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Патент USA US2114721

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April 19, 1938..
J_ MIDGLEY
RAIL SWEEP FOR RAILWAY CARS
Filled Dec. 24, 1937
2,114,721
Patented Apr. 19, .1938
'
2,114,721
< v. UNITED .STATES PATENT" OFFICE
V RAIL SWEEP FOR, RAILWAY CARS
Joseph Midgley, Merri?eld, Minn, assignor to
Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., Fairmont,
Minn, a corporation of Minnesota
'
Application December 24, 1937,‘,S'erial No.118L567
8 Claims; ‘(crimp-‘279)
of the invention illustrated
V
in the drawing, 5
“This ‘invention relates to improvements in
indicates
as
a
whole,
a
lighter
type of railway
rail’sweeps for railway cars and ‘it consists of
car in‘cluding'a frame having longitudinal frame
the matters hereinafter described and more par
members'or sills 6 and which frame is mounted
ticularly pointed ‘out in'the appended claims.
The invention relates generally to devices com~ upon front and rear sets or pairs of ?anged u
monly known‘ as rail sweeps used in connection wheels 1 that are adapted to run on the rails
8 of a railway track. The frame members‘ or
with the lighter types of railway cars such as
inspection cars, push, section, gang, hand and sills 6 are in the form of channels with their
similar cars which in their use on track, must
be removed from time to time, to permit the
passage of trains.
The type of rail sweep in most common use
on such cars consists of a relatively short piece
of‘ discarded air hose previously in use on the
15 heavier rolling stock of a railroad. Such hose,
‘which is relatively stiff, is so arranged at one
end of the car} that one'end of said hose comes
into close proximity to the tread ‘of a rail to
sweep'the rail clean of stones and the like, which
cause derailment. With such a sweep,
'20 might
when the other end of the car is raised in vre
moving it from the track, the said end of the
hose comes into contact with‘ the rail and inter
'feres with the smooth free movement of the car
25
during the removal thereof.
_The general object‘of the present invention is
to provide’ a rail sweep construction, whichwhen
a portion thereof engages the rail, in the re
?anges directed inwardly of the car.
'
At each side of that end of the car consti
tuting the advancing end thereof when the car
is in motion, is mounted the improved rail sweep
construction indicated as a whole as at 9. There
isone of such constructions for each rail. As
the parts involved in each rail sweep construc ~15
tion are alike, except for being rights and lefts,
a detailed description of the parts involved in
one sweep construction will su?ice for both.
The improved rail sweep construction includes
a support or bracket I0 adapted for attach
0
merit to the outer surface of the front end of
the frame member or'sill 6, in advance of the
associated pair of wheels ‘I. As herein shown,
said support'is in the form of a flat metallic bar
‘or strap having its front end formed with a
rearwardly facing hook l l spaced outwardly from
the body of the bar. A part of the means-for
attaching the said support to the associated
frame member constitutes a bolt I2 which passes
through the mid portion of the support and the '3
web of the associated member 6 from the outside
thereof, the usual nut being applied to the inner
the‘ rail whereby car removal is ‘facilitated;
“A further object of the invention is to ‘pro- . end of- the bolt as appears in Fig. 4.
[3 indicates a shouldered stud bolt which is so
vide a rail sweep construction which will clear
?xed in the frame member 6 as to pass outward
35 . the rail-and flangeway space (at rail height) of
ly through the web of the same and through the
small stones, snow and the like ‘and ‘will dis
rear end ofsaid support It so as to coact with
charge the same to the outside of the rail. ’
The above mentioned objects of thevinvention, the bolt I 2 ‘to secure the support to the side frame
moval of“ the associated car from the track, will
30 automatically move to an inoperative position
wherein it is entirely free from engagement with
as well as others, together with the several ad,
40 vantages thereof will more fully appear as‘the
speci?cation proceeds.
In ‘ the drawing:
Fig. lyis aview in side elevation of one of the
45
lighter types of railway cars to which the im
proved rail sweep construction has been applied.
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view in side elevation
on an enlarged scale of parts appearing at ‘the
right hand end of Fig. 1 andwhich will be more
fully" referred to later.
50
Fig‘. 31s a detail vertical sectional view through
the'parts shown in Fig. 2 as taken on the line
3—-3 thereof.
Fig. 4 is a top plan view ofthe parts appear
ing in'Fig.'2.
55
..
Referring now in detail ‘to
The arm of the rail sweep is in;
dicated as at I4. As shown herein said arm is 1
cylindrical in cross section and carries a sleeve
7 member ii.
l5_~at its top end that is journalled on that part
of the stud bolt l3 outwardly beyond the frame
member 6. This sleeve is removably held against
endwise movement on the stud‘bolt by a washer
and pin it. About midway between the ends
of the sleeve I5 is a pair of longitudinally spaced
annular shoulders H. The arm I4 is arranged
at other than a right angle to the sleeve l5 so
as to angle slightly outwardly from the sleeve
so that when the sweep construction is in op
erative relation to the rail 8, its other end ap
proaches the median’ line thereof as best'appears
in'Fig‘.
mat embodiment
3.
I‘
_
’
'
-
Said-‘other end of the arm I4 carries a sweep
55
2
2,114,721
ing member 18. This member l8, which extends
When the car has been replaced upon the
diagonally of the rail so as to angle rearwardly
toward the outside of the head of the rail, may
well be made from a piece of belting. As shown
track, the arm is manually returned to its opera
tive position wherein the over-center lock again
becomes effective.
herein, the upper major portion of said member
is disposed between front and rear clamping
plates l9 and 20 secured together and to the
It is apparent that by the construction de
scribed, the arm, in the initial part of removing
the car from the rail, operates automatically to
move into its inoperative position.
The improved sweep'structure is simple in con
struction but e?icient in operation and may be 1O
arm in any suitable manner. The top end of the
front plate I9 is curved over forwardly to serve
10 as a snow ?ange.
2| indicates a part of the actuating member for
applied not only to new cars of the kind men
swinging the arm [4 from its operative to- its in
tioned, but to those already in service.
operative position. As shown herein, said part
is in the form of a bar disposed in the plane
While in describing the invention, I have re
ferred in detail to the form, arrangement and
15 of the space between the pair of shoulders I’! on
the sleeve 15. One end of said bar is curved up
wardly as at 22, the inside of the curve being on
approximately the same radius as the outside of
to be considered only in the illustrative sense so
the sleeve l5. The extremity of said bar end 22
20 is engaged on a cross pin 23 carried by the shoul
ders I‘! and said pin functions as a crank arm.
The other end of the bar 2| is connected to one
construction of the parts involved, the same is 15
that I do not wish 'to be limited thereto except
as may be speci?cally set forth in the appended
claims.
1
I claim as my invention:
20
1. In combination with a railway car having
sets of wheels and adapted to be manually re
end of an elastic element such as a spring 24, ‘ moved from and replaced‘upon the rails upon
the other end of which is connected to the hook which said wheels engage, a rail sweep for one
25 I! of the support or bracket Hi.
When the arm I4 is in its operative sweeping
position with respect to the rail, it stands in
substantially a vertical position with the member
It! in sweeping proximity to the rail and as ap
30 pears in Fig. 2, said arm must swing in a counter
clockwise direction to its inoperative position as
indicated in dotted lines therein. When the arm
is in its vertical operative position as shown in
full lines in Fig. 2, it cannot swing clockwise be
85 yond said position by reason of the engagement
of the curved end part 22 of the bar 2| with the
sleeve l5. In this position of the parts, it is to
be noted that the crank arm pin 23 is disposed
above the horizontal plane of the axis about which
40 the'arm l4 swings and this position of said ‘pin,
in connection with the pull of the spring 24, con
stitutes an overcenter lock for the arm l4 against
further swinging clockwise
sition, said sweep when in its operative posi
tion having an end disposed in sweeping rela
tion with respect to the tread of one of said rails,
and means carried by the car and connected to
said sweep and operative when the other end of
the car is elevated about the axis of said one set
of wheels to engage said end of the sweep with .
said tread to actuate said means carried by the
car .and connected to the sweep to move‘ the same
intoits inoperative position.
'
2. In combination with a railway car having
sets of wheels and adapted to be manually re 40
moved from and replaced upon the rails upon
which said wheels engage, .a rail sweep for one of
beyond _ a vertical
said rails and pivotally connected to the car longi
tudinally outward from one of said sets of wheels
When the arm I 4 is swung counterclockwise
for a swinging movement from an operative
to an inoperative position, said sweep when in its
plane.
45
of said rails and operatively connected to the car
longitudinally outward from one of said sets of
wheels for a movement with respect to the car
from an operativepposition to .an inoperative po
'
through such an angle, that the pin 23 passes
below a plane extending through the axis of the
stud bolt l3 and the point of attachment of the
spring 24 to the support end ll, then said spring
50 functions to swing the arm into the dotted line
inoperative position appearing in Fig. 2, when
the contractile force of the spring is expended.
Assume that the car 5 in Fig. 1 is moving along
the track towards the right and that the arm l4
55 stands in its operative position shown in full lines
in said ?gure wherein the member I8 is disposed
in operative position with respect to the rail. Due
to the angular position of said member with re
spect to the tread of the rail, stones .and the like
60 which may happen to be on said tread are swept
oii toward the outside of the rail.
Assume that it is necessary to remove the
car 5 from the track.
The rear end of’ the car
is lifted upwardly so‘ that the front end swings
65 downwardly about the axis of the axle for the
front wheels. As the rear end of the car is lifted
upwardly, it is >moved slightly rearwardly.
In
this movement of the car, the member l8 engages
the rail and this causes the arm M to swing
70 counter-clockwise through an angle into the rela
tive position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 1,
wherein the overcenter look before mentioned, is
released. When the overcenter lock has been re
leased, the spring 24 contracts to swing the arm
75 into an out of the way position on the car.
operative position having .an end disposed in
sweeping relation with respect to the tread of
one of said rails, and means carried by the car
and connected to said sweep and operative when ,
the other end of the car is elevated about the
axis of said one set of wheels to engage said end
of the sweep with said tread to actuate said means
carried by the car and connected to the sweep
to swing the same into its inoperative position.
55
3. In combination with a railway car having
sets of wheels and adapted to be manually re
moved from and replaced upon the rails upon
which said wheels engage, a rail sweep for one
of said rails and operatively connected to the car 60
longitudinally outward from one of said sets of.
wheels for a movement with respect to the car
from an operative position to an inoperative po
sition, a rail sweeping member carried by'one end
of said rail sweep, said ‘member when said rail 65
sweep is in its operative position standing diag
onally across and in sweeping relation with re
spect to the tread of one of said rails, and means
carried by the car and connected to said sweep
and operative when the other end of the car is 70
elevated about the axis of said one set of wheels
to engage said sweeping member with said tread
to actuate said means carried by the car and
connected to the sweep to move the same into
its inoperative position.
'
, 2,114,721
4. In combination with a railway car having
sets of wheels and adapted to be manually re
moved from and replaced upon the rails upon
which said wheels engage, a rail sweep for one of
said rails and pivotally connected to the car lon
gitudinally outward from one of said sets of
wheels for a swinging movement from an opera
tive to an inoperative position, a rail sweeping
member carried by an end of said rail sweep, said
10 member when said rail sweep is in its operative
position standing diagonally across and in sweep
ing relation with respect to the tread of one of
said rails, and means carried by the car and
connected to said sweep and operative when the
15, other end of the car is elevated about the axis
of said one set of wheels to engage said sweeping
member with said tread to actuate said means
carried by the car and connected to the sweep
to move the same into its inoperative position.
5. In combination with a railway car having
20
sets of wheels and adapted to be manually re
moved from and replaced upon the rails upon
which said wheels engage, a rail sweep for one
. of said rails, means pivotally connecting said rail
25 sweep to the car for, a swinging movement from
8
tively connecting said crank arm and the other
end of said elastic means for swinging the sweep
from the operative position to the inoperative po
sition, said elastic member and said last men
tioned means cooperating in connection with said
crank arm means for holding the rail sweep in
either of its positions.
'7. In combination with a railway car having
sets of wheels and adapted to be manually re
moved from and replaced upon the rails upon
which said wheels engage, a rail sweep for one of
said rails, means pivotally connecting said rail
sweep to the car for a swinging movement from
an operative position with respect to the tread
of one of said rails to an inoperative position, 15
means providing a crank arm forthe pivoted end
of said rail sweep, an elastic member having one
end ?xed with respect to the, car, and means op
eratively connecting said crank arm and the
other end of said elastic means for swinging the 20
sweep from the operative position to the inopera
tive position, said elastic means and said last
mentioned means cooperating with said crank
arm in providing an overcenter lock for yieldingly
25
holding the rail sweep in its operative position.
8. In a rail sweep construction for railway cars,
an operative position with respect to the tread
of one of said rails to an inoperative position, a supporting means adapted for attachment to a
railway car, a sweep arm, means for pivotally
and means including an elastic element for swing
ing the rail sweep from the operative position to ~mo-unting the sweep arm on said supporting 30
30 the inoperative position, said last mentioned means for a pivotal movement from an operative
means being constructed to hold said rail sweep position to an inoperative position,’ means pro
in either of said positions.
,
.
6. In combination with a railway car having
sets of wheels and adapted to be manually re
35 moved from and replaced upon the rails upon
which said wheels engage, a rail sweep for one of
said rails, means pivotally connecting said rail
sweep to the car for aswinging movement from
an operative position with respect to the tread of
one of said rails to an inoperative position, means
providing a crank arm for the pivoted end of said
rail sweep, an elastic member having one end
?xed with respect to the car, and means opera
viding a crank arm associated with the pivoted
portion of said sweep arm, elastic means opera
tively connected at one end to said supporting
means, and means between the other end of said
elastic means and said crank arm forming an
overcenter lock for releasably holding the sweep
arm in its inoperative position, said elastic means
and said last mentioned means, when said arm
is released from its inoperative position, coact
ing to swing the arm into its inoperative posi
tion.
JOSEPH MIDGLEY.
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