30
resilient pressure outward on said hinged mem
bers; and means adapted adjustably to limit the
outward spreading movement of and between said
hinged members.
9. A shoe tree having a central longitudinally 35
extending body part, adapted to be inserted in a
shoe; side contact members hinged to said body
enabled to swing about longitudinally extending
axes to press adaptably against the vamp sides
of said shoe; spring means adapted to exert re 40
silient pressure outward on said hinged mem
bers; and means of adjustment acting on said
spring means adapted to control the resilient
pressure characteristic thereof.
10. A shoe tree adapted to be inserted in a shoe 45
for the smoothing straightening thereof com
prising vertically acting contact parts adapted
respectively to exert downward pressures on the
toe-end insole and the shank part, and upward
pressure on the vamp part of a treed shoe; side 50
contact members of said tree hinged thereon to
swing about longitudinally extending axes, en
abled to exert lateral pressure adaptably on the
vamp sides of said shoe; spring means affecting
all said contacts adapted to sustain thereon re 55
silient pressure; and means of adjustment acting
on said spring means adapted to control the re
silient pressure characteristics thereof.
11. A shoe tree adapted to be inserted in a
shoe for the smoothing straightening thereof 60
comprising vertically acting contact parts adapt
body adapted to the generally rigid support there
ed respectively to exert downward pressures on
the toe-end insole and the shank part, and up
ward pressure on the vamp part of a treed shoe;
side contact members of said tree hinged thereon ~65
of from external supporting means; a general
to swing about longitudinally extending axes,
ly semi-elliptic longitudinally-extending spring
enabled to exert lateral pressure adaptably on
the vamp sides of said shoe; spring means a?ect
a treed shoe; an extending arm part of said
65
be inserted in a shoe and to make therein lon
gitudinally-spaced pressure contacts respective
ly downward on the toe end and the shank part,
1. A shoe straightening tree comprising a lon
gitudinally-extending body; contact surfaces on
said body adapted to contact downward against
the toe insole and upward against the vamp of
a treed shoe; a ?exible spring member attached
at its ends to said body, and in its middle part
20 on said body.
60
e
member having one end attached near the for
ward end of said body, adapted in its mid-length
70 to exert pressure contact downward on the shank
ing all said contacts adapted to sustain thereon
resilient pressure; and means of adjustment act
70
of a treed shoe; and ratchet means attached
to the rear end of said spring, slidably mount
ing on said relatively positioned contacts adapted
to- regulate the relative positioning thereof.
ed on said arm.
12. A shoe tree having a central longitudinally
extending body part, adapted to be inserted in a
shoe; side contact parts of said tree enabled to 75
6. In a shoe straightening tree and wall rack
75 combination comprising a shoe tree adapted to
2,114,639
swing out laterally to press adaptably against the
vamp sides of said shoe; and means of adjustment
whereby said lateral swinging of said side parts
maybe adjustably limited.
14. A shoe tree having a central longitudinally
extending body part, adapted to be inserted in a
shoe; side contact parts of said tree enabled to
swing out laterally to press adaptably against the
vamp sides of said shoe; spring means adapted
13. A shoe tree having a central longitudinally
extending body part, adapted to be inserted in a
shoe; side contact parts of said tree enabled to
swing out laterally to press adaptably against'the
to exert resilient pressure outward on said side
parts; and‘ means of adjustment acting on said
spring means adapted to control the resilient
vamp sides of said shoe; spring means adapted
pressure characteristics thereof.
10 to exert resilient pressure outward on said side
parts; and means of adjustment whereby said
lateral swinging of said side parts may be ad
justably limited.
10
’ >
HUGH R. MACMICHAEL.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
655 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа