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Патент USA US2115542

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April 26, 1938.
c. w. SMITH .
2,115,542
RAIL BRAKE
Filed Jan. 28. .1957 '
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
/2
3a2/
1%
Yig.
I
a“
‘
INVENTOR
CARL- W SMITH
ATTORNEY
April 26, 1938.
2,1 15,542
C. W. SMITH
RAIL BRAKE
‘
Filed Jan. 28. 1957
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
‘
.
INVENTOR
CARL w SMITH;
BY
-
ATTORNEY
Patented Apr. 26, 1938
2,115,542
PATENT OFFICE
~
2,115,542 7‘
_.
v,
RAILBRAKEQ
1
p.
.
can W. smith, ‘Glendale, cant, I assignor to "The . p ‘
~ " Westinghouse »Air~‘Bi-ake Company, Wilmerding,
_ ‘ . "1:. lapplicatison?anuary
. Pa, a corporationlo'f
28,1937,
Pennsylvania
Serial No.
‘122,753
v
1 '2V Claims.-_ (01. 188-165)
This inventionrelates to ‘rail brakes‘ for ve
hicles, such as railway trains, and the principal
object of the invention is tov guard against and
‘prevent injury to therailrbrake shoes, as'well as
to the associatedumounting‘ and lifting mecha”
shoeslmay strike the switch frog and be later- ‘
nism, caused by ‘the failure of, the brake shoe to
ally diverted.
over-ride obstructions in the line of travel or the
Fig. 4 is a fagmentary sectional view,‘ taken on
the line 4—4 of Fig. .3, further illustrating how
the rail brake shoes may strike the switch frog
or point and be laterally diverted,
.
‘shoe while sliding alon'gthe rail in contact there
with.
P10
The usual type of‘rail brake shoe hasabevel
at the opposite ends‘thereof which inclines up
wardly from the ‘rails to assist in enabling the
rail‘ shoe 'to over-ride irregularities in‘ ‘the .‘level
of the rails, as at the“ jointstbetween successive
:15
'Fig. 3is a diagrammatic view of a railroad
track and a switch frog, with rail brake shoes,
not embodying my invention,so positioned as to
illustrate the manner in which the rail brake
rail
sections.
'
'
‘
‘
‘
'
‘
‘
.‘10
Fig.5 is a fragmentary elevational view, show
7 ing one end of a rail brake shoe embodying my
invention,
.
Figs. Sand 7 are perspective Views of two de
tachably constituted skid blocks in their relative _ 15
‘
I have found, howevenfthatthe usualbevel-on - positions as secured to one end ‘of a rail brake’
the end of‘ the rail shoes is ‘ineffective to‘ enable shoe, and l the shoe to ‘over-ride ‘a switch ‘frog or point'which ‘
may project above thellevelof thefrails of the
main track. " A particularinstance is-known of
a rail shoe,‘having the‘ usual'bevel at the ends
thereof, which caught “on'a projectingswitch
frog or point in endeavoring to- follow the wheel
‘trucks passing from them‘ainftrack ‘to a side
Fig. 8, is a. fragmentary sectional view corre
sponding to the view in Fig. 4 and showing in
further detail the mannerin which the skid
blocks comprising my invention are secured to 20
the track shoes, as well as the manner in which
the skid blocks are effective to permit the track
shoe to ride over obstructions on the rail, such
track divergent from_ the main track at the as the. raised edge of a switch frog or point.
switch and failed; to over-ride the projecting
As shown inFig. 1 of the drawings, the rail 0
switch frog. Serious‘ physical damage ‘to the - brake shoe assemblylmay comprise a rail brake
rail shoe‘itself, as‘ well as to the ‘mounting ‘and shoe H suitably mounted on a wheel-truck hav
‘lifting mechanism for the rail‘shoe, resulted; The
and front and rear wheels I3 which roll along a
repair the damage, which, in-thelinstance known,
was several weeks due to the ‘difficulty in securing
The rail brake shoe Il may be of the magnetic
type and may comprise a suitable magnetic core.
structure having two spaced, laminated side por
tions. III to which are respectively secured two
spaced oppositely disposed‘pole pieces [5 of suit- _ jco5
able ‘magnetic material such as cast‘ iron. A
suitable'?llerror spacer ‘l6 of non-magnetic ma
replacement‘parts.
‘
l.
r‘
.,
;
=
"
My invention ‘is accordingly-designed‘ to ‘pre
V35 vent the occurrence of such.‘ damage tofthe rail
brake shoe and its mounting and lifting mecha
nism, as well‘as the attendant lossbfrtime that
the car is out of service‘ while the damages are
‘ an
ing side‘frames 12, only ‘one of which is shown,
car having the rail shoe was consequently put
out of service for the length of time required ‘to
being repaired. The invention :comprises the
provision of what Ihave‘. designatedas ‘l‘skid
blocks” or curved “nose” members‘ which are
“suitably formed or .securedlat each of the ‘four
corners of the rail brake ‘shoe, which skid blocks
are especially designed ltofenable the ‘rail ‘shoe
to‘ ride up over obstructions in the" path of the
shoe, such as a projecting switch frogor :point. I
My invention will be described in detail here
inafter in connection with the accompanying
drawings,
wherein,
,_
"
1
>
._
>
Fig. 1 is a fragmentaryelevational view,‘ show
ing a magnetic rail brake shoe assembly embody
ing my
invention,
.
i‘
.
i
Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2--2
of Fig. 1 showing in further detail the rail brake
shoe assembly,v
‘
.
track
rail
I‘9.
‘
‘
‘
'
l
30
terial is interposed between the opposite pole
pieces IE to prevent the entrance of dust or dirt
particles between ‘the pole pieces‘ IF). A‘ plurality 40
of electromagnet coils l1, only one of‘which is
shown in Fig. 2, ‘are mounted between the; side
portions‘ M of the magnetic core structure, the
coils l'l' having a central‘ axial core extending
therethrough from one side portion M to ‘the as 5
opposite side portion l4. As will be notedpin
Figs. 1 and 2, the rail shoe II is normally sus
pended in vertical alignment with the rail I9,
the pole pieces [5 extending longitudinally of
the rails and adapted to slidingly contact the“,
rail when the shoe is su?iciently lowered from its
. normal position.
>
The pole piecesl5 are provided at the opposite.
ends thereof with the usual bevel 18 for assisting
linenabling therail shoes to slide‘over uneven rail / 5.5
2
2,115,542
joints and other similar irregularities in the the lower edge of the pole pieces I5 on the rail
rails, while the shoe is in sliding contact with shoe at one side of the wheel truck will strike
the raised edge of the member I90 of the switch
the rail.
A guide stirrup or member 2| for each end of frog 35. As will be best seen in Fig. 4, the side
edge of the pole pieces l5 of the usual rail brake C1
the rail shoe H is provided, the members 2| be
ing suitably attached to the side frame [2 of the shoe is perpendicular to the surface of the rail
wheel truck. The upper portion of the rail shoe ?ange and thus the rail shoe will be diverted
i! extends between opposite guiding faces of the laterally along the edge of the member I90 of
the switch frog in the direction of the main track
guide member 2 I, the width of the rail shoe be
ing less than the distance between the guide faces rails [90. without being able to ride up and over 10
in order to enable a limited lateral rocking move; 'jthe projecting edge of the member I90.
ment of the rail shoe whereby the shoe may
I have found that even. though the angle of
adjust itself to irregularities in the surface of- - inclination with respect to the track rails of the
the ?ange of the rail and’ maintain maximum usual bevel l8 at the end of the rail shoes is
15
area of contact therewith.a
.
,
' ' ,‘
;. decreased from the usual angle and even though
15
The rail shoe H is lowered into contact with theside edges of the usual bevel are rounded off,
the track rail l9 and raised out of contact there
the rail brake shoe cannot ride up and over the
from by suitable means, such as the two-lifting ' projecting edge of the member I90, if the member
cylinders 23 shown, which are attachedforl I90 of vthe switch frog projects an appreciable
distance above the top ?ange of the main track 20
20 mounted, as by mounting lugs 24, to ‘transverse
struts or members 25 which extend between the rail l9a. '
side frames l2 at ‘opposite sides‘ of the wheel
According to my invention, I have accordingly
truck. When ?uid under pressure is supplied to provided specially devised “skid blocks” 38, shown
each of the cylinders 23, as through a supply in detail in Figs. 6 and 7 which may be applied
to existing rail shoes of the usual type to convert 25
25 pipe 26, a piston (not shown) within the cylin
ders is shifted upwardly and causes a correspond
them into ‘shoes capable of riding over the raised
ing shifting of a stem or rod 21. One end of the
edge "of a member of a switch frog and thereby
to prevent severe damage to the rail brake equip
ment.
It will be understood that while my invention 30
site end of the shoe‘is similarly supported or is illustrated in a form particularly applicable to
suspended by a pair of links 28 from theupper~ the conversion of existing rail brake shoes, it may
most end of the stem of the other cylinder. The readily be applied in principle in the initial man
links 28 are pivotally connected to brackets 2e u'facture of the rail shoes.
attached to the rail shoe II. The pivotal con
. As will be clearly apparent in Figs. 1 and 2 of 35
nection of the links 28 to the stem 21 and to the the drawings, the skid blocks are relatively short
brackets 29 is effected by means of bolts and nuts in lengthcompared to the total length of the rail
3! and springs 32, which serve to prevent chat
brake shoes, a skid block being attached to the
tering and also to permit a ?exible connection pole pieces 15 of the rail brake shoe in the angle
between the rail shoe and the lifting cylinders between the horizontal and vertical portions of 40
so that the shoe may adjust itself to ‘irregu
the pole pieces H5, at the four corners of the rail
larities in the surface of the rail' ?ange.‘
brake shoe.
With ?uid under pressure supplied through the
In order to provide proper seating for the skid
pipe 26 to the cylinders 23, the stems 21 are ‘blocks 38, the horizontal portions of the pole
held in a raised position so that the rail shoe is pieces l5 are provided with suitable recesses 4| 45
accordingly held in a raised position out of con
,(see Figs. 1 and 5) for receiving therein a corre
sponding projection 42 formed on one face of
tact with the track rails. When ?uid under pres
sure is released from the cylinders 23, the rail the skid block. Suitable screws 40 cooperating
shoe falls, due to its ownv weight, into contact with threaded bores 43 in the skid block and in
with the track rail. Current is supplied to the the pole pieces l5 serve to secure the skid blocks 50
electromagnet coils I1 and energization thereof 38 to the pole pieces I5.
As will be clearly apparent in Figs. 7 and 8,
effected in any suitable manner to effect the
magnetic attraction between the rail shoe and the side surface 5|] of the skid block 38 extends
laterally outward and upwardly from the rail
the track rail.
.
,
In Figs. 3 and 4 there ‘is shown a switch frog contacting surface of the vertical portions of the 56
35 for switching vehicles from the main line track pole pieces IS, the side surface curving inwardly
rails, designated as rails l9a, to side track rails, toward the track rail at the opposite ends of the
designated as rails l9b. If as is frequently the block 38.. While the side surfaces 50 are illus
trated as substantially straight, they may be
case, the main track rails settle vor the wear on
the ?ange of the main track rails I911 greatly curved if desired. The ends of the skid block 38
rail shoe II is pivotally suspended by‘ a pair of
links or struts 28 from the uppermost end of the
30 stem 21 of one lifting cylinder-23 and the oppo
35
45
55
60
exceeds the wear on the ?anges of the side track
are cut away or inclined to merge into and to
rails I92), due to the higher proportion of. tra?ic
conform to the angle of inclination of the bevel
l8 at the end of the rail brake shoe.
The inner edge of the skid block 38, as well as
the inner edge of the projection 42 on the skid
block, is beveled in order to insure proper ?tting
of the skid block in the angle between the hori
on the main track rails as compared to the traf?c
on the side track rails, the member l9c of the
65 switch frog which is moved into contact with the
main track rail I90. will eventually project above
the top surface of the ?ange of the main track
rails l9a.
In such case, with the switch'frog 35 in the
70 position shown in Figs. 3 and 4 ‘wherein it causes
the traf?c moving in the direction‘ of the arrow,
that is in the right-hand direction as viewed in
Fig. 3, to switch from the main track rails l?a.
to the side track rails [9b, 1 and with, the rail
75 shoe lowered into sliding contact with the rails,
zontal and vertical portions of the pole pieces l5,
which might be prevented by irregularities of the
?llet onthe pole pieces.
70
Referring to Fig.8, the manner in which the
skid block 38 functions will be readily under
stood.
The inwardly curved nose or end of the
skid block 38 which merges into the bevel H3
at the end of the rail shoe II will strike the 76
2,115,542
projecting or raised edge of the member I90
of the switch frog 35 and, acting as a wedge,
will tend to raise the rail brake shoe, against
the magnetic force of attraction tending to hold
the rail shoe in contact with the rail.
Should
the rail brake shoe tend to be diverted laterally
by the raised edge of the member I90‘, the side
surface of the member I90, acting as a wedge,
will cause the rail shoe to be raised so as to
10 slide over the projecting edge of the member
I90.
the
Fig.
lQb
Accordingly, the rail brake shoes will follow
car wheels, indicated by broken lines in
3, in the direction of the side track rails
instead of being diverted along the main
15 track rails 19a.
'
While I have illustrated and described only
one embodiment of my invention, it will be
understood that various modi?cations, omissions
or additions may be made with respect to the
20 embodiment of my invention shown, without de
parting from the spirit of my invention. It is
accordingly not my intention to limit the scope
of my invention except as it is necessitated by
the scope of the prior art and otherwise than
as de?ned in the appended claims.
Having now described my invention, what I
travel of the shoe when the shoe is in contact
with the rail.
4. A rail brake shoe for a vehicle, comprising 5
a rail-contacting member adapted to be disposed
perpendicularly to the rail in alignment there
with, and two detachable members secured re
spectively on opposite sides of said rail-contact
ing member adjacent the end thereof, each of 10
said detachable members having a side surface
extending laterally outward and upwardly from
the rail-contact surface of the rail-contacting
member and curved laterally inward at the end
of the shoe toward the rail-contacting member, 15
the surfaces on said detachable members en
abling the brake shoe to over-ride obstructions
in the line of travel of the shoe when the shoe
is in contact with the rail.
5. Protective means for preventing injury to 20
vehicle rail brake shoes, which injury would
otherwise occur due to the brake shoe striking
obstructions in the path of the shoe when low
ered to the rail and failing to over-ride such
obstructions, comprising means at opposite sides
of the brake shoe at one end thereof providing
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters
a surface which extends for a portion of the
Patent, is:
length of the shoe laterally outward and up
wardly from the rail-contact surface of the
brake shoe and which curves laterally inward 30
adjacent the end of the brake shoe.
6. Protective means for preventing injury to
1. A rail brake shoe for a vehicle, comprising
30 a rail-contacting member, and means on said
member having a forwardly inclined surface
curved laterally outward from the end of the
member and a surface extending longitudinally
for a portion of the length of the shoe as well
as laterally outward and upwardly from the
rail-contact surface of the rail-contacting mem
her, into which the said curved surface merges.
2. A rail brake shoe for a vehicle, comprising
a rail-contacting member which extends longi
40 tudinally of the rails and is of substantially rec
tangular shape, and means at each of the four
corners of said member having a forwardly in
clined surface curved laterally outward from the
end of said member and a surface extending
45 longitudinally for a portion of the length of the
shoe as well as laterally outward and upwardly
from the rail'contact surface of the rail-contact
ing member, into which the said curved surface
50
3
said surfaces on said means enabling the brake
shoe to over-ride obstructions in the line of
vehicle rail brake shoes, which injury would
otherwise occur due to failure of the brake shoe
to over-ride obstructions in the path of the shoe
when lowered to the rail, comprising means at
opposite sides of the brake shoe and at each
end thereof providing a surface which extends
laterally outward and upwardly from the rail
contact surface of the brake shoe and which 40
curves laterally inward adjacent the correspond
ing end of the shoe.
7. A rail brake shoe for a vehicle, comprising
a rail-contacting member adapted to be disposed
perpendicularly to and in alignment with the 45
track rail and having surfaces at opposite ends
thereof inclined forwardly relative to the sur
face of the rail, and means on one side of the
merges.
rail-contacting member adjacent one end of the
3. A rail brake shoe for a vehicle, comprising
a rail-contacting member adapted to- be disposed
perpendicularly of the rail in alignment there
shoe providing a surface which extends for a 50
portion of the length of the shoe laterally out
ward and upwardly from the rail-contact sur
face of the rail-contacting member and which
curves laterally inward at the end thereof adja
cent the end of the brake shoe toward the rail 55
with, and means on opposite sides of the rail
contacting member at one end thereof having
55 a side surface which extends laterally outward
and upwardly from the rail~contact surface of
the rail-contacting member, which side surface
curves laterally inward adjacent the end of the
shoe toward the rail-contacting member, the
contacting member, the curved portion of said
surface merging into the forwardly inclined sur
face at the end of the rail-contacting member.
CARL W. SMITH.
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