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Патент USA US2115949

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May 3, 1938.
s GURBER
2,115,949
CONCRETE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Filed Sept. 4, 1956'
2'
'
5 Sheets-Sheet l
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May 3, 193%.
S. GURBER
2,1 159%
CONCRETE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Filed Sept. 4, 195” ‘
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
s. GURBER
'
'
2,1 1,%9
CONCRETE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Filed Sept. 4, 1936
5 Sheets-Shee’b 3
$4 415 Eh Km M4115
may 3, 193%
GURBER
2,115,949
CONCRETE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Filed Sept. 4, 1936
5 Sheets-Sheet 4
Mi Wm’. ?.
W9.
$4 is 321cm W15
May- 3, 1938.
s, GURBER
~ 2,115,949 '
CONCRETE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Filed Sept. 4, 1936
[Ff/g’. 7O
5 Sheets-Sheet 5'
2,115,94
Patented May 3, 1938
UNITED STATES ‘PATENT, OFFICE
2,115,949
CONCRETE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Samuel Gurber, West Tulsa, Okla.
Application September 4, 1936,. Serial No. 99,470
10 Claims. (Cl. 72—1)
This invention relates to improvements in con
crete building structures and particularly to a
novel form of concrete column for buildings of
diiferent types.
5
One object of the invention is to provide a
column construction which will facilitate the
placement of‘ ?oor or partition members.
Another object is to provide a column construc
tion wherein the floor, girder or cross-beam sup
10 porting portions of the column can be incorpor
ated in the building either at the time the building
is erected or subsequently.
Expressed in detail, the present column might
be said to be of a composite nature in that there
and combinations and arrangements of parts, all
as will hereinafter be more fully described and
the novel features thereof particularly pointed
out in the appended claims.
In the accompanying drawings-—
Figure l is an elevational view, illustrating dia
grammatically a corner portion of a building
erected according to the present invention;
Fig. 2 is a horizontal section on the line 2-2
10
of Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional View on the line
3—3 of Fig. 2;
Fig. 4 is a vertical, detail section on the line
4-4 of Fig. 3;
-
15 is a main column and a supplemental column
Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view illustrating
each composed of vertically disposed reinforced
a column in the exterior wall intermediate the
corner columns and a, so-called, interior column
concrete units with the units of each column
spaced one from the other. - The units of each
column are secured together by bolts or other
2
fastening members which project through the
spaces thus provided without interfering with
the metal reinforce bars, such fastening elements
protruding into recesses at opposite sides of the
columns to permit the attachment of nuts or the
like. Some of the bolts project through both the
main and supplemental columns and thus secure
the two columns together into the so-called com
posite structure. The main columns extend the
entire height of the building but the units of the
3 O supplemental columns terminate at the proper
elevations to support the girders or joists for the
?oors. By reason of the supplemental columns
being secured in place by bolts extending through
3
spaces in the main columns, such spaces being
formed at the time the main column is erected,
the supplemental columns can be installed at any
time subsequent to the erection of the main
column.
Another object is to- provide novel means for
40 tying the cross-beams or other horizontal struc
tural elements of the building into the columns.
A still further object is to erect a building of
multiple stories or floors in which the transverse
members or beams are offset laterally with respect
to one another toward the outer walls of the
structure with the beams of the upper ?oors or
stories located nearest said outer walls.
Another object is the provision of a novel con—
struction of interlocking means for superposed
50 sections of vertical sectional columns which will
permit transverse members such as girders to be
formed with a portion of said interlocking means
embedded therein.
With these and other objects in view, the in
vention consists in certain details of construction
for supporting a partition. beam;
Fig. 6 is a horizontal sectional view onv the line
6-—6 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 7 is a vertical view, illustrating diagram
matically the type of main column used in com
paratively high structures;
Figs. 8 and 9 are horizontal views illustrating
diagrammatically the cross-section of a corner
column and the disposition of the cross-beams
at two alternate floors of the structure illustrated
in Fig. 7 ;
,
Fig. 10 is a similar view illustrating the cross
section of the column and the disposition of the 3O
cross-beams at the ?oor intermediate the floors
illustrated in Figs. 8 and 9;
Fig. 11 is a diagrammatical illustration of the
cross-section of ‘an intermediate outer wall
column used in combination with the structures 35
of Figs. '7 to 10; and
Fig. 12' is a detail, longitudinal section of an end
portion of one of the column units.
The present column is of a composite nature
in that it is composed of one or more, so-called, 40
main columns and ‘one or more supplemental
columns. Both the main columns and the sup
plemental columns are formed of reinforced con
crete units, usually pre-cast, and secured together
during the erection of the building by suitable 45
ties or fastening members. For instance, as
shown in Fig. 2, a corner column comprises main
column units A, A’, B, B’, and the supplemental
columns S, S’, this being the preferred arrange
ment for buildings only a few stories high. Fig. 5
illustrates the construction of exterior columns
intermediate the corner of the building and in
terior columns used in partitions. The exterior
intermediate column, as shown, comprises main
column units A, A’, B, B’, and supplemental units 55
2
2,115,949
S, S’, at three sides thereof. Similarly, the in
terior column may consist of main column units
A, A’, B, B’, and supplemental units S, S’, at
opposite sides thereof for the purpose of support
ing cross-beams.
Each column unit is cut away at certain of its
corners, forming recesses 20 when the several
units are assembled in the column, and the sev
eral units of the column are spaced apart trans
versely to accommodate tie rods of fastening
members which pass through metal plates 2| in
said recess and securely hold the units together
in the column. Certain tie rods 22 (Fig. 3) ex
tend through only the main column composed of
15 units A, A’, B and B’, while other rods 23 are
longer and extend between the supplemental units
S, S’. Plates 2! extend the full height of the
column, and, if desired, individual plates 2|a may
also be provided at opposite ends of each rod.
20 By taking up on the nuts 24 on the various tie
rods, the various units of each column can be
securely fastened together. Preferably, tie rods
22 are also placed in the spaces between the
supplemental units and those of the main column.
25 With this arrangement, it is a very easy matter
to install additional supplemental column units
after the erection of the building. The spaces
between the main column units are, of course,
permanent, so that any time it is desired to in
30 stall additional units, either for new partitions
or otherwise, additional tie rods can be inserted
through the already erected columns to embrace
such new units.
In order to securely interlock cross-beams such
35 as illustrated at 25, in Figs. 1 and 5, with the
units of the main columns, and at the same time
provide reinforcing means for said cross-beams,
elongated tie rods or reinforce bars 26 are em
bedded in the cross-beam, but with their ends
exposed for anchoring attachment to said col
umns. Referring particularly to Figs. 2 to 5, this
attachment consists of plates 21 threaded on the
ends of bar 26 against a nut 28 and said plates
are provided with apertures for reception of the
protruding ends of rods 22. If desired, washers
29 may be provided on each of the rods between
plates 2i’ and 2| and plates 27 are secured on
rods 22 by nuts 24. In erecting the building, the
nuts 28 are ?rst threaded on rod 26, followed by
placement of plates 21 and washers 29 thereon.
The ends of rod 26 are then placed in openings
in plate 2! with rods 22 inserted in openings in
plate 2?, after which nuts 24 are threaded on
the rods 22. Rod 26 can then, if necessary, be
properly tensioned by means of the turnbuckle
25’ (Fig. 1). With the rod 26 thus securely held
in position, the cross-beam is poured in a suit
able form so arranged that the beam will be sup
ported on the upper surfaces of the supplemental
60 column units S, S’.
A modi?ed cross-section for the column units
is illustrated in Fig. 6. In this instance, the units
are formed with longitudinally extending ribs 3|
having undercut side faces.
The units are as
(i5 sembled in the usual spaced relation with ribs
3! opposed and V-shaped plates 32 placed to
engage the undercut side faces of the opposed
ribs. Tie bolts 22a are then inserted through
openings in the plates and nuts applied to both
ends of said bolts at opposite sides of the op
posed ribs. If desired, additional plates 33 can
be provided between plates 32 and the undercut
surfaces of the ribs.
For the purpose of securing superimposed units
75 in a column, said units may each be provided
with a socket 34 at one end and with an em
bedded, longitudinally extending bar 35 of su?i
cient length to project beyond the opposite end
of the unit. When one unit is placed endwise
upon another, the lower unit has the projecting
rod 35 at its upper extremity and said rod is
positioned in the socket of the other or upper
unit. Thus, transverse displacement of the su
perimposed units is prevented. Preferably, the
sockets 34 are lined with a short length of pipe. 10
It will be understood that the so-called main
columns composed of superimposed units A, A’,
B, B’ extend the full height of the building, but
the supplemental column units S, S’ terminate
at each floor level or any other point at which 15
some horizontal structural element of the build
ing is .to be supported. It will also be appreci
ated that any number of reinforce elements or
rods may be incorporated in the individual units
and their presence will not interfere with the tie 20
bolts 22, 23, because of the transverse spacing of
the units in the column.
In erecting a multi-storied structure of any
appreciable height, the arrangement of corner
columns and cross-beams shown more or less 25
diagrammatically in Figs. 7 to 11, may be used.
This arrangement consists in assembling a plu
rality of the multi-unit columns at each corner of
the building and at suitable points intermediate
the corners, the several units of each column be 30
ing tied together as previously described. A
corner column is shown in Fig. 8 and an inter
mediate column in Fig. 11. The pre-cast beams
25 are secured in place as described, but at each
of two opposite sides of each floor, two beams are 35
used as shown, one beam being located ?ush
with the outer faces of the columns and the other
s'paced "inwardly therefrom. However, as the
height of the building increases, the inner beams
are located comparatively close to the outer 40
beams. For instance, Fig. 8 represents the loca
tion of the beams at one side of the building at
the ?fth ?ooor of the structure illustrated in
Fig. '7, and Fig. 9 illustrates the beams at the sixth
floor of the building. Fig. 10 indicates the beams 45
as placed in the walls for the seventh ?oor, that
is, the double beam arrangement is used at two
opposite sides on one ?oor and at the other two
opposite sides on the next succeeding ?oor. It is,
of course, not necessary that the inner beams 50
of each two alternate floors be offset with respect
to each other. For instance, as indicated by the
thickness of the corner column in Fig, 7, the inner
beams of the third and ?fth ?oors may be in the
same vertical plane, as would also be those of the 65
second and fourth, the initial offsetting taking
place at the sixth floor.
What I claim is:
1. A concrete column construction composed
of vertically disposed units, each unit being spaced 60
from the other, the contiguous corners of each
pair of juxtaposed units being cut away and
forming vertically extending recesses in the sides
of said column, plates in said recesses, and trans
verse fastening members located in and extending 65
through the spaces between said units and
through said plates for securing said units to
gether.
2. A concrete column construction for build
ings comprising a main column composed of ver
tically disposed units extending the height of the
70
building, means for securing said units together,
and a supplemental column composed of verti
cally disposed units terminating substantially at
adjacent ?oor levels, said supplemental column 75
3
2,115,949
being secured to the main column, and means for
securing the supplemental column units together.
3. A concrete column construction for buildings
composed of vertically disposed units extending
substantially the height of the building, a sup
plemental column composed of vertically disposed
units terminating substantially at the floors- of
the building, the units of said main and supple
mental columns being spaced one from the others,
10 and transversely extending bolts: in the spaces
between the units for securing the units. of the
individual columns together, a portion of said
bolts extending through both columns to secure
the main and supplemental columns together.
4. A concrete column construction for buildings
15
comprising a main column composed of verti
cally disposed units each spaced from the other,
a supplemental column composed of vertically dis
posed units spaced from each other, said main
and supplemental columns having alined spaces,
reinforce elements extending longitudinally with
in each unit, and fastening elements extending
transversely through said spaces for securing the
units of the individual columns together and for
25 securing the two columns to each other.
5. In a concrete structure, the combination of
a plurality of concrete columns at each corner of
said structure, cross~beams for each story of said
structure supported on at least one column at
30 each of two of said corners, each beam supporting
column terminating at the level of the beam sup
ported thereon, the beams of the several stories
at each side of said structure being oifset in a
horizontal plane relatively to one another, the
beams of the upper stories being o?set outwardly
of the structure relatively to» the beams of the
lower floors.
6. In a concrete structure, the combination of
a plurality of concrete columns each composed of
40 a plurality of vertically disposed, laterally spaced
units, tie rods extending through said spaces se
curing the units of each column together, a por
tion of said tie rods extending through a plu
rality of said columns to secure the same together,
45 cross-beams for each story of the structure sup
ported on at least one column at each of two
corners of the structure, the beams of the several
stories being o?‘set laterally of one another toward
the outer Walls of the structure with the beams
of the upper story located nearer said outer walls
than the beams of the lower stories.
7. In concrete building construction, the com
bination of two main columns spaced longitudi
nally of the building wall, a supplemental column
associated with each main column, a cross beam
supported on said supplemental columns, metal
rods extending transversely of each of said main 10
columns, plates secured to the rods of each of said
main columns, and a metallic reinforce member
extending longitudinally of said beam and secured
adjacent its ends in said plates.
8. In concrete building construction, the com 15
bination of two main columns spaced longitudi
nally of the building wall, each column being com
posed of a plurality of transversely spaced units,
tie rods extending through the spaces of each
column for securing the units thereof together, 20
plates secured to the tie rods of each column, a
supplemental column associated with each of said
main columns, a cross-beam supported on said
supplemental columns, and a reinforce member
extending through said beam. and having its 25
opposite ends secured to the plates on said main
columns.
,
9. A concrete column construction composed of
vertically
disposed
preformed units
spaced
laterally from one another, opposed ribs on juxta 30
posed faces of said units, the side vertical edges
of said ribs being undercut, a V-shaped plate
engaging the corresponding side edges of said
opposed ribs at each side of said ribs, and a tie
rod positioned in the space between said units 35
and secured in the plates at both sides of said ribs.
10. A concrete column. construction composed
of a plurality of vertically disposed units, said
column having openings extending transversely
therethrough, said openings ' being formed by 40
spacing the units laterally from each other,
fastening elements positioned in the openings and
between the units with their ends projecting at
opposite sides of the units, and means on said
elements at opposite sides of the column for se 45
curing the said units together.
SAMUEL GURBER.
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