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Патент USA US2115798

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May 3, 193s.
J. H. BQYE
CURTAIN FIXTURE
2,115,798
`
Filed Jan. 30, 1956
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6624 E1
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Patented May 3, 1938
2,115,798
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,115,798
CURTAIN FIXTURE
James H. Boye, Chicago, Ill.
Application January 30, 1936, Serial No. 61,454
'l Claims. (C‘l. 156-19)
This invention relates to the art of curtain fix
tures, and has reference more particularly to ñx- '
tures of the crane type. In order to make such
fixtures adjustable as to length, a practice has
5 arisen oi equipping the main crane bar with an
extension arm in telescopic engagement therewith.
And since windows served by crane fixtures vary
in width,_usually from 28 to 60 inches, it has
heretofore been the general practice among
10 manufacturers to provide extensible cranes in at
least two sizes, one having a reach of from 14 to 21
inches, and the other a reach of from 18 to 30
inches.
These sizes of windows and cranes are
given, of course, only as examples, and may vary
15 according to other and different window widths.
This practice has required the retailer to carry
two stocks of the same style, occasionally causing
mistakes in the filling of an order; and further
more, in the case of two part extensible cranes the
20 extension of the crane to its maximum length left
it weak and unable to carry the curtain load with
out bending or sagging, thus creating an unsightly
eifect.
Accordingly, one important object of this in
25 vention has been to provide an extensible crane
capable of adjustment between the minimum
reach of the small size heretofore used and the
maximum reach of the large size heretofore used,
thus relieving the dealer of the necessity of carry
inner end of the inner extension member; to pro
vide means for limiting the movement of the inner
curtain ring on the crane and preventing it from
striking the crane supporting bracket; to provide
improved means for removably locking the outer 5
curtain ring at the outer end portion of the crane.
Still other objects and attendant advantages
of the invention will be apparent to persons skilled
in the art from the following detailed description,
taken in connection with the accompanying draW- 10
ing in which I have illustrated a practical embodi
ment of the invention well adapted to effectuate
the stated purposes and objects thereof, and
wherein:
Fig. 1 is a front elevation of the upper right 15
hand portion of a window frame showing one of
a mating pair of my improved cranes mounted
thereon, and also showing the upper portion of
a curtain suspended on the crane.
Fig. 2 is a top plan view, partly in section on 20
line 2_2 of Fig. 1. `
Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical lon
gitudinal section on line: 3_3 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical lon
gitudinal section on line 4_4 of Fig. 2.
25
Fig. 5 is a transverse vertical section on line
5_5 of Fig. 3.
Fig. 6 is a transverse vertical section on line
6_6 of Fig. 3.
.
30 ing two sizes of the same style in stock and the
Fig. "I is a transverse vertical section on line 30
confusion sometimes occurring in filling orders;
and another important object has been to provide
1_1 of Fig. 4.
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary horizontal longitudinal
section through telescoped parts of the outer and
inner extension sleeves, showing a modiñcation of
35
the frictionizing means.
a crane having a wide range of adjustment as to
length that would avoid the weakness referred to
' and possess ample strength and rigidity to carry
the curtain load without bending or sagging.
These objects are attained primarily by employ
ing a three part telescopic structure wherein the
parts are of such form and structure as to afford
40 maximum mutual reinforcement and rigidity.
Other objects of the invention are; to provide
three piece telescopic crane wherein the fric
ticnal grip of the inner or intermediate extension
W Ul
member on the crane bar will be greater than the
frictional grip of the outer extension member on
the inner or intermediate member, so as to per
mit the drawing out of the outer member without
disturbing the position of the inner member; to
provide new and improved means for yieldably
50 locking and frictionizing the inner extension
member on. the crane bar; to provide new and im
proved means for frictionizing the outer extension
member on the inner extension member; to pro
vide means for preventing the inner end of the
outer extension member from overrunning the
Fig. 9 is a vertical transverse section on line
9_9 of Fig. 8.
Referring to the drawing, Il! designates a
bracket of horizontal U-shape that is attached to
the window frame at its upper and lower ends, the 40
upper and lower limbs thereof being apertured to
receive the pivot shank II of the main crane bar
I2. This is preferably a solid metal bar of rec
tangular form in cross section as shown in Fig. 6.
Telescoping over the bar I2 is an inner extension 45
arm in the form of a sleeve I3, at the inner end
of the botto-m Wall of which is an indented spring
tongue I4 that, in the innermost position of the
sleeve I3 is adapted to snap into a recess I5 in
the bottom wall of the bar I2, whereby the sleeve 50
I3 is yieldably locked in its innermost position.
Telescoping over the inner sleeve i3 is an outer
extension arm in the form of a sleeve I B. The top
walls of the sleeves I3 and I6 are longitudinally
slotted as shown in Figs. 2 and '7.
2
2,115,798
When the inner sleeve I3 is drawn outwardly,
of the ornament on the bar and also provide a
the tongue I4 frictionizes on the bottom of the
bar I 2, and to create a similar friction between the
outer and inner sleeves the side walls of the inner
sleeve are formed with outwardly pressed pro
form a shallow recess 32 in the top of the bar I2
tuberances I‘I (Fig. ‘7) that, under the natural
spring of the side walls of the inner sleeve create
a frictional drag on the side walls of the outer
sleeve. In lieu of the protuberances I'I, the side
10 walls of the inner sleeve may be formed with op
posed slots I8 (Figs. 8 and 9) through which ex
tend outwardly bent portions I 9 of a spring 20
that is housed within the inner sleeve, the pro
tuberances I9 having a frictional bearing on the
15 side walls of the outer sleeve.
When the tongue I4 is engaged with the re- „
cess I5 as shown in Fig. 3, the grip of the inner
sleeve on the main crane bar is greater than the
grip of the outer sleeve on the inner sleeve, so
20 that, when the parts are fully telescoped, and the
outer sleeve is drawn outwardly it slides over the
.inner sleeve without drawing the latter outward
ly, and if an extension of the crane to an extent
requiring both sleeves is desired, the inner sleeve
can then be drawn outwardly to the required ex
tent, as is indicated in Fig. 1.
Referring to Fig. 4, in the bottom wall of the
outer sleeve IG is an upwardly struck lug 2l which
acts as a stop against the outer end of the inner
limiting stop for the inner curtain ring 26', I
rearwardly or inwardly of the rivet 3l, and this
recess 32 seats the lower end of a depending limb 5
33 on the lower edge of the ornament, so that the
curtain ring 26’ is confined between the shank
and the limb 33 of the ornament against sliding
in either direction over the crane bar as well as
against striking against the bracket I0.
10
ì From the foregoing it will be apparent that my
invention provides a curtain crane adapted to
serve relatively narrow and wide windows and all
sizes between the narrowest and the widest by
merely extending or contracting the telesooping
members of the crane, and the described devices
for restraining the outer and inner rings of the
curtain from sliding movement on the crane
cause the curtain itself to automatically follow
the adjustments of the crane. If the length of 20
crane desired for a window can be served by the
crane bar and the outer sleeve, the latter may
be merely drawn out to the extent required with
out disturbing the inner or yieldably locked posi
tion of the inner sleeve; whereas, if the window
width requires the use of both of the extension
sleeves, the outer sleeve may be first drawn out
25
to approximately the extent indicated in Fig. l,
and the additional length required is obtained by
30 sleeve i3 to prevent the inner end of the outer
sleeve from overrunning the inner end of the
inner sleeve. rI‘he primary reason for this stop
then drawing out the inner sleeve. The con 30
struction is strong and sturdy and well adapted
lug is to prevent the inner end of the outer slee-ve
from striking the base or shank of an ornament,
35 hereinafter referred to, that is mounted on top of
the main bar I2 adjacent to the pivot of the
latter, since, repeated striking of the inner end of
the outer sleeve against the ornament would in
alignment, and manifestly the curtain may be
readily adjusted to overhang more or less of the
time form an inwardly directed lip or 'our that
40 would collide with the inner end of the inner
sleeve and thus prevent the outward movement
of the outer sleeve on the inner sleeve.
22 designates a cast metal ornament that is
mounted on the main bar I2 near its pivot, and
45 23 designates a smaller ornament that is mount
ed on the outer end of the outer sleeve; such or
naments being customarily used on the prevail~
ing style of curtain cranes. As shown best in
Fig. 4, the ornament 23 is cast with a shank 2d
50 that is driven into the outer end of the outer
sleeve I5, and on the upper side of the shank 24
is an upstanding lug 25 that projects through
to maintain the two cranes in accurate horizontal
outer side portions of the window by simply rais 35
ing the outer ring 26 over the'y stop lug 25 and then
sliding the curtain rings along the crane.
While I have herein shown and described prac
tical mechanical embodiments of the several
novel structural features of the crane that have,
in practice, been found to satisfactorily eiîectuate
the stated purposes and objects thereof, it is
manifest that detail changes and modiñcations
may be resorted to within the principle of the
invention, and hence I reserve all such variations,
, modifications and mechanical equivalents as fall
1. An extensible curtain crane, comprising a
bar having a pivot member at one end thereof, an
50
inner sleeve telescoping over said bar, an outer
sleeve telescoping over said inner sleeve, means
creating a frictional drag of said inner sleeve on
said bar, and means creating a lesser frictional
drag of said outer sleeve on said inner sleeve.
55
2. In an extensible curtain crane, the combina
tion with a crane bar having a recess in a wall
The larger ornament 22 is mounted on the crane
thereof, of an extension sleeve telescoping over
the bar.
As best shown in Figs. 3 and 5, the top
surface of the bar I 2 is formed with a longitu
dinal shallow V-shaped groove 21, and the base
oi the ornament is formed with a longitudinal
65 tongue 23 that seats in the groove 27. Through
aligned holes 29 and 3% in the bar and shank of
the ornament is inserted a hot rivet 3|, the two
ends of which are then mashed down to form
heads, as shown in Fig. 3. When the rivet cools
70 it draws the two parts together at the tongue
and groove joint and makes a very solid, durable
construction, such that it is impossible for the
ornament to turn on the pivot and thus get out
of the vertical plane of the crane bar.
To still further maintain `the correct position
75
45,
within the spirit and purview of the claims.
I claim:
and above the slot in the top wall of the sleeve IS
and serves to catch and detain the last curtain
55 ring 25 when the curtain is fully stretched as
shown in Fig. 1. Of course, a similar lug might
be formed on the sleeve I6 itself, if desired.
bar I2 by means designed to very securely hold it
60 in place and maintain it in the vertical plane of
40
said bar, said sleeve having an integral spring
tongue engaged with said recess in the fully tele~ 60
scoped position of said sleeve to yieldably lock
said sleeve against outward movement, said
tongue exerting a frictional drag on said bar when
said sleeve is moved outwardly.
3. In an extensible curtain crane, the combinal 65
tion with a solid crane bar of rectangular cross
section having a recess in its bottom wall, of an
extension sleeve of like cross section telescoping
over said bar, said sleeve having on its bottom
Wall an integral spring tongue engaged with said
recess in the fully telescoped position of said
Sleeve to yieldably lock said sleeve against out
ward movement, said tongue exerting a frictional
drag on said bar when said sleeve is moved out
wardly.
75
2,115,798
4. In an extensible curtain crane, the combina
tion with a crane bar, of an inner sleeve telescop
ing over said bar, and an outer sleeve telescoping
over said inner sleeve, said inner sleeve having
opposed protuberances on the outer sides of side
Walls integral with the latter in frictional en
gagement with the corresponding Walls of said
outer sleeve.
5. In an extensible curtain crane, the combina
tion with a crane bar, of an inner sleeve telescop
ing over said bar, said sleeve having opposed slots
in the side Walls thereof, an outer sleeve tele
scoping over said inner sleeve, and a spring in
said inner sleeve having portions thereof extend
ing through said slots in frictional engagement
15 with the side walls of said outer sleeve.
6. In an extensible curtain crane, the combina
3
tion with a crane bar, of an inner sleeve telescop
ing over said bar, and an outer sleeve telescop
ing over said inner sleeve, said outer sleeve hav
ing an internal stop lug adapted to contact the
outer end of said inner sleeve to limit the extent
of inward movement of said outer sleeve on said
inner sleeve.
7. In a curtain crane, the combination With a
sleeve having a longitudinal slot in its top wall,
and curtain rings on said sleeve, of an ornament 10
having a shank driven into one end of said sleeve,
and an upstanding lugf on said shank projecting
through and above said slot, the portion of said
lug above said slot serving to engage and detain
an end curtain ring against sliding inwardly on 15
said sleeve.
JAMES H. BOYE.
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