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Патент USA US2114822

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Alan-?lm, 193&
F. e. THWAETS
2,3 14,22
VEHICULAR TANK SUPPORT
Filed 901;. 3, 1936
3 Sheets-Sheet l
INVENTOR.
April 19, 1938.
2,1 14,822
F. G. THWAITS
VEHICULAR TANK SUPPORT
Filed Oct. 3, 1936
I
‘ s Sheets-Sheet 2
/ é ‘
INVENTOR‘
Byme?ééw
' . Lyn/WM
ATToRNEYé
April 19, 1938.
F. G. THWAITS
2,1 14,822
VEHICULAR TANK SUPPORT
Filed Oct. 3, 1936
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
IIIIIIII
9
v
WW
ATToRNEYé
2,114,822
Patented Apr. 19, 1938
STATES PATENT OFFIQE
2,114,822
VEHICULAR TANK SUPPORT
Frederick G. Thwaits, Wauwatosa, Wis, assignor
to The Hell 00., Milwaukee, Wis, a corporation
of Wisconsin
Application October 3, 1936, Serial N0. 103,886
14 Claims.
My present invention relates generally to im
provements in the manufacture of vehicles for
transporting materials in bulk, and relates more
speci?cally to various improvements in the con
5 struction of mountings for supporting a tank and
other receptacles upon the chassis of a truck or
similar vehicle.
Generally de?ned, an object of the present in
vention is to provide an improved vehicular tank
10 and side compartment mounting, which is sim
ple and durable in construction, and which is
moreover highly effective in use.
The manufacturers of vehicular tanks for
transporting liquid in bulk, have heretofore been
15 confronted with many di?‘iculties in attempting
to provide simple and durable mountings for
tanks of various sizes and shapes, which mount
ings would be adapted to eiiectively cooperate
with trucks having chassis beams of varied shapes
2O surrounded by various kinds of obstructions and
spaced apart different distances. Such tanks
must be ?rmly attached to the chassis in order to
avoid. relative shifting of the tank and vehicle
especially when the former is loaded, but the
mounting must be surliciently ?exible or resilient‘
25
to prevent transmission of shock from the chassis
to the relatively thin tank shell. Tanks of this
type are also frequently provided with auxiliary
storage compartments and running boards at
30 their opposite sides, and the matter of properly
suspending these compartments and running
boards has also presented relatively complex
problems in the past. While it has heretofore
been customary to especially design a suitable
35 tank mounting and auxiliary compartment sup->
port for each type of tank and truck chassis, this
prior method of meeting the problem has been
too costly and did not permit desirable standard
ization, and the prior compartment supports did
40 not exclude water and moreover undesirably re
stricted the available storage capacity of the
compartments.
.
>
'
It is therefore an object of the present inven
tion to provide a new and useful tank mounting
45 which is adapted to effectively cooperate with
50
(Cl. 280—-5)
chassis beams regardless of obstructions disposed
near the latter.
A further speci?c object of this invention is
the provision of an improved side compartment
and running board mounting which will not in
terfere with the support for the intervening tank,
and which will moreover permit location of the
running boards at any desired level.
Still another speci?c object of the present in~
vention is to provide various improvements in
the details of construction of vehicular tank
mountings of the type generally disclosed in prior
Patent No. 2,008,858, granted July 23, 1935, but
which are more generally applicable to tank ve
hicles so as to reduce to a minimum the cost of 15
construction thereof and which will greatly fa
cilitate the attachment of the tanks and side
compartments to the vehicle proper.
These and other speci?c objects and advan
tages will be apparent from the following de
tailed description.
A clear conception of the various features con
stituting the present improvement, and of the
mode of constructing and of using mountings
built in accordance with the invention, may be 25
had by referring to the drawings accompanying
and forming a part of this speci?cation wherein
like reference characters designate the same or
similar parts in the various views:
Fig. l is a side view of the rear portion of a
truck tank, showing generally the improved mode
of mounting the tank and side compartments
upon the truck chassis;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged transverse vertical sec—
tion through the tank and side compartment sup
and-dash lines;
Fig. 3 is a rear view of one of the side com
partment supporting brackets;
.
Fig. 4 is a side View of the supporting bracket
of Fig. 3;
,
Fig. 5 is a further enlarged side‘ elevation of
one of the tank and compartment mountings
showing the same applied directly over and in
line with one of the chassis beams;
45
Fig. 6 is a transverse vertical section through
tanks and vehicles of various types, and to also
the assemblage of Fig. 5, taken along the line
provide a simple and eiiective side compartment
support which will insure maximum storage space
6--6;
sealed against ingress of rain or the like.
Figs. 5 and 6;
Another speci?c object of my present invention
is the provision of an improved resilient support
for an elongated vehicular tank or the like, which
may be conveniently adjusted so as to most effec
Fig. 8 is a horizontal section through the
mounting structure of Figs. 5 to '7 inclusive, taken
along the line 8-—8 of Fig. 5 but showing the lower
55 tively cooperate with the tank and with the
35
ports, showing the tank and rear wheels in dot
Fig. 7 is a top view of the mounting shown in
50
support in full;
Fig. 9 is a view similar to that of Fig. 8, show- 55
2
2,114,822
ing the lower support offset outwardly wit. re»
spect to the adjacent chassis beam;
Fig. 10 is a transverse vci
2.1 Section through
the assemblage of Fig. 8, taken along the line
"L4G;
Fig. 11 is another view similar to that of Fig. 8,
showing the lower support offset inwardly with
respect to the adjacent chassis beam;
Fig. 12 is a transverse vertical section through
the assemblage as shown in Fig. 11, taken along
the line i2-_i2 of Fig. 11; and
Fig. 13 is a horizontal section through Fig. 10
taken along the line iii-43.
While the invention has been shown and de
15 scribed herein as being applied to an assemblage
including an elliptical sectioned liquid trans
porting tank and barrel carrier compartments
located at the opposite sides of the tank, it is not
the intent to thereby unnecessarily restrict the
scope or field of adaptation of the improved fea
tures.
Referring especially to Figs. 1 and 2 01" the
drawings, the tank vehicle shown therein com_
prises in general an elongated sheet metal tank
25 i5 having either elliptical or any other desired
transverse cross-section; and a transporting
truck having a driver’s cab 95 and channel
shaped parallel chassis beams 5? upon which the
tank I5 is mounted. rearwardly of the cab £6.
The Vehicle or truck is of relatively conventional
construction, the chassis beams i‘! being sup
ported upon wheels is in a well known manner;
and these beams normally being located closely
adjacent
to
numerous
obstructions
such
as
springs and driving mechanism thereby making
only local portions of the beams ii available for
is
attachment
ordinarily ofprovided
the tankwith
i5 thereto.
a propelling
The motor
mounted upon the chassis in front of the cab l6,
and adapted to drive the wheels IS in the usual
manner.
The elongated sheet metal tank i5 may be
formed of separable compartments, or it may
have a unitary outer shell which may be divided
into segregated compartments by means of in
ternal partitions iii as indicated in Fig. 1; and
his tank is also provided with the usual manhole
openings at the top and with liquid dispensing
piping at the bottom usually located between the
50 chassis beams i'i. Disposed between the bottom
of the tank 55 and the top of the chassis beams
ll, are two parallel tubular beam members 28,
the rear open ends of which are ordinarily acces~
sible through
rear storage compartment 2! for
65 insertion or removal of service hose, and which
constitute the main supporting beams for the
tank supporting saddle 22 and for opposite side
auxiliary compartments 23, 2L3 and running
boards 25 disposed at the sides of the tank it, as
The saddle
22 is formed to snugly engage the bottom of the
tank l5 which may be either detachably secured
to the saddle by means of releasable clamping
straps, or welded directly thereto, or otherwise
65 ?rmly attached; and the saddle 2'2 is provided
with depending supporting struts 26 which co
act with and may be rigidly attached to the tubu
lar beam members 20, preferably adjacent each
partition i9 and adjacent the tank ends, by weld
ing or otherwise. These struts
de?nitely ?x
the location of the supporting beam members 20
relative to the saddle "2 and tank 55, and they are
60 clearly illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.
provided with inclined outwardly proje ting low
er faces to which the auxiliary compartments 2;,
75 24 and the running board supporting brackets
2'6 may be rigidly secured by means of bolts or
rivets 28 as depicted in Fig. 2.
The side compartments 23, 24 may be formed
of sheet metal and are preferably of sufficient size
to receive and to conceal barrels, cans or the like,
and these auxiliary compartments are suspended
directly from the beam members 20 by means of
angle brackets 29 in addition to being secured to
the struts 2% as previously indicated. The angle
brackets 29 may be welded directly to the mem 10
bers 25 as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, and such
brackets may be provided wherever necessary;
and the auxiliary compartments 23 are located in
front of the wheels l8 while the compartments 24
are disposed behind these wheels. The side com~ 15
partments 23, 24 may be provided with suitable
closure doors 36; and the brackets 27 which are
concealed within these compartments, form sup
ports for spacing elements 3i which provide
direct supports for the running boards 25. The 20
running boards 25 extend horizontally along the
opposite sides of the tank 15, and the elevation of
these running boards may be determined by a
desired selection of spacing elements 3| of dif
ierent heights. The rear ends oi‘ the running
boards may connect with stairs 32 leading to the
lower rear end of the rear compartment 2| in a
well-known manner, and these stairs cooperate
with the sloping rear end of the compartment 2:’
to produce a highly streamlined appearance. The
tank i5, saddles 22, compartments 2|, 23, 24,
and running boards 25 are thus rigidly attached
to the tubular beam members 20 to produce a
single composite unit capable of being handled as
such for installation purposes; and obviously the
sizes and shapes of the tank and side compart
ments, and the location of the running boards
and beam members may be varied to suit differ
ent conditions.
The tubular beam members
are adapted to 40
mounted upon the chassis beams H with the
aid of the improved mountings shown in Figs. 5
to 13 inclusive, and each of these mountings com
'- ’ses generally an upper saddle block 33 coacting
"-ilth the bottom of the adjacent member 20 and
clamped thereto by means of a pair of U-bolts 34;
a lower support 35 adapted. to rest either direct
ly or through a bearing plate upon the adjacent
chassis beam i‘! and having a central upwardly
extending hollow boss
a resilient annular
buiTer block 3'! snugly embracing the boss 36 and
coacting with the top of the support 35 and with
the bottom of the block 32 witl'iin an annular de
pending ?ange 38 formed integral with the latter;
and a central vertical connecting bolt 39 extend~
ing through the boss 35 and coacting with the
block 33 and support 35 to confine the block 37
in place. The resilient block 37 may be formed
of rubber or the like, and the head of the clamp
ing bolt 39 is con?ned ‘ ithin a recess él? in the
saddle block 33 while the clamping nut 44 co
acting with the bolt as is confined within a cen
tral recess 42 in the corresponding support 35
and coacts with a washer 1113 which in turn coacts
with a resilient washer 4'3 irectly engaging the
support 35. The base of the support 35 is pro
vided with a series of variably notched cars 1'45,
‘it, 5?, of which the central ears [35 project out
wardly to a greater extent than the intermediate
ears
whereas the latter extend outwardly
farther than the end ears 12?. A set of clamping
bolts [58 is adapted to coact with selected cars 45,
636, ill? of the support 35, and with a clamping bar
coact’ g with the bottom of the adjacent
chassis
in ii through clamping nuts 5!] and 75
2,114,822
lock washers, as shown. In order to reenforce
the chassis beam H at each mounting, a jack is
3
transmitted from the beams ii to the tank l5.
each of these jacks has upper and lower blocks
5!, 52 respectively, and an intervening jack screw
When auxiliary compartments 23, 2d and running
boards 25 are utilized, the present improvement
provides simple and effective instrumentalities for
suspending such accessories without subjecting
53. The blocks 5|, 52 have outwardly extending
the tank E5 to undesirable stress. The compart
applied between the horizontal beam ?anges, and
integral ?anges 54 provided with holes which are
ments may also be maintained water tight so as to
adapted to be pierced by the bolts $8 in order to
prevent ingress of rain, and the improvement
retain each jack in proper position Within the
makes maximum capacity available in these side
compartments for storage purposes. The running 10
boards 25 may also be disposed at any desired
10 adjacent chassis beam ll.
During normal use of the improvement, the
tank l5 after being completed, may be ?rmly
mounted upon the saddle 22 after the latter has
been assembled and secured to the tubular beam
members 20, either before or after the auxiliary
compartments 2?», 2G and the running boards 25
have been applied. The brackets 21, 29 which are
initially rigidly associated with the members 26
then effectively support the compartments 23, 24,
and by selecting spacers iii of suitable height, the
running boards 25 may be ?rmly supported at
any desired elevation on opposite sides of the
tank. The assembled saddle 22 and tubular mem
bers 26, together With the tank I5 and compart
ments 23, 24 if these are permanently applied,
may thereafter be handled as a unit for attach
ment to the vehicle. The saddle blocks 33 may be
initially loosely attached to the members 2i) with
the aid of the U-bolts 34, and the lower supports
to 35 may-likewise be loosely initially suspended
from the blocks 33 by means of the bolts 39. The
loosely assembled mountings may then be brought
into approximate position with respect to the
chassis beams H, and thereafter adjusted to per
35 fect coaction and subsequently ?rmlyclamped in
position. Depending upon the relative disposition
of the chassis beams ll, the lower supports 35
may be positioned either as shown in Figs. 8, 9,
or 11, and the clamping bolts 48 and bars 49 may
be ?nally applied together with the reenforcing
jacks, to ?rmly and ?nally lock the supports 35
in place with the bolts 48 located as close as
possible to the beams ii. The variably notched
will
ears obviously
45, d6, d1permit
formedeiiective
on the clamping
lower supports
with the
bars t9 preferably disposed at an angle to the
beams I? so as to secure maximum clamping area
and to prevent possible displacement of the sup
ports 35, and the jack screws 53 may be readily
50 adjusted to augment the clamping effect and to
reenforce the channel beams H’. The improve
ment thus provides an eifective mounting and at
tachment cooperable with chassis beams spaced
different distances apart, and the assemblage
may obviously be readily handled and applied to
trucks of various types. By virtue of the ad
justability oi‘ the mountings afforded by the sup
ports 35 and blocks 33, relative to the tubular
members 253, these mountings may be disposed so
as to avoid interfering with obstructions which
may be located near the chassis beams ii, and
this adjustability also permits standardization of
the mounting for various types of tank trucks.
From the foregoing description it will be ap
(35 parent that the present invention provides an
improved mounting for vehicular tanks and aux
iliary compartments, which'is simple, compact
and durable in construction, and which may
moreover be conveniently applied to various
70 classes of truck tank assemblages. With the im
proved mounting, the supports may be most ef
fectively located so as to insure proper mounting
of the tank regardless of its shape, and the re
silient buffer blocks 31 and the washers ‘l4 func
75 tion to absorb shock which might otherwise be
elevation, and the entire assemblage is especially
adapted to insure obtaining of maximum stream
lined effect in the external appearance of the
assembled vehicular tank. The use of tubular
beams 2!) is preferable because of the added
strength and the hose storage space made avail
able thereby. The invention has proven extreme
ly practical in actual commercial use and great
iy facilitates the manufacture and assemblage of 20
truck tanks without sacri?cing durability.
It should be understood that it is not desired
to limit the present invention to the exact details
of construction and to the precise mode of as
sembling tank mountings, as herein shown and 125'
described, for various modi?cations within the
scope of the claims may occur to persons skilled
in the art.
I claim:1. In combination, a pair of laterally spaced 30
tubular beams, a saddle rigidly connecting said
beams, a tank secured to said‘ saddle, brackets
secured to said beams independently of said sad
die, and side compartments mounted upon said
brackets, said side compartments also being se
cured directly to said saddle and the tops of said
compartments providing running boards on oppo
site sides of said tank.
2. In combination, a pair of laterally spaced
parallel beams, a saddle rigidly connecting said
beams, a tank supported by said saddle, side com
partments secured to said saddle, the tops of said
side compartments providing running boards on
opposite sides of said tank, brackets secured to
said saddle and extending into said. compartments
beneath said running boards, and spacers inter
posed between said brackets and said running
boards.
3. In combination, a pair of laterally spaced
parallel beams, a saddle rigidly connecting said
beams, a tank supported by said saddle, side com
partments secured to said saddle, the tops of said
side compartments providing running boards on
opposite sides of said tank, brackets secured to
said saddle and extending into said compart
ments beneath said running boards, spacers in
terposed between said brackets and said running
boards, and common means for attaching said
brackets and said compartments directly to said
saddle.
4. In combination, a pair of laterally spaced
beams, a saddle rigidly connecting said beams, a
tank supported upon said saddle, side compart
ments secured to said saddle, supporting brackets
for said compartments secured directly to said
‘beams, other brackets secured to said saddle and
extending into said compartments, and spacers
interposed between said other brackets and the
tops of said compartments, said compartment
tops being located above the top of said saddle on
opposite sides of said tank.
5. In combination, a pair of laterally spaced
beams, a saddle mounted upon and rigidly inter
connecting said beams, a tank supported by said
35
55
60
65
70
saddle, side compartments suspended from said 75
2,114,822
beams, mounting blocks coacting with said beams
for adjustment therealong, and supports for said
mounting blocks angularly adjustably attached
thereto, said blocks and said supports providing
mountings for said beams located between said
compartments.
6. In combination, a pair of parallel tubular
beams, a tank supported by said beams, chassis
beams disposed beneath said tubular beams,
10 mounting blocks coacting directly with said tubu
lar beams, supports coacting directly with said
chassis beam, a pivotal connection between each
of said mounting blocks and the complementary
support, and a resilient block interposed between
each support and the adjacent mounting block.
7. In combination, a pair of parallel tubular
beams, a tank supported by said beams, chassis
beams disposed beneath said tubular beams,
mounting blocks coacting directly with said tubu
lar beams, supports coasting directly with said
chassis beam, a pivotal connection between each
of said mounting blocks and the complementary
support, and a resilient block interposed between
each support and the adjacent mounting block,
25 said resilient blocks surrounding said pivotal con
nections.
8. In combination, a pair of upper beams, a
tank supported by said beams, chassis beams dis—
posed beneath said upper beams, mounting blocks
secured to said upper beams, resilient blocks co
acting with said mounting blocks, and supports
coacting with said resilient blocks and with said
chassis beams, said supports being adjustably at
tached to both said mounting blocks and said
35 chassis beams.
9. In combination, a pair of tubular beams, a
tank mounted upon said beams, chassis beams
of channel shape disposed beneath said tubular
porting beams and said chassis beams, said
mountings having ears of different lengths co
acting with said chassis beams, and attaching
bolts for said mountings coacting with said ears
and located closely adjacent to said chassis beams.
11. In combination, an elongated tank, sup
porting beams disposed beneath said tank and
extending longitudinally thereof, chassis beams
disposed beneath said supporting beams, inter
vening mountings interposed between said sup
porting beams and said chassis beams, said
mountings having ears of diiferent lengths coact
ing with said chassis beams, attaching bolts for
said mountings coacting with said ears and lo
cated closely adjacent to said chassis beams, and
clamping bars coacting with said bolts and with
the lower faces of said chassis beams, said bars
being disposed diagonally across said lower faces.
12. In combination, a tank, channel shaped
chassis beams disposed beneath said tank, mount 20
ings for said tank resting upon the upper ?anges
of said chassis beams, clamping bars for said
mountings coacting with the lower ?anges of said
chassis beams, and jack screws interposed be
tween sai'l beam flanges adjacent to said mount
ings.
13. In combination, a tank, channel shaped
chassis beams disposed beneath said tank, mount
ings for said tank resting upon the upper ?anges
of said chassis beams, clamping bars for said 30
mountings coacting with the lower ?anges of said
chassis beams, jack screws interposed between
said beam ?anges adjacent to said mountings, and
clamping bolts connecting said mountings and
said bars, said bolts coacting with said jacks to 35
prevent displacement thereof.
is. In combination, an elongated tank, chassis
beams having superimposed ?anges the upper of
beams, resilient mountings interposed between
which support said tank, mountings interposed
said tubular beams and said chassis beams, and a
between said tank and said upper beam ?anges, 40
said mountings having side notches of different
jack screw coacting with said chassis beams adja
cent to each of said mountings.
10. In combination, an elongated tank, sup
porting beams disposed beneath said tank and
extending longitudinally thereof, chassis beams
disposed beneath said supporting beams, inter
vening mountings interposed between said sup
depths disposed in series along said beams, and
clamping bolts for said mountings coacting with
selected notches of each series to position said
bolts closely adjacent the edges of said beam
?anges regardless of the lateral spacing thereof.
FREDERICK G. THWAITS.
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