close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2114993

код для вставки
April 26, 1938.
'
F1 |_, BRAND-r
2,114,993
SHOE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURING THE SAME
Filed Oct. 29, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
April 26, 1938;
F_ |__ BRANDT
2,114,993
SHOE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURING THE SAME
Filed 001;. 29, 1935
,
48
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
wvfwwar
M K44
2,114,993
Patented Apr. 26, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT
OFFICE
_ 2.114.993
' vSHOE‘; AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURING
THE SAME
Francis L. Brandt, Wake?eld, Mass., assignor to '
United Shoe
cry Corporation, Paterson,
N. 3., a corporation of New Jersey ,
Application October 29; 1935, Serial No. 47,284
18 Claims. (01. 12-142)
This invention relates to shoemaking and is
illustrated as embodied in shoes the heels of
which are attached with adhesives, and with
reference to methods of attaching the heels to
the shoes.
'
'
'
~
It is common’ practice to attach wood heels to
shoes by nails or screws which are driven from
the inside of the shoe after the last has been
pulled. While various ?nishing operations such
10 as securing covering ?aps to the breasts of the
heels, edge trimming, edge setting and scouring,
are being performed, the heel should form an in-'
tegral part of the shoe, the shoe at this time
preferably being on the last in order to maintain
15 the shape of the shoe and to facilitate carrying
out the above operations. In order to avoid
having to pull the last for the purpose'of securing
the heel to the shoe by inside nailing and then
having to reinsert the last in the shoe, it is cus
20 tomary in the manufacture of the better grades
of shoes to secure the heel temporarily by glue
to the shoe preparatory to performing the vari
ous‘?nishing operations. lifter the shoe has been
substantially completed and the last has been
25 pulled the heel is permanently secured to the
the shoes some of therheels become detached be
fore the heel-attaching nails or permanent screws
are inserted. Even though the heels do not be
come detached, they frequently spring away from
their molded positions upon the heel seats of the 5
shoes. Such a condition is unsatisfactory, partic
ularly in the case of Louis heel work in which the. ,
heel has a covering ?ap secured to its breast and
is seldom restored to its original position upon
the shoe at the time of the permanent attaching 1o
operation, with the result that a wrinkle is formed
in the ?ap in the vicinity of the heel-breast line
of the shoe.
'
With the above and other considerations in
view and in accordance with a feature of the pres- 15
ent invention, ‘I propose toprovide a shoe and ‘a
heel which is to be attached to the shoe with >
anchoring means, and to interpose a mass of hot
thermoplastic material between the heel and the
shoe.
The heel is then pressed against the heel " '
seat of the shoe to force the thermoplastic mate- 2°
rial into interlocking engagement with said an
chorlng means, pressure of the heel against the
shoe being maintained until the thermoplastic
material cools and hardens.
shoe by nails or screws.
When a quantity of thermoplastic adhesive is 25
In order to retain as much as possible
the’ used to attach the heel to the shoe, the time dwell
pressure of the heel against the heel seat of the during which the heel need be held against the
shoe for the purpose of preventing the shoe mate
heel seat with molding pressure is reduced mate- '
30 rials from springing back while the ?nishing oper- ' rially and there is little danger of the heel becom
ations are being performed and to insure that ing loose as the operator performs the various
the heel seat shall set in permanently molded ?nishing operations. When the last has been re
position, it is often the practice to use a tempo
moved from the shoe the thermoplastic material
rary attaching screw inserted as disclosed in may, if desired, be supplemented by nails or
35 United States Letters Patent No. 1,502,014, grant;
ed July 22, 1924 on an application ?led in the
name of Frederic E. Bertrand.
In attaching the heel to the shoe temporarily
_
by glue the heel is clamped with considerable pres
40 sure against the heel seat of the shoe upon the
last for a period suf?cient to allow the glue to dry.
The heels may be temporarily attached to the
shoes by the use of a heel-attaching machine of
the turret type, for example as disclosed in Let
screws.
,
85
Furthermore, by utilizing an undercut or re-‘
entrant cavity in the attaching face of the heel
and a similar cavity or other appropriate anchor
ing means in the heel-seat portion of the shoe,
the thermoplastic material may be forced to take 40
the form of a' rivet which, after it has set, has
such a strength and permanence and suchv an
interlocking engagement with the shoe and heel
as will enable it to serve as the entire heel
45 ters Patent of the Unitedv States No. 1.376.539, attaching means. The thermoplastic material, 45
granted May 3, 1921 on an application ?led in the - preferably in the form of a plug, is insertedin .
names of Isabelle Henne and John L. Free, in one of the undercut cavities and the heel is.
which heels are pressed upon the shoes for a sub
forced with molding pressure against the heel
stantial period thereby permitting the glue to dry seat while the plug is in moldable condition; the
50 before the shoes are removed from the machine heel being then clamped against the heel seat 50
and go forward for subsequent. operations.
,
‘The results obtained when using the temporary
attaching screw have been generally satisfactory.
It has been found, however, that when glue alone
65 is relied upon to attach the heels temporarily to
‘ until the heel seat has become permanently‘ ._
molded and until. the thermoplastic material has
set. The plug should be of a size to ?ll both the
cavities as well as to ?ll, so far as practicable, the
space included between the attaching face of the 55
2
2,114,993
heel and the heel seat of the shoe, as well as all the insole 34, (Fig. 3) of the shoe. During the
interstices or voids in the latter. With the above heel-attaching operation the rim 36 of the at
taching face 28 of the heel 30 is forced with mold- .
arrangement the heel is effectively secured to the
shoe upper by a large'rivet of hardened material
which may be said to be clenched to the heel and
to the heel seat and its respective ends‘ and which
is of su?icient strength to'serve as the entire
ing pressure against the overlasted counter por
tion 38 of the shoeupper, the rim forming a
shallow groove 40 (Fig. 3) in the previously some
what rounded margin 42 (Fig. 1) of the heel seat
heel~attaching means.
of the shoe.
In order to provide an exceptionally strong
10 and durable form-retaining heel end structure
‘
In order to insure that the heel 30 may be ef
for the shoe a further feature of the invention
fectively secured to the shoe 22 while various 10
?nishing operations are being performed upon
resides in the provision of an insole having a.
the shoe and until the last 24 has been pulled
?bre reenforcement attached thereto extending
and the heel has been nailed or otherwise per
to the margin of the heel seat, which reenforce
15 ment has a projecting portion which may be em
bedded in the hardened mass of thermoplastic
manently attached to the shoe, I propose to in
cement in a. manner to hold the overlasted mar
gin of the shoe upper tightly clamped between
the reenforcement and the rim of the heel.
It
20 is further contemplated that a shank stiffener
be locked in the mass of thermoplastic material
and this may be done either independently of the
above-mentioned reenforcement or by combining
the shank stiffener and the reenforcement as a
25 single unit thereby obtaining in a maximum de
gree the qualities of strength and rigidity which
arev so desirable in the heel portion of a shoe.
The above and other features of the invention
in both its method and shoe structure aspects
30 will be better understood and appreciated from
reading the following detailed description there
I of in connection with the accompanying draw
ings, in which
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a shoe upon a
35 last, the heel-seat portion of the sole of the shoe
terpose a substantial quantity of thermoplastic 15
adhesive 44 between the heel 30 and the heel
seat of the shoe 22, the heel then being forced
with moldingpressure against the heel seat of
the shoe and being clamped in molding relation
with the heel seat for a period of sufficient dura
tion to insure thesetting of the adhesive.
_ The thermoplastic adhesive 44 may convenient
ly be applied to the attaching face 28 of the
heel 30 by a plate 46 of suitable shape. Although
the thermoplastic adhesive 44 is illustrated with 25.
reference to itsapplication to the heel, it will
be understood that the adhesive-may be applied
instead to the heel seat of the shoe, or to both.
The adhesive 44 is preheated to insure that the
same shall be readily moldable under pressure 30
of the heel. During the heel-attaching opera
tion the adhesive 44 ?lls practically all the voids
included between the attaching face 28 of the
heel 30, and the heel seat of the shoe thereby
providing a large area of bonded contact between 35
having been ?tted for the reception of a Louis
the heel and the heel seat.
heel;
The heel 30 may be effectively forced against ‘
the heel seat of the shoe 22 mounted upon a sup
-
Fig. 2 shows in perspective a heel with a mass
of thermoplastic adhesive applied to its attach
ing face, and a tool for applying the adhesive to
the heel;
Fig. 3 is a perspective view, partly in section,
showing the heel of Fig. 2 after it has been forced
with molding‘pressure against the heel seat of the
45 shoe ofFlg. 1;
I
Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a sole having a
?bre reenforcement secured thereto;
Fig. 5 shows a covered Cuban heel having an
port 48, by a tread clamp 50‘ and a back clamp
52 constructed and arranged to engage a thick 40
leather apron 54 which covers the rear face of
the heel, the shoe being positioned lengthwise
relatively to the clamps by a back gage 56. A
machine which comprises the above-mentioned
elements and which may be advantageously used 45
for clamping heels to shoes, is disclosed in United
States Letters Patent No. 2,076,537, granted April
13, 1937 on an application ?led in the name of
Bazzoni, a covering ?ap 51, in accordance with a
undercut cavity in its attaching face;
Fig. 6 is a perspective view, partly in section,
50
preferred practice, being applied to the breast of
'of the heel end of a shoe having a short outsole,
an insole such as that illustrated in Fig. 4, and
a shank stiffener;
Fig. '7 is a vertical section of the heel illustrated
heels‘ are temporarily attached to shoes by ther
moplastic adhesive as above described there is
55 in Fig. 5 and of the vheel end_of the shoe illus
trated in Fig. 6, a plug of moldable thermoplas
tic adhesive being positioned in the undercut
cavity formed in the attaching face of the heel;
Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the heelend of
60 the shoe illustrated in Fig. 7, a plug of thermo
plastic adhesive being inserted ln a reentrant or
undercut ‘cavity formed in the heel seat of the
shoe; and
Fig. 9 is a transverse section taken through
65 the heel end of the shoe after the heel has been
permanently attached to the shoe.
In the manufacture of the shoe 22, which is
20
the heel by the machine while the heel is held
under molding pressure against the shoe. When
little, if any, trouble experienced due to the heels 55
becoming loose between temporary and perma
nent heel-attaching operations.
While it‘ may be impracticable to attempt to
fill absolutely all the voids or interstices included
between the attaching face of the heel and the 60
heel seat of the shoe, since it is desirable to in
sure that the thermoplastic adhesive 44 shall not ,
.seep from between the rim 36 of the heel 30
and the counter portion of the shoe, neverthe
less by using reasonable care and an appropriate 65
quantity of thermoplastic material these spaces
may be substantially ?lled. It will be understood
illustrated asmounted one last 24, a pair 01' I that the heel-seat portions of the soles may be
heel-breast receiving shoulders. l8 (Fig. 1) have reduced to various shapes, the amount of thermo
70 been formed upon the sale 20 and the heel-seat plastic adhesive used varying .in accordance with 70
the shape of the reduced heel seat.
portion of the sole has been reduced thereby pro
In order permanently to secure heels to shoes
viding a tongue 26 of suitable shape'to be in
cluded within the attaching face 28v of a wood by thermoplastic adhesive without the aid of
heel 30, tacks 32 being employed, in accordance nails or screws, the procedure illustrated in Figs.
4 to 9 may be utilized. In those ?gures a shoe 75
us with usual practice, to secure the tongue 26 to
2,114,993
58 is provided with a Cuban heel 80 which is se
cured to the shoe by a rivet 62 of hardened ther
moplastic adhesive, best shown in Fig. 9. The
insole 64 (Fig. 4) of the shoe 58 has a ?bre're
enforcement 66 adheslvely or otherwise secured
to it, the reenforcement having a channel 68 for
receiving a shank sti?'ener ‘I0 and a hollow frusto
conical projecting portion ‘I2 which is located
' at the rear end of the channel and maybe de
10 scribed as being funnel-shaped with its smaller
end'projecting from the insole. The attaching
face 14 (Fig. 5) of the heel 60 is provided with
an undercut conical cavity 16. After the shoe
58 has been lasted the shank stiffener 10 is tacked
15 or otherwise secured to the insole, the sti?ener
3
heel clamped to the heel seat for a period suffi
cient to insure the setting of the adhesive.
2. The method of attaching a heel to a shoe 1
which comprises providing recesses in the heel
and the shoe, interposing a mass of self-harden
ing plastic material in a plastic condition be
tween the heel and the shoe, pressing the heel
against the heel seat of the shoe to force the
plastic material into said recesses, and permit
ting the plastic material to harden.
3k The method of attaching a heel to a shoe
10
which comprises providing cavities in the heel
and the shoe, interposing a mass of hot thermo~
plastic material between the heel and the shoe,
pressing the heel upon the shoe to force the ther 15
moplastic material into said cavities, and per
mitting said material to cool and harden.
being of suitable shape to ?t within the chan
nel 68 of the ?bre reeniorcement 68 and having
a' bent rear end 18 which extends into the hol
4. The method of attaching a heel to a shoe
low conical projecting portion ‘I2 of the ?bre re
which comprises providing the heel and the shoe
20 enforcement 66. A short outsole 80 provided
with anchoring means, interposing a mass of hot 20
with a heel-breast receiving shoulder 82 (Figs. thermoplastic material between the heel and the
6 and 7) is then attached to the shoe 58. The shoe, pressing the heel upon the. shoe to force the
rivet 62 of thermoplastic adhesive is formed - thermoplastic material into interlocking engage
from a, lump or plug 84 which, after being heated ment with said anchoring means, and permitting
25 to the proper moldable temperature, is inserted
said material to cool and harden.
25
within the cavity 16 (Fig. '7) of the heel 60. The - 5. The method of making a shoe which com
shoe 58 is then mounted upon the support, 48 prises securing to an insole a heel seat reenforc
and the heel 60 is forced, for example by the , ing element having a projecting portion, lasting
use of the heel-attaching machine above referred an upper and counter over the'insole and secur
30 to, against the heel seat of the shoe which may ing them thereto, attaching an outsole to the
be described as having a reentrant or undercut shoe leaving the projecting portion of said reene
cavity 86 (Fig. 6). The lump or plug 84 of ther
forcing element exposed, providing a heel with
moplastic adhesive may be inserted in the cav
an anchoring means, interposing a mass of plastic
ity 86 (Fig. 8) of the heel instead of being in
material between the heel and the heel seat of
35 serted in the cavity 16 of the heel. The hardened the shoe, pressing the heel against said heel seat
35
rivet 62 of thermoplastic adhesive ?lls the un
to force the plastic material into interlocking
dercut or reentrant cavities ‘I6, 86 and also ?lls engagement with said anchoring means and the
a considerable portion, preferably all or sub
projecting portion of said reenforcing element,
stantially all, of the space between the heel seat and permitting said plastic material to harden.
of the shoe and the attaching face of the heel.
6. The method of securing“ a heel having an 40
The heel is clamped in molded relation with undercut cavity in its attaching face to a shoe
the shoe for a period su?icient to insure the provided with a heel seat having an undercut
hardening of the thermoplastic material, the heel ' cavity, comprising inserting a plug of moldable
. thereafter being held securely in its molded po
thermoplastic adhesive into one of said cavities,
45 sition upon the shoe by the rivet 62 of hardened forcing the heel against the heel seat with mold
thermoplastic adhesive which may be said to be ing pressure while the plug is moldable to cause 45
clenched at opposite ends within the undercut said adhesive to ?ll said cavities and to ?ll’ at
cavities ‘I6, 86. In the illustrated construction least a substantial portion of the voids included
the bent rear end ‘I8 of the shank stiffener ‘I0 between said heel seat and said attaching face,
50 is preferably embodied within the rivet 62 and
in combination with the ?bre reenforcement 66
secures the heel to the rear end of the shoe up
per and provides an exceptionally strong and
durable form-retaining heel end structure for the
55
shoe.
N
.
and maintaining pressure of the heel against the 50
heel seat until the adhesive has set thereby per
manently securing the heel to the shoe.
7.- A shoe the heel and heel seat of which have
undercut, cavities ?lled with a hardened mass of
plastic material which is ofsu?icient strength to
55
A thermoplastic adhesive which may be e?ec
secure the heel permanently to the shoe.
tively used for attaching heels to shoes is dis
8. A shoe the heel-seat portion of which has
closed in United States Letters Patent No. an undercut cavity, a heel engaging said heel
1,945,803, granted February 6, 1934 on an appli seat portion and also having an undercut cavity,
cation ?led in the name of Myron E. Delaney.
said heel being secured to the shoe by a rivet 60
Ha'ving described the invention, what I claim consisting oi’ a hardened mass of thermoplastic
as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of material engaged in and substantially ?lling both
of said cavities.
the United States is:
'
'
9. A shoe having a heel seat provided with a
1. The ‘method of attaching heels to shoes
65 which comprises providing a. shoe upper which cavity, a shank sti?’ener, and a heel engaging said
65
has a reentrant cavity in its heel seat, providing heel seat and- having a cavity in its attaching
a heel having a reentrant cavity in its attaching face, the heel being secured to the heel seat by
face, interposing a quantity of moldable thermo- a hardened mass of plastic material interengag
plastic adhesive between said heel seat and said ing the cavities ‘in the heel and the heel seat and
70 attaching face, clamping the heel under heavy permanently embedding and locking a portion
molding pressure against the heel seat while the of the sti?ener.
_
'
adhesive is in a moldable condition thereby caus- ‘
10. A shoe having a heel seat containing a
ing the same to ?ll said cavities as well as to reentrant cavity, a heel having a reentrant cavity
?ll voids included betweenthe attaching face of in its attaching face, a mass of hardened plastic
75 the heel and the heel seat, and maintaining the material engaged in said cavitiesand connecting 7s '
4
2,114,993
the heel to the shoe, and a shank stiil'ener the
rear end of which extends into the cavity in the
heel seat and is embedded andlocked in said
material.
11. A shoe the heel end of which comprises an
insole, a rigid reenforcing member attached to
the lower face of the heel “portion of the insole,
said member extending substantially to the
margin of the heel seat of the shoe and having
10 a hole in its central portion to provide a cavity
the bottom' of which is formed by the insole,
a heel having an attaching face provided with
recess, a fibre reenforcement secured to the lower
face of the insole, said reenforcem'ent having a
funnel-shaped portion the smaller end of which
projects toward the heel, and a short outsole, all
of said parts being engaged and securedtogether
by a hardened mass of plastic material.
15. A shoe having‘ a heel provided with an ,
undercut cavity in its attaching face, an insole, V
a reenforcing member secured to the lower face,
of-the insole and having a ‘funnel-shaped pro 10
jection the smaller end of which extends toward
the heel, a shank sti?ener the rear end of which
a cavity, a shoe upper having an overlasted
extends toward theheel and into the funnel- .
margin clamped between the reenforcing member
shaped projection, all ofv the- above parts being
engaged and secured together by a hard mass of 15
15 and the heel, and‘a massof hardened plastic
material interlocked within said cavities and
serving to maintain the edge of the heel tightly
against the heel seat.
12. A shoe having a heel provided with a cavity
20 in its attaching face, an insole, a reenforcing
thermoplastic material.
16. A step product consisting of a shoe ready
to receive a heel, said shoe being provided with
a cavity which is included within the heel-seat
of the shoe and is limited in depth by the insole 20
member which is secured to the lower face of the ~ of the shoe, and a mass of thermoplastic material
'
insole and has an anchoring portion extending in said cavity.
17. A step product consisting of a shoe ready to
toward the heel, and a shank stiffener the rear
end of which extends toward the heel, all of the receive a heel, said shoe being provided with an
25 above parts being secured together by a mass of undercut cavity which is included within the 25
hard thermoplastic material.
'
13. A shoe having/an insole, a ?bre reenforce
ment secured to the lower face of the insole, said
reenforcement having a hollow, frusto-conical
heel seat of the shoe andis limited in depth by
the insole of the shoe, and a mass of thermoplastic
material in said cavity.
.18. An insole for use in the manufacture of '
shoes having a relatively rigid reenforcement se-, '30.
the insole and a heel having an~undercut cavity cured to the lower face of its heel-seat portion,
the reenforcement having at its lower face a hoi
in its attaching face, all of the parts being se
cured together by a hardened mass of plastic low frusto-conical portion the smaller end of
which projects from the insole and a channel ex
material substantially ?lling the hollow frusto
conical portion of the reenforcement and the tending through a portion of said projection and 35
constructed and arranged to receive a shank
undercut cavity of the heel.
14. A shoe having an insole, a heel the attach
FRANCIS L. BRANDT.
a ing face of which is provided with an undercut
30 portion the smaller end of which projects from
stiffener.
,
,
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
731 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа