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Патент USA US2114594

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April 19, 193s. >
2,114,594:l l
l. ELLIOTT
HUMIDIFIER
Filed April 5. 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
r- »/
ATT
EYS .
2,114,594@
Patented Apr. 19, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE
2,114,594
HUDIIDIFIER
Irwin Elliott, Harmon, N. Y.
Application April 3, 1936, Serial No. 72,497
7 Claims.
’I'his invention relates to a novel and improved
form of humidifier, the novel features of which
will be best understood from the following de
scription and the annexed drawings, in which I
have shown selected embodiments of the inven
tion and in which:
Figs. 1, 2, and 3 are vertical sections through
one embodiment of the invention showing the
parts in diiîerent positions which they may take
during the operation of the- device;
Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view through an
other embodiment of the invention.
Referring ñrst to Figs. 1, 2, and 3, I have
shown therein a vertically extending casing I,
which may be in the form of a cylinder or any
other suitable shape.
It is shown as divided by
a horizontal partition 2 into a motor chamber 3
and a reservoir 4, in the latter of which liquid,
such as water, may be placed. The normal water
0 level of the liquid is indicated at 5.
I provide means for forming an air chamber
above the reservoir and, in the illustrated em
bodiment, this chamber is formed by a hood 6
having vertically extending walls ‘I which extend
down into the liquid. This hood is shown as
having its top secured to a rod 3 which is ver
tically movable in a bearing 9 mounted upon the
partition 2. Reciprocation of. the rod may be
caused by a crank arm I0 rotated by a motor II
and having a roller I2 which is received within a
slot I3 in a yoke I4. The extreme lower position
of the hood is indicated in Fig. 1 and at inter
mediate position in Fig. 2, while in Fig. 3 the
hood is shown at substantially its uppermost
35 position but after it has started its downward
movement.
Extending into the chamber above the water
line is an inlet pipe I5 communicating with the
atmosphere or with any other source of air, and
40 the end of this pipe is provided with a one-Way
valve I6 adapted to admit air into the chamber
but prevent its reverse flo-w'from the chamber
into the inlet. The chamber is provided with
an outlet I'I having a valve I 8, and here shown
as located in the top of the hood and which is
also a one-way valve, permitting discharge of the
air from the chamber but preventing reverse flow
into the chamber.
Disposed adjacent the outlet I'I is a nozzle
_I9 adapted to atomize any liquid passing there
through and connected to a tube 20 extending
downwardly below the water level 5 at all posi
tions of the hood. This tube is slidably engaged
with a second tube 2I mounted in brackets 22
5.5 secured on the bearing 9 and having a bottom
(Cl. 261-28)
provided with a hole 23. Disposed in the lower
end of the tube is a ball check valve 24.
TheI reservoir may be provided at its top with
an outlet 25 associated with which there may be
employed a suitable bañ‘le 26. The reservoir may 5
likewise be provided with a well-known water
gauge 2l and also with connections 28 and 29
which may be used for circulating water con
tinually through the reservoir.
Within the hood and in. the path of air be
tween the inlet pipe and the outlet I'I I provide
one or more screens 30.
For convenience, these
may extend vertically, as indicated, and prefer
ably each screen extends below the water line 5.
In operation, and assuming that the parts are
in the position shown in Fig. 1, it will be seen
that both Valves I6 and I8 are closed. As the
crank operates, the hood will rise and then an
action will take place, such as that indicated in
Fig. 2. Since the hood walls are sealed by the '2O
liquid in the reservoir, the upward movement of
the hood will suck air into the inlet pipe I5 and,
of course, the valve I6 will be opened by the pres
sure of the air in the pipe I5, whereas the valve
I3 will be maintained closed. At the same time, 25
the tube 20 will be moved upwardly in the tube
2i and create enough of a vacuum in the tube 2l
so that the check valve 24 will be lifted to admit
some liquidto the lower end of the tube 2i.
Then, as the hood starts its downward path,
as indicated in Fig. 3, the valve I6 will immedi
ately be closed and the valve I8 will be opened
by the pressure of the air in the hood. At the
same time, the downward movement of the tube
2i) will cause closing of the hole 23 by the check
valve 24, and the liquid in the tube 2| will be
pushed out through the atomizer nozzle I9 in
the form of a spray, as indicated in Fig. 3.
This ’
spray is in the path of the air discharged through
40
the outlet I'I.
The screens 30 are initially wet, as will be seen
from Fig. 1, and the air discharged from the
outlet I1 is air which has passed through the wet
screens, thereby being cleaned. These screens
are preferably made of woven fabric or of any 45
other suitable material, and they will carry a
lm of water which serves to collect foreign
matter from the air as it passes through the
screens.
Continuous rotation of the crank will of course 50
result in the repetition of the above sequence of
operations.
It will be seen that the result of these opera
tions is the admission of a charge of air to the
chamber formed between the hood and the Water
2
2,114,594
or other liquid in the reservoir.
Thisy charge of
through the screens, and then it is provided
draws Water from the bottom of the reservoir
and discharges it through the nozzle 48.
Within the duct 32 is disposed a source of heat,
with additional moisture as it is discharged
here indicated as a conduit 49, through which hot
through the outlet as it passes through the spray
gases and the like may pass from the oil burner
from the nozzle i9.
The apparatus is an improvement over ar
50, on their way to the ñue 5I which communi
Cates with a chimney. The conduit 49 may be
provided with fins, as indicated, to aid in impart
ing heat to the air in the duct 32.
By the above described arrangement, the air
is reconditioned by passing over the fins and the
walls of the conduit 49, and then by being cleaned
by passageY through the screens in the chamber
under the hood 34, and finally it is humidiñed by
passing through the spray from the` nozzle 48 15
air is cleaned and wet to some extent by pas
rangements by which air is forced continuously,
as by a blower, through a spray or “rain’ï of liq
10 uid. The use of blowers in humidifying air is not
altogether satisfactory.
The Vair handled by
blowers is at low pressure and in large volume,
and the operation is a continuous one. I have
noticed that the humidiñcation of the air blown
15 through a “rain” of water with the ordinary
blowers is every apt to be incomplete. The air
appears to be moved through the “rain” in such
large volume that the “rain” does not humidify
and clean it properly. Whether this is because of
20 the large volume or because of some other reason,
I am not certain, but I found that by periodically
cleaning a charge of air of predetermined
amount, as in the above-described apparatus,
and then discharging that cleaned air under
25 positive pressure into the atmosphere, much bet
ter results are obtained. The operation may beV
repeated as rapidly or as slowly as conditions re
quire.
For example, a device constructed simi
larly to that shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 3, has been
30 operated successfully at the rate of twenty com
By the use of my invention in such a system 20
as shown in Fig. 4, several advantages are gained.
By avoiding the use of centrifugal blowers or the
like, and by passing charges of air into the sys
tem at a relatively high pressure, it is possible
to more easily direct the conditioned air to the
place to which it is desired to send it. Smaller
pipes may be ‘used in the system, and the flow of
air in those pipes will be more easily controlled
by dampers or other valves than when larger
pipes with relatively large volume of low-pres
plete operations per minute, by which twenty
sure air are used.
charges of air are properly treated and discharged
into the atmosphere during each minute of
The atomizer nozzle 48 may be controlled by
any suitable automatic control, such as usually
identified by the term “humidistat”, Such con
trols kare Well known in the art, and a detailed
description thereof is not deemed necessary.
operation.
35
on its way tothe pipes 52 of the air circulation
system. These pipes may be provided with
dampers 53 so that the amount of air passing
through any one pipe may be readily controlled.
,
The primary function of the screens 30 is to
clean the air, although, of course, the air will be
humidi?ied to some extent by passing through
the chamber formed between the hood and the
liquid. It can still be further humidiñed by pass
40 ing through the spray from the nozzle I9, which
spray is relied upon for the principal humidi
ñcation.
In Fig. 4 I have shown how the invention may
be applied to a complete air conditioning sys
45 tem. Here the conditioned air is received from
the air circulation system at 3| and then passes
through a duct 32 to an inlet pipe 33 from which
it is discharged beneath the hood 34 and above
the water level 35 beneath the hood. This hood
50 is pivoted at 36 and may be vertically recipro
cated about that pivot from the motor 31 having
a crank 38 connected by a link 39, and an arm 40
fast on a rock shaft 4l to which is secured a sec
ond arm 42 pivoted to a link 43 at one end there
55 of. The other end of the link 43is pivoted to the
top of the hood, and thus the hood may be rocked
between the lower position shown in dotted lines
and the upper position shown in dot and dash
lines. It is shown in full lines in section and in
60 intermediate position.
The top of the hood is provided with an outlet
44 closed by a one-way valve 45, and the inlet pipe
33 is likewise provided with a one-way valve 46.
These valves operate in the same manner as the
65 valves IG and i8 in the embodiment previously
described, and their detailed operation will not
be described again. The air passes between the
inlet pipe and the outlet through screens 41 which
are wet and which perform the same function in
Ithe same way as the screens 30 of the other em
bodiment.
An atomizer could be used with the
hood 34 in the same manner as with the hood 6,
but I have shown a slightly different arrangement
in this form. Here the spray is provided from an
atomizing nozzle 43 by a pump unit 49 which
30
While I have shown the invention as em
bodied in speciiic forms, it is to be understood that
various changes in details may be made without
departing from the scope of the invention, as 40
deñned by the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A humidifier comprising a reservoir for
liquid, means forming a chamber above said
liquid in the reservoir, an inlet adapted to admit 45
air into said chamber and an outlet adapted to
discharge air therefrom, one-way valves prevent
ing reverse flow of air through said inlet and
outlet, means for causing periodic opening and
closing of said valves to admit air to said cham 50
ber and later to discharge it therefrom, one or
more screens disposed in said chamber in the
path of air passing therethrough, and means for
maintaining said screens wet.V
2. A humidifier
'
comprising , a >reservoir
for 55
liquid, means forming a chamber above said
liquid in the reservoir, an inlet adapted to admit
air into said chamber and an outlet adapted to
discharge air therefrom, one-Way valves prevent
ing reverse flow of air through said inlet and 60
outlet, means for causing periodic opening and
closing of said valves to admit air to said cham
ber and later to discharge it therefrom, means
forming a spray of liquid in the path of the air
thus discharged at said outlet, one or more 65
screens disposed in said chamber in the path of
air passing therethrough, and means for main
taining said screens wet.
3. A humidifier comprising a reservoir for
liquid, a hood disposed above the liquid in said
reservoir and having vertically disposed walls ex
tending downwardly into said liquid, means to
reciprocate said hood vertically, a one-way out
let valve in said hood adapted to be opened to
discharge air by the pressure within the hood
2,114,594
3
when the hood is moved downwardly, an inlet
pipe adapted to discharge air into the hood, a
one-way valve in said inlet pipe adapted to be
opened to admit air by the decrease in pressure
within the hood when the hood is moved upward
ly, and one or more screens within the hood in
passing between the inlet and the outlet and in
position to be wet by the liquid during said rc»
ciprocation of the hood, means forming a spray
of liquid in the path of the air thus discharged
the path of air passing between the inlet and
heated by said source of heat and communi
eating with said inlet pipe.
the outlet and in position to be wet by the liquid
during said reciprocation of the hood.
4. A humidifier comprising a reservoir for
10
liquid, a hood disposed above the liquid in said
reservoir and having vertically disposed walls ex
tending downwardly into said liquid, means to
reciprocate said hood vertically, a one-way outlet valve in said hood adapted to be opened to
discharge air by the pressure within the hood
when the hood is moved downwardly, an inlet
pipe adapted to discharge air into the hood, a
one-way valve in said inlet. pipe adapted to be
opened to admit air by the decrease .in pressure
within the hood when the hood is moved up~
wardly, one or more screens within the hood in
the path of air passing between the inlet and the
outlet and in position to be wet by the liquid
during said reciprocation of the hood, and means
forming a spray of liquid in the path of the air
thus discharged at said outlet.
5. A humidiñer comprising a reservoir for
liquid, a hood disposed above the liquid in said
reservoir and having vertically disposed walls
extending downwardly into said liquid, means to
reciprocate said hood vertically, a one-way outlet
valve in said hood adapted to be opened to dis
charge air by the pressure within the hood when
the hood is moved downwardly, an inlet pipe
adapted to discharge air into the hood, a one-way
valve in said inlet pipe adapted to be opened to
admit air by the decrease in pressure within the
hood when the hood is moved upwardly, one or
more screens within the hood in the path of air
at said outlet, a source of heat disposed beneath
said reservoir, and an air duct arranged to be
6. A humidiñer comprising a reservoir for
liquid, a hood disposed above the liquid in said 10
reservoir and having vertically disposed walls ex
tending downwardly into said liquid, means to
reciprocate said hood vertically, an inlet pipe
adapted to discharge air into the upper part of
the hood above the normal liquid level therein,
a one-way valve in said inlet pipe adapted to be
opened to admit air to the hood by the decrease
in pressure within the hood when the hood is
moved upwardly, and a one-way outlet valve in
the top of said hood adaptedto be opened to dis 20
charge air from the hood by the pressure within
the hood when the hood is moved downwardly.
'7. A humidifier comprising a reservoir for
liquid, a hood disposed above the liquid in said
reservoir and having vertically disposed Walls ex 25
tending downwardly into said liquid, means to
reciprocate said hood vertically, an inlet pipe
adapted to discharge air into the upper vpart of
the hood above the normal liquid level therein,
a one-way valve in said inlet pipe adapted to be
opened to admit air to the hood by the decrease
in pressure within the hood when the hood is
moved upwardly, a one-way outlet valve in the
top of said hood adapted to be opened to dis
charge air from the hood by the pressure within 35
the hood when the hood is moved downwardly,
and means forming a spray of liquid in the path
of the air thus discharged from the outlet valve.
IRWIN ELLIOTT.
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