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Патент USA US2114597

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April 19, 1938-.
F. M. GODDARD
KEY CUTTING MACHINE
Filed March 19, 1957
' 2,114,597
2,114,597
Patented Apr. 19, 1938
umrso STATES
smear GFFlQE
2,114,597
KEY CUTTING MACHINE
Francis vlVI. Goddard, Denver, Colo.
Application March 19, 1937, Serial No. 131,831
'7 Claims. (Cl. Elli-13.05)
This invention relates to a key cutting machine
and has for its principal object the provision of
a simple accurate, highly efficient, mechanism
which can be used either for duplicating keys or
for cutting a key from its code number where
the duplicate is not available.
Another object of the invention is to provide
a code setting device which will be absolutely
accurate as to both position and depth; which
will be substantially automatic in’ operation;
which will not depend upon the skill of the
‘operator; and which will be simple to use and
"fool proof” in operation.
Other objects and advantages reside in the de
tail construction of the invention, which is de
signed for simplicity, economy, and e?iciency.
These will become more apparent from the fol
lowing description.
In the following detailed description of the in
vention reference is had to the accompanying
drawing which forms a part hereof. Like
numerals refer to like parts in all views of the
drawing and throughout the description.
In the drawing:-—
7
i
'
Fig. 1 is a perspective view illustrating the
complete key cutting machine with the preferred
form of code setting device in place thereon.
Figs. 2 to 8 inclusive illustrate alternate forms
of code setting devices which can be employed
with the machine of Fig. 1. These will be more
fully described in the following ‘speci?cation.
The machine comprises: a main frame It pro
vided at its bottom with a table or bench clamp
l i by means of which the frame may be attached
to any suitable supporting surface. The frame
supports a relatively long, shaft bearing 12 in
which a cutter shaft I3 is journalled. The cutter
shaft i3 terminates at one extremity in a key
milling cutter Hi and at its other extremity in a
hand crank 15.
The frame it also provides a second hearing it
positioned parallel to the ?rst bearing I2. The
second bearing acts as a journal for a key clamp
shaft H which is both rotatably and slidably
mounted in the bearing it. One extremity of the
shaft I1 carries a clamp frame I8 designed to
carry a pattern clamp Iii and a duplicate clamp
20. The clamps i8 and 25! are similar to each
other and each is provided with a clamp screw
it for clamping a ?xed plate against the frame
is: O
it to clamp a key therebetween.
'
The clamp I9 is designed for holding the key to
be duplicated and the clamp 2|] is designed for
holding a key blank.
A pointed follower 22 is supported upon a fol
lower arm 23 on the frame I0 so that its point is v ’
positioned at a point opposite the key clamp l9
corresponding to the position of the edge of the
key cutter it! relative to the clamp 20.
The key clamp I9 is formed with a handle
preferably of the “pistol grip” type, as shown at
21% to facilitate the guiding of the frame It.
-It can be readily seen that if a key is placed
in the clamp 59 and a key blank is placed in
the clamp 20 the cutter it will mill a pattern 10
from the blank corresponding to the pattern of
the key sample. The movement of the frame
28 toward and along the cutter is directed by
the contour of the key in the clamp i 9 as it moves
against the follower 22.
‘
As thus far described the device forms an ideal
key duplicating machine. It is . also designed,
however, for the manufacture of keys, where the
original keys‘are not available, from the original
key code number.
20
One means for accomplishing this is to mount
a code setting disc 25 on a suitable pivot shaft
25 projecting from the frame Ill.
The disc>25
rotates in a plane parallel to the axis of the cutter
shaft H, and is provided with a series of sockets 25
21 of predetermined depths and predetermined
spacing.
The sockets 21 are preferably arranged on
radial lines from the pivot shaft fit so as to form
a plurality of series of sockets, four being shown 30
in the drawing. Each series is numbered as indi
cated by 28. The depth of the sockets in the
different series of sockets varies, but the sockets
of each series are of uniform depth.
For instance, the sockets in series “1” are ‘com
paratlvely shallow whereas those in series “2”,
“' ’ and “ll” successively increase in depth, the
deepest sockets being in series “4”. The sockets
in each series are spaced from each other to
correspond to the spacing of the tumbler notches 40
on the key to be cut.
’
A gauge pin 29, supported by an arm 3% from
the key clamp 20, is positioned so that it can be
swung into any desired socket of a series by
proper movement of the frame i8.
'
Let us assume that it is desired to cut a key in
which the ?rst groove will have a depth of “1",
the second groove a depth of “3”, the third a
depth of “Li” and the fourth a depth of “2”. The
disc 25 is turned to bring series “1” opposite ,
the pin 29, the frame IB is slid to the right so that
the pin 29 is positioned opposite the ?rst socket
of the series, as shown in Fig. 1. The handle 24
is now lifted bringing the key blank into engage
ment with the cutter. The depth of the notch 55
'2
2,114,597
cut will be limited by the contact of the pin 29
with the bottom of its socket. The key is now
swung away from the cutter, the disc 25 is ro
tated to bring series “3” opposite the pin 29,
the frame !8 is moved to the left so that the pin
will enter the second socket of series “3” allowing
the second key notch to be cut corresponding to
the depth of the socket in series “3”. This
process is repeated with series “4” and “2”, the
10 pin 29 being successively moved to the left to
engage the sockets of each series of sockets.
It can be readily seen that the key produced
will be accurately controlled both as to depth and
spacing of the notches by the depth and spacing
15 of the various sockets 21.
The basic principle of this machine is the use
of a gage member, such as the pin 29, in combi
nation with a pattern blank having receptive de
pressions of predetermined depth and spacing,
to guide a cutter.
While the preferred means for
accomplishing this is the rotary code disc 25 with
its radial series of sockets, it can be accomplished
in many ways.
by an index 46. It can be readily seen that the
cylinder can be rotated to present any desired
depth of groove and that the spacing of the
grooves from each other will determine the key
notch spacing. At the right of Fig. 5, the same
principle is applied, but in this case the bottoms of
the grooves present a square outline in cross sec
tion as indicated at 41, so that four different po
sitions of rotation will present four different
groove depths.
An additional form is shown in Fig. 6, in which
laterally extending, parallel grooves of uniform
depth are out about a cylindrical code setting
member 189. Longitudinal grooves 50 cross the
parallel grooves. The longitudinal grooves are 15
of different depths. The lateral grooves deter
mine the depth of notch cutting and the par
allel grooves determine the spacing of the notches.
While the various code setting devices have been
described as being designed to receive a gauge
member such as the pin 29, they could in some
instances receive the key blank itself in their
grooves so as to change the relative positions of
Another method is illustrated in Fig. 2, wherein
25 the disc 25 is displaced by a. pattern plate 3|
having a series of vertical columns of sockets 32.
The columns are spaced-apart to correspond with
the key notch spacing and the sockets increase in
depth as the bottom of each column is approached.
The plate 3! is vertically movable in a supporting
slide 33 so that vertical movement thereof will
bring the socket of the desired depth opposite the
gage pin 29 and horizontal movement of the key
supporting frame 98 will bring the pin opposite
key and cutter by direct engagement of key and
code setting device. For instance, in the form
shown in Fig. 6, the key could be placed in the
various depth grooves 55 with its back toward the
bottom of the groove.
The shallow grooves would
then act to project the key further towards the
cutter than the deep grooves.
30
While a speci?c form of the improvement has
7 been described and illustrated herein, it is desired
to be understood that the same may be varied,
within the scope of the appended claims, without
departing from the spirit of the invention.
In Fig. 3 still another form of gage plate is
Having thus described the invention, what is
illustrated, provided with vertical grooves 34 and , claimed and desired secured by Letters Patent
35 the desired column of sockets.
horizontal grooves 35. The vertical grooves give
the proper key notch spacing and the horizontal
40 grooves give the proper notch ‘depths. The
grooves are engaged at their intersections by an
L-shaped gage member 36 which corresponds in
function to the gage pin 25?.
Fig. 4 is a face view and cross-sectional view
45 illustrating the socket form of Fig. 1 applied to
a cylinder instead of a disc. In this form the
code setting device consists of a rotatable cylin
drical member 31, provided with a plurality of
series of depth sockets 38 radially entering the
cylindrical member 3'5’.
The same results are ob
tained with this form as by rotating the disc 25
of the preferred form of Fig. 1.
Fig. '7 illustrates the groove form of Fig. 3 ap
plied to a circular rotatable disc. The various
depth grooves are out radiallyas shown at 39
and the spacing grooves are cut concentrically as
shown at 40.
Another form of rotating code setting device
is illustrated in Fig. 8, in which grooves 55 are
60 cut in radial arms 4| which are free to rotate
about a central shaft 452. The grooves in each
arm are of the same depth and the grooves in
adjacent arms increase successively in depth so
that by swinging the arms to position beneath
the gage pin the depth may be varied. The spac
ing of the notches in. the ?nal key is determined
by the spacing of the grooves in the arms M.
Fig. 5 is a side elevation and cross section of
still another alternate form in which grooves d3
70 are cut parallel to each other about a rotatable
cylinder 44. The bottom of each groove varies in
depth so that a section through the bottom of a
groove as taken on the line CD and presents a
cam contour, as indicated at £5. The amount
75 of rotation of the cylinder Ml can be determined
Ct
15:
1. A key cutting device comprising: a support
ing member; a rotary cutter carried by said sup
40
porting member; a laterally and longitudinally
movable key clamp journalled in said supporting
member; a gage member having plurality of
spaced-apart depressed surfaces in said gage
member; a gage pin projecting from said key
clamp positioned to contact any desired one of
said depressed surfaces, the spacing of said sur
faces corresponding to given key notch spacings
and the depth of depression of said surfaces cor~
responding to given key notch depths so that a
single gage member will cooperate with a single
gage pin to limit both the longitudinal and lateral
movement of said key clamp.
2. A key cutting device comprising: a support
ing member; a rotary cutter carried by said sup~
porting member; a key clamp slidably journalled
in said supporting member so that it may be
moved either laterally to and from said cutter or
longitudinally parallel to the axis of said cutter;
an arm extending from said key clamp; a locating (iii
pin extending from said arm; and a rotary disc
carried by said frame opposite said pin, there be~
ing a plurality of series of sockets in said disc po
sitioned so that when said disc is rotated any de—
sired series of sockets may be brought opposite
said pin, the sockets in each set being of uniform
depth and the sockets of adjacent series being of
different depths.
3. A key cutting device comprising: a support~
ing frame; a cutter shaft journalled in said frame; 70
a rotary cutting disc carried on said shaft; a key
clamp member; a key clamp shaft supporting said
key clamp member, said shaft being parallel to
said cutter shaft and. both rotatably and slidably
mounted in said frame, so that said key clamp 75
2,114,597
may be swung laterally to and from said cutter
and longitudinally across said cutter; a rotary
disc supported by said frame so as to rotate in
a plane parallel to the axis of said cutter shaft,
said disc having a plurality of radial series of
sockets; and a gage member carried by said key
clamp and engaging said sockets to limit the
lateral and longitudinal movement of said key
clamp.
10
4. A key cutting device comprising: a support
ing frame;v a cutter shaft journalled in said frame;
a rotary cutting disc carried on said shaft; a key
clamp member; a key clamp shaft supporting said
key clamp member, said shaft being parallel to
15 said cutter shaft and both rotatably and slidably
mounted in said frame, so that said key clamp
may be swung laterally to and from said cutter
and longitudinally across said cutter; a rotary
disc supported by said frame so as to rotate in a
20 plane parallel to the axis of said cutter shaft, said
disc having a plurality of radial series of sockets;
and a gage member carried by said key clamp
and engaging said sockets to limit the lateral
and longitudinal movement of said key clamp,
25 each series of sockets being of different depths
while the sockets in any one series are of uniform
depth.
5. A code setting device for key cutting ma
chines comprising a gauge member having a plu
30 rality of spaced apart series of depressions in its
face, the depressions in each series being of uni
3
form predetermined depth and differing in depth
from the depressions in each of the other series;
and a gauge member mounted to selectively en
ter said depressions.
6. A unit indexing member, to cooperate with
a gage member to locate a tool in relation to the
work in any of a series of predetermined posi
tions, having uniformly spaced rows of recesses in
its face, to individually receive said gage member,
the recesses in each row being of a uniform depth 10
which differs from the depth of the recesses in
adjacent rows.
7. A key cutting device comprising: a support
ing member; a rotary cutter carried by said sup
porting member; a key clamp slidably journalled 15
in said supporting member so that it may be
moved either laterally to and from said cutter or
longitudinally parallel to the axis of said cutter;
a rotary code setting member carried by said
frame; a plurality of rows of spaced sockets 20
formed in said code setting member; the sockets
in each row being of the same depth, the depth in
each row differing from the remaining rows;
a locating member ?xedly mounted on said key
clamp; and means for moving both said key clamp 25
and said code setting member so that said locat
ing member may be brought into contact with
the bottom of any socket of any desired row to
simultaneously determine both the spacing and
30
the depth of the desired key notch.
FRANCIS M. GODDARD.
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