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Патент USA US2114638

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April 19, 1938.
J. H. s. PARKER -
2,114,638
LIGHT SEAL
Filed Feb. 1'7, 1937
J. Henry S. Parker
IN V E NTOR.
M)» M
@4175‘
ATTORNEYS
2,114,638
Patented Apr. 19, 1938
UNITED STATES FATENT OFFICE
2,114,638
LIGHT SEAL
J. Henry S. Parker, Rochester, N. Y., assignor to
Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N. Y., a
corporation of New Jersey
Application February 17, 1937, Serial No. 126,243
4 Claims.
' (Cl. 95-67)
This invention relates to photography and par~
ticularly to light seals for holders for light-sensi
tive photographic material.
One of the objects of my invention is to provide
5 a light seal of fabric which is rugged in con
struction and which is effective in preventing
light rays from passing to sensitive material held
by the holder. Another object of my invention is
to provide a light seal of relatively coarse and
10 strong material which is arranged in a plurality
of rows of tufts, these tufts being so positioned
that light passing through certain of the tufts
will be blocked by other tufts of the material.
Another object of my invention is to provide a
16 light lock including at least one strip of tufted
fabric, the rows of tufts being arranged in par
allel and staggered relation. Still another object
of my invention is to provide a fabric light lock
which is not too resistant to material passing
2
o
.
through the light lock opening.
A still further
object of my invention is to provide a suitable
light lock for plate holders, ?lm packs or the
like.
Coming now to the drawing, wherein like ref
25 erence characters denote like parts throughout:
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a typical ?lm.
pack utilizing a light lock constructed in accord
ance with and embodying a preferred form of my
invention.
Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary detail section
taken through the light lock passageway for the
?lm pack tabs of the ?lm pack shown in Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is a perspective view with parts broken
away showing a typical plate holder provided
35 with a light-tight passageway utilizing the tufted
material of my invention.
Fig. 4 is a fragmentary detail View on a greatly
magni?ed scale showing a portion of a preferred
form of the tufted material utilized in making
40 the passageways for light-sensitive material
light-tight.
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view
of the material shown in Fig. 4.
Figs. 6 and '7 show additional types of tufted
45 material which are suitable for use in connection
with my invention.
In holders for light-sensitive photographic ma~
terial, such as plate holders, ?lm packs and the
like, it is necessary to provide a passageway from
50 the inside to the outside of these holders for the
reception of dark slides or film pack tabs or other
parts which must be manipulated before expos
ing ?lms in the holders. It has previously been
proposed that a plush material may be used for
65 rendering such passageways light~tight, but it
has been extremely dif?cult, if not impossible, to
obtain suitable material which has a sufficiently
thick nap to prevent light from passing through
and which at the same time will not take a de?
nite set after being used, so that upon continued
use, light may enter.
It is desirable to have a material which is com
paratively rugged and stiff, so that it will stand
a lot of bending and compression without becom
ing distorted, but such material is almost always
so coarse that light can pass through. With most
of the equipment on the market the space pro
vided for the light-tight passageway is limited by
the size of the holder, and it will be recognized
that particularly on ?lm and plate holders for
small-sized or “miniature” apparatus, the light
locking material is greatly limited in size so that
the width of the light-locking strip cannot be in
creased beyond a predetermined amount in order
to insure added light safety.
20
My invention broadly comprises making a
light-tight passageway through a light-sensitive
photographic material holder by providing at
least one strip of tufted fabric, the tufts of which
may be arranged in rows, and, if desired, the rows 25
may be parallel but in different spaced relation
one to the other.
Any one row of tufts on this
material is not, in itself. light-tight because each
individual tuft is shaped more or less like a trun
cated cone with the small end down, and be 30
cause of the fabric holding the tufts, it is difficult,
if not impossible to space the tufts close enough
together to prevent light from entering.
How
ever, by staggering the tufts, two or more rows
will make a satisfactory light-tight covering
which may be placed on one or both sides of the
passageway.
I have found that a wool-tufted material is
quite desirable because the wool ?bers do not
readily break off or lose their resilience, and be
cause I have been able to obtain a special weave
of such tufted material which fully answers my
purpose.
In Fig. l I have shown a typical type of ?lm
pack designated broadly as l which may com
prise the usual metal or cardboard container 2,
the walls being substantially rectangular in shape.
One wall 3 is in the form of a frame 4 which
makes an exposure frame through which ex-
_
posures, are made on ?lms attached to tabs 5
which pass through the passageway 53.
The ?lm pack may be of any well-known con
struction and in Fig. 2 I have illustrated a typical
form of light trap for such ?lm packs, but have
equipped this light trap with the tufted fabric of (5
2
my invention.
2,114,638
The ?lm pack tabs 5 may pass
out through the light trap E which is formed
between spaced walls I and 8 of the ?lm pack
and in this instance, on both sides of the passage
way I provide strips of tufted material 9 and ID.
The fabric of the material II and I2 may be ce
mented in place or may be held in by the bent
over metal walls l3 and I 4.
Regardless of how the material is held in, the
10 tufts l5 best shown in Fig. 5, are more or less in
the shape of truncated cones with the small ends
l8 next to the fabric backing II.
It is customary, but not essential, to weave this
material by having two tufts I5 pass through the
15 material with a connected U-shaped twisted part
l8 passing through the fabric connecting the
tufts. After these have been woven through the
fabric, the top may be clipped off at the desired
height.
20
With reference to Fig. 4, it will be seen that
while the rows E9 of tufts may be arranged in
parallel relation transversely of the strip, they
are staggered or offset with respect to other rows
of the material, so that even though light may
25 pass through one row, since the tufts are spaced
apart at their small ends near the fabric, another
row of tufts will block off light passing down
wardly in the direction shown by the arrows in
Fig. 4.
30
It is also possible to have material woven with
the rows of tufts at an angle to the edge of the
material, such as, for instance, is shown in Fig. 6.
Here the tufts are diagrammatically illustrated
at 25 and the arrangement is such again that
35 light passing downwardly in the direction shown
by the arrows will be prevented, before passing
through many rows, from penetrating the tufwd
material any material distance.
It would be quite desirable if the tufts could
40 be arranged in staggered relation over all the
material, as indicated in Fig. 7, so that the tufts
35 would not be in parallel rows or in any regu
lar order. While such material can be woven, it
is extremely expensive and, therefore, from the
45 practical standpoint, it is of comparatively little
use.
In Fig. 3 I have shown a typical plate holder 5|
having an exposure frame 52 which may be nor
mally covered by the usual dark slide 53. Across
the top of the plate holder there may be the
usual ?ange 515 for making a light-tight connec
tion with the camera in which it is placed.
In
plate holders, there are usually two passageways
55 through which dark slides 53 may pass, since
55 plate holders of this type are usually of the
“double” variety. In order to make a light trap
which will prevent light from passing through
Plate holders, of course, are used for a much
longer time than ?lm packs and consequently the
light locking material is subjected to long con
tinued wear.
With tufted material constructed
as above described, I have found that these light
locks retain their efficiency over long periods of
time, because the individual tufts or brush-like
members seem to bend and spring back into place
quite readily, this being particularly true be
cause the tufts can move somewhat like a plu
10
rality of small brushes.
It is obvious that my invention is suitable for
any types of holders in which photographic light
sensitive material is used. Such material, of
course, may be plates, cut ?lms and ?lm packs,
regardless of the type of base that the light-sensi
tive emulsion may be coated upon.
Where I
have referred to light-sensitive material in the
speci?cation and claims, I intend to include all
of the well-known types of emulsion-coated bases. 20
What I claim as my invention and desire to be
secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. In a holder for light-sensitive photographic
material, the combination with a casing, of an
exposure frame carried by the casing, means for
holding light-sensitive material therein, walls in
cluded in the casing spaced apart and forming a
passageway extending through the casing, and a
light trap for said passageway comprising at least
one strip of tufted material comprising a plu 30
rality of rows of tufts, said tufts being so ar
ranged with respect to the edges of the light trap
opening that light passing through the tufts of
one row may be blocked by the tufts of another
row, the tufts of one row being offset with respect
35
to the tufts of another row, said material com—
prising a wool pile fabric, the individual strands
of which are comparatively tough and having a
series of the individual strands made into tufts,
thereby holding the individual strands upwardly
40
from a fabric base.
2. In a holder for light-sensitive photographic
material, the combination with a casing, of an
exposure frame carried by the casing, means for
holding light-sensitive material therein, walls in
cluded in the casing spaced apart and forming a 46
passageway extending through the casing, and a
light trap for said passageway comprising at
least one strip of tufted material comprising a
plurality of parallel rows of tufts, said tufts of
one row being staggered with respect to the tufts 60
of another row whereby light which may pass
between the tufts of one row may be blocked by
the tufts of another row, said material compris
ing a wool pile fabric, the individual strands of
which are comparatively tough and having a
series of the individual strands made into tufts,
this passageway when the dark slide 53 is re
thereby holding the individual strands upwardly
moved for exposing the light-sensitive material,
from a fabric base.
3. In a holder for light-sensitive photographic
material, the combination with a casing, of an 60
exposure frame formed in one wall of the casing,
60 I provide one or more strips of tufted material 56
which may be of the above described varieties
to contact with the dark slide or the walls of the
passageway.
With ?lm packs and to a less extent with plate
holders, it is desirable to have a light trap which
does. not materially retard the passage of material
through the passageway. In ?lrnv packs, the paper
tabs 5 pass through the passageway and it is de
sirable to have them move as freely as possible,
70 and yet it is also necessary to have a light trap
which absolutely prevents light from . passing
through the opening. With tufted material made
as above described, I have found that the tabs
slide very readily and that the light locking prop—
erties are excellent.
means for holding light~sensitive material behind
the exposure frame, said casing walls including a
passageway through the casing through which
tabs attached to the light-sensitive material may 66
pass, and a light trap for said passageway includ
ing at least one strip of a tufted material having
the tufts thereof arranged in staggered relation
to prevent light passing between certain tufts
from passing through said light trap, said tufts 70
pressing against the tabs passing through said
passageway, said material comprising a wool pile
fabric, the individual strands of which are com
paratively tough and having a series of the in—
16
2,114,688
dividual strands made into tufts, thereby holding
the individual strands upwardly from a fabric
base.
4. In a holder for light-sensitive photographic
material, the combination with a casing, of an
exposure frame formed in one wall of the casing,
means for holding light-sensitive material behind
the exposure frame, said casing walls including a
passageway through the casing through which
10
tabs attached to the light-sensitive material may
pass, and a light trap for said passageway in
cluding at least one strip of a tufted fabric hav
3
ing the tufts arranged in a plurality of rows, the
tufts of one row being spaced differently from the
tufts of another row whereby openings between
the individual tufts of one row may be covered
by the tufts of another row and light rays are
prevented from passing through the passageway,
said material comprising a wool pile fabric, the
individual strands of which are comparatively
tough and having a series of the individual strands
made into tufts, thereby holding the individual 10
strands upwardly from a fabric base.
J. HENRY S. PARKER.
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