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Патент USA US2114553

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April 19, 1938.
a c_ WOODFORD
. 2,114,553
SEPARATOR
Filed June 24, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet l
Swan/1M
Bronson C. Wooa’forc/
April 19, 1938-
I >
B. c. WQODFORD
2,114,553
SEI’ARATOR
Filed June 24, 1936
‘2 Sheets-Sheet 2
Patented Apr. 19, 1938
2,114,553
UNITED sTArss
'i' Oil’FlC
2,114,553
SEPARATOR
Bronson C. Woodford, Dallas, Tex., assignor to
The Murray Company, Dallas, Tex, a corpo
ration of Texas
Application June 24, 1936, Serial No. 87,020
9 Claims. (CI. 19—75)
This invention relates to new and useful im
The invention will be more readily understood
provements in separators.
from a reading of the following speci?cation and
One object of the invention is to provide an by reference to the accompanying drawings, in
improved cotton separator which will efficiently which an example of the invention is shown, and
5 drop the cotton from the airstream which draws wherein:
the cotton from the wagon, or other source.
An important object of the invention is to pro
vide an improved cotton separator which is so
constructed that a continuous suction or pull may
10 ‘be effected, which makes for more e?icient feed
ing of the cotton into the separator.
An important object of the invention is to‘ pro
vide an improved cotton separator wherein a por
tion of the separating screen ‘extends over the in
let, with means for wiping the entire surface of
the screen, whereby upon the introduction of the
cotton into the separator, the air is immediately
separated
20
therefrom
and
passes
upwardly
Figure 3 is a transverse, vertical sectional view 10
of the same,
Figure 4 is an enlarged, partial vertical, sec
tional View of the vacuum wheel,
Figure 5 is a front elevation of the same, and
having a portion of the casing broken away, and
Figure 6 is an enlarged partial perspective‘ of
the paddle wheel.
In the drawings, the numeral iii designates an
air-tight casing or housing which is preferably
Still another object of the invention is to pro
vide a cotton sepaartor' having an open reel
constructed of sheet metal, or other suitable ma
terial. An enlarged air conduit ii is connected
to the lower end of the rear wall of the housing
which permits the cotton to quickly fall down
25 "wardly within said separatorby gravity.
A further object of the invention is to provide
an improved separator wherein the incoming
cotton is dropped into a deadair space, and
means for removing the cotton from‘ this space,
30 whereby the cotton emitting from the separator
is entirely free of air.
Still another object of the invention is to pro
vide a separator having a comparatively coarse
screen therein, with means for constantly keep
35 ‘mg the entire surface of said . screen clean,
whereby the air may readily pass therethrough
and also whereby particles of dirt, or other ex
traneous matter may also be separated from the
cotton.
A particular object of the invention is to pro
vide an improved cotton separator having a flared
inlet, whereby choking of said inlet is obviated
and also whereby the incoming cotton may ex
pand to open up said cotton and separate the
45
removed,
through said screen.
therein, whereby substantially no obstruction to
the cotton introduced ‘into the separator is had,
40
Figure l is a perspective View of a separator,
constructed in accordance with the invention,
Figure 2 is a similar view, having an end wall
docks thereof, which greatly improves the condi
tion of the same.
A still further object of the invention is to
provide an improved vacuum paddle wheel for a
cotton separator which is simple and sturdy in
50 ‘construction, and which is arranged so that its
?exible blades may be readily replaced without
removing the wheel from the separator.
A construction designed to carry out the in
vention will be hereinafter described, together
55,.with other features of the invention.
to.0:
and communicates with the interior thereof.
The conduit is preferably disposed at an angle so
that a free passage of air from the housing into
said conduit may be had. A suitable cotton suc
tion fan (not shown) is located in the other end
of the conduit ii and thus, it will be seen that
said fan will draw an unobstructed stream of air
from the housing into the conduit.
The front wall of the casing or housing extends
forwardly‘and converges toward the central por—
tion of said housing, whereby a reduced cotton
inlet it is provided at the extreme forward end
of the housing. It is pointed out that this inlet
30 ‘r
extends transversely throughout the length of the
housing.’ A suitable transition M is connected
with the inlet i3, and this transition communi
cates with a conductor (not shown) leading to
the wagon or other source of cotton supply. It
is obvious that when the suction means at the
end of the conduit Ii is operating, cotton is
drawn through the transition ill, inlet i3 and into
the housing Ill. The suction means exerts an un
diminished, contiuous pull on the cotton within
the transition ill due to the location of the inlet
i3 centrally of the housing and also due to the
particular disposition of the conduit H, whereby
an even flow of cotton into the housing is had.
The lower end of the housing is provided with
a transverse opening it which extends the full
length thereof and a suitable discharge spout Iii
which has a general circular shape in cross-sec
tion, is connected to the, discharge opening. A
Vacuum paddle wheel ll is rotatably mounted 55..
2,114,553
2
within the discharge spout and is so constructed
as to prevent the escape of air through the dis
charge spout while permitting the discharge of
cotton from the housing iii. The details of the
paddle wheel will be hereinafter described. A
suitable outlet conductor i3 is connected to the
lower end of the spout iii.
For preventing the cotton which is drawn into
the housing iii through the inlet 13 from escaping
through the air conduit l i, and also for directing
such cotton to the discharge spout 55, a curved
metal sheet I8 is located within the housing.
This sheet is suitably secured to supporting mem
bers 19 which are fastened to the rear and upper
15 wall of the housing. The supporting members it
not only hold the sheet 18 in position within the
housing but also serve to space said sheet from
the rear wall thereof, whereby an air space or
passage 2% is provided between said sheet and the
As is clearly shown in
Figure 3, the sheet 18 extends from the upper
end of the inclined front wall of the housing and
curves rearwardly and downwardly in front of
the open end of the air conduit Ii. The sheet is
25 provided with a plurality of perforations or open
ings 2! which extend from its extreme upper end
20 rear wall of the housing.
down to a point at some distance from the lower
end thereof. In other words, the perforations
terminate short of the lower edge of the sheet,
30 whereby a solid baffle 22 is formed by this unper
forated lower end of the sheet. As is clearly
shown in Figure 2, the solid portion or ba?ie 22
of the sheet extends transversely the entire length
of said sheet and is located just above the dis
35 charge opening or outlet [5 of the housing.
As cotton is drawn into the housing through
the transition 14 and inlet i3 by the suction
created in the conduit II, it will be seen that
said cotton will ?rst strike the ?ared front wall
40 of said housing. The wide angle formed by the
converging front wall provides ample space for
expansion of the incoming cotton and immediate
ly a portion of this incoming cotton will drop
downwardly through the discharge opening 15
45 in the housing.
Also, this increased expansion
space prevents the cotton from crowding against
the top of the housing and thereby, prevents any
choking effect at the inlet. The cotton which
does not drop immediately upon its introduction
50 into the housing In will, of course, be drawn with
the air stream against the perforated sheet iii
and will follow the contour of said sheet until it
?nally passes out to the opening 55 into the dis
charge spout !8. The air upon entering the inlet
55 i3 will, of course, immediately rise and pass
through the perforations in the forward end of
the sheet H! which overlies a portion of the ?ared
forward end of the housing.
It is noted that the perforations 2i of the sheet
60 are comparatively large, whereby dirt and other
extraneous matter is drawn through the perfora
tions. Due to the ba?ie 22 at the lower end of the
sheet, it is obvious that the air must follow the
contour of the housing since it cannot pass di
65 rectly in a straight line from the inlet i3 to the
conduit I 1. By directing the air in this manner,
it is obvious that a circulation is set up within
the housing.
For wiping the perforated sheet 88 so as to
70 keep the perforations 2! open, whereby the pas
sage of air therethrough is not interfered with, a
rotatable wheel 23 is located Within the housing
iii. The reel includes a plurality of spiders 24
mounted on a transverse shaft 25 which has its.
75 ends suitably supported in the end walls of the
housing. The shaft is preferably in horizontal
alignment with the inlet opening l3. Each spider
is provided with a plurality of radially extending
arms 26 which have transverse flexible wipers 21
suitably secured thereto. The curvature of the
perforated sheet ii! at its upper end is substan
tially the same as the radius of the arms of the
spiders, whereby when the reel 23 is rotated the
flexible wipers 2'5 will engage the surface of the
sheet to clean the same. It is noted that the con 10
struction of the reel in this manner provides an
open structure, whereby the passage of air
through the housing is not interfered with by the
rotation of the reel. This eliminates an intermit
tent pulsating eifect on the suction because the 15
usual solid paddle wheel is replaced by the open
reel 23. Also, the open structure does not inter
fere with the falling cotton within the housing.
It is further pointed out that the curvature of the
perforated sheet i8 is such that the entire portion 20
of said sheet is wiped or cleaned by the reel and
thus, since the screen is kept clean, the suction
is stronger because there is less tendency of the
screen to clog.
From the above, it will be seen that the cotton 25
is drawn into the housing through the inlet l3
and immediately enters the ?ared front portion
of said housing wherein it is permitted to expand.
Due to the inlet being located centrally of the
?ared front portion, it is obvious that the air will 30
immediately rise in the housing while the cotton
will drop down. The rising air will, of course,
pass through the perforated screen and then fol
low the curvature of the housing, passing out
wardly through the conduit I i. All dust and dirt 35
of a ?ne nature will pass with the air through
the perforations in the sheet and will thus be
separated from. the cotton. The cotton upon en
tering will, of course, immediately expand and
then fall into the discharge spout It. The ex 40
pansion of the cotton will cause the cotton to be
separated whereby any solid wads which may
have been formed in the cotton previous to its
inlet, are broken up. Thus, the cotton is opened
up and the locks separated to a great extent, 45
whereby the cotton is in a good condition to be
handled through the distributor or cleaning ma
chinery (not shown) to which it is carried after
it leaves the housing. The open reel not only
offers no obstruction to the falling cotton but also 50
permits air to freely ?ow therethrough and thus
does. not interrupt the suction necessary for
drawing the cotton into the housing.
As the air is separated from the cotton, said
cotton will drop downwardly through the outlet 55
opening 55 in the bottom. of the housing and will
fall into the discharge spout 18. Upon entering
the spout N3, the paddle wheel i'i therein will
carry the cotton downwardly and discharge it
into the outlet conductor 58. The paddle wheel 60
I’! may be of any desired construction but it is
preferably made of a plurality of supporting spi
ders 30 which are secured on a transverse shaft
3| extending the full length of the discharge
spout iii. The spiders are provided with radial 65
arms 3! and the space between the spiders is
closed by a transverse substantially V-shaped
partition 32 which is located between the arms
of the spider (Figure 6). These partitions are
suitably bolted in place by retaining members
33 which follow the contour of said partitions and
the spider arms. As is clearly shown in Figure 6,
the outer edges of the partitions 32 extend be
yond the end of the arms 3i of the spiders and
?exible wipers 3A are secured or clamped between 75
2,114,552“.
these .extended outer edges ‘of the partitions. It
is obvious that - as the paddlewheel thus formed»
rotates within‘. the dischargespout ltthe ?exible
wipers.34:willcontactitheinner surface of the
. discharge spout and will. thus prevent the .escape
cleaning machinery. A..hinged panel 10' may be,
providedinthe front wall'of the housing l0 so that 1
the interiorof the housingmay be. readilyi.a'c—i
cessible.- It is .noted that the. wiper Zluon-the
reel as well as .thewiper
on-thepaddle-wheel: 5 Q1.
ll zmaybe readily replaced without removingthe
of. any air through‘ said spout. At the sametime
the cotton droppingfrom the housing I 0 willdrop
upon the. substantially V-shaped. partition. 32 lo
reel =23 or. wheelfrom the device.
What I claim, and desire to secureby Letters
cated between the spider. arms 3| and will thus
Patent, is :.
1 0.. be
carried around. bythe rotating wheel and dis
chargedinto the outlet conductor 18.
Although thereel 23 in thehousing .I 0 and the
reel l'lzwithin. the discharge spout Iii may-rotate
at. any desired speed, it is preferable that the reel
1 5 .rotateat a comparatively slow speed ‘while the
paddle. wheel .H-whichi has .a much.‘ smaller di—
ameter rotates at a greater speed. For transmit- .
1.: Acotton separator. including, a housing hav
ing an outwardly extending convergent wall and
havingv an- inlet opening inv its reduced end, a
suction conduit connected. in its oppositewall for.
drawing thelcottonyinto the housing through. the
inlet opening, a screen within the housing. open:
to saidinlet for separating the cotton from-the.
air stream, said-screen having a portion. thereof '
ting. motion to the reel 23 andthe paddle .wheel ‘ extendingfrorn. and underlying the convergent.
l1, theshaft- 25 of said-reel has .one end extended wall of the housing, means within the screen for
outwardly throughitheend wall of the housing ill cleaning the entire surface of ‘the screen, and a
2
(Figure 1). The extremeiouter end of this shaft
carries anv enlarged‘ gear 35 and this gear is con
nected through a chain 36 with a small gear 31
which ismounted on‘ the extended end of the
25
.shaftw3l sof the .paddle wheel. A motor, or ‘any
other suitable ‘means, maybe connected to either‘
oneof the shafts to. rotate thesame, but I have
shown. a drive wheel ‘38nmounted on the paddle
wheel shaft 3!. A belt is arranged to. pass over
3 0 .this drive wheel to impart rotation to said shaft.
It isclear ‘that when thepaddle wheel I1 is ro
tated at a given speed, the reel 23 will be rotated
at a much slower speed due to the connection be
tween the small and large gears 31 and 35 respec
tively, by the chain 36.
The operation of the device is obvious.
The
suction means (not shown) at the end of the con
duit II will draw the cotton from the transition
l4 into the housing In through the reduced inlet
Upon entering the housing the cotton is
permitted to expand due to the wide angle of
the front portion of the housing. The air will
immediately tend to rise within said housing
while the cotton will drop toward the discharge
4 5 spout IS. The open reel 23 will not interfere
with the falling cotton or with the air stream
4 0 I3.
whereby an undiminished continuous pull on the
cotton is had. The air will, of course, escape
through the perforations in the sheet I8 and will
carry any ?ne dust or dirt therewith.
As the
cotton falls toward the discharge opening l5 it
will be seen that it will fall opposite the ba?‘le 22
formed by the unperforated section of the sheet
18. This ba?le causes the air to pass upwardly
therearound into the conduit H and thus creates
a dead air space at a point just above the dis—
charge opening W. The revolving vacuum pad
dle wheel ll removes the cotton out of the air
below the sheet. The structure of the paddle
60 wheel prevents any escape of air through the dis
charge and thus only cotton alone is carried to»
the outlet conductor l8. Due to the wide in
ternal angle adjacent the inlet l3, it is practically
impossible to feed sufficient cotton through a
6 5 standard telescope to choke the separator down
by overfeeding the suction. It is obvious that
the vacuum feeder can be speeded up to suit
the particular installation. It is again noted that
this type of cleaner is a great improvement in the
70 preparation of the cotton for ginning. Instead of
being dropped in solid wads as tramped in the cot
ton wagon, or other source of supply, the cotton is
opened up and the locks separated to a much’
greater expanse, so that the cotton is in good con
5 dition to be handled through the distributor or
discharge in theb-ott-om cfr-the,housingwforthe
cotton therein.
2. A cotton separator including, a housing have .
ing-an outwardly extending convergent wall and:
having an‘ inlet opening in its reduced end, a suc ‘253..
tion conduit connected in‘ its opposite wall for
drawing the cotton into the housing through. the
inlet opening, ascreen-within the housing for.-v
separating thecotton from. the air stream, said.
screen having a- portion thereof within the con.-...
vergent wall» of the housing,‘ an open structure
reel within the housing for cleaning the entire
surface of the screen without interrupting the
air stream therethrough and without interfering
with the cotton, and means for discharging the 35
cotton from the housing separately of the air.
3. A cotton separator including; a housing
having an outwardly extending convergent wall
and having an inlet opening in its reduced end,
a suction conduit connected in its opposite wall 40
for drawing the cotton into the housing through
the inlet opening, a coarse curved screen within
the housing for separating the cotton from the
air and ?ne dust, said screen having a portion
thereof within the convergent wall of the hous 45
ing, and means for discharging the cotton from
the housing separately of the air.
4. A cotton separator including, a housing
having an outwardly extending convergent wall
and having an inlet opening in its reduced end,
a suction conduit connected in its opposite wall
for drawing the cotton into the housing through
the inlet opening, a coarse curved screen extend
ing from and underlying the convergent wall of
the housing for separating the cotton from the 55
air and ?ne dust, said screen having a portion
thereof within the convergent wall of the hous
ing, a rotatable open structure reel within the
screen for cleaning the entire surface of the
screen, and means for discharging the cotton
from the housing separately of the air.
5. A cotton separator‘ including, a housing
having a divergent inlet, a stationary arcuate
screen extending from the divergent top wall
of the housing to the bottom of said housing and 65
dividing the housing into a cleaning chamber ‘
and an air chamber, and a revolving cleaner
operating on the inner surface of the screen for
wiping the same.
6. A cotton separator including, a housing
having a divergent inlet, a stationary arcuate
screen extending from the divergent top wall '
of the housing to the bottom of said housing
and dividing the housing into a cleaning cham
ber and an air chamber, a revolving cleaner 75
4
2,114,553
operating on the inner surface of the screen for
wiping the same, and means at the lower end
cleaning the screen, whereby the entire surface
of the cleaning chamber of the housing for re
ceiving cotton therefrom and for discharging
unobstructive to the passage of air therethrough,
said cotton separately from the air.
'7. A cotton separator including, a housing
having a cotton inlet at approximately mid
height of one side wall thereof, a suction conduit
connected to the opposite wall of said housing
10 for drawing cotton into» the housing and across
the same through the said inlet, a stationary
upright screen mounted within the housing be
tween the inlet and the conduit for arresting
the passage of the cotton and separating the
15 same from the air stream, and a revolving wiper
within the housing between the inlet and the
screen constantly wiping the entire inner surface
of said screen to maintain said screen surface
free of the accumulation of cotton and to pro
20 duce an unobstructed passage for the air.
8. A cotton separator including, a housing
having an inwardly flared cotton inlet along one
side, a suction conduit connected in the opposite
side of the housing below said inlet for draw
25 ing cotton into said housing through said inlet
and across said housing, an upright stationary
screen within the housing between the inlet and
the conduit thereof and open to said inlet and
receiving cotton therefrom for separating the
of the screen is maintained free of cotton and
a discharge spout for the cotton below the screen,
said screen and the inlet side of the housing
discharging into said spout, and means within
the spout for discharging cotton received from
the screen and housing without permitting the
escape of air from the housing.
9. A cotton separator including, a housing
having an inwardly ?ared cotton inlet at one
side, a suction conduit connected in the opposite
side of the housing for drawing cotton from the
inlet across said housing, an upright stationary
screen within the housing between the inlet and 15
suction conduit and open to said inlet for receiv
ing cotton therefrom and separating the latter
from the air stream, a cleaning reel within the
housing between the screen and the inlet for
cleaning the screen without interrupting the air H
stream, whereby the entire surface of the screen
is maintained free of cotton and unobstructive
to the passage of air therethrough, a discharge
spout connected with the screen and the inlet
side of the housing, whereby cotton flowing down
the stream is discharged into the spout, and
means within the spout for discharging the cot
ton therefrom without permitting the escape of
air from the housing.
30 latter from the air stream, means within the
housing between the screen and the inlet for
30
BRONSON C. WOODFORD.
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