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Патент USA US2116187

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May 3, 1938.
'
I
l. CHESLER
2,116,187
LEAD PENCIL AND METHOD 0-?‘ PREPARING PENCIL LEADS
Filed Aug. 14, 1935
INVENTOR
ATTORNEYS
-
Patented May 3, 1938
27,116,187 ‘
* UNITED “STATES PATENT or-frics
2,116,187
LEAD PENCILS AND METHOD OF PREPAB- '
'
ING PENCIL LEQDS
.
Isidor Chesler, West Orange, N. 1., assignor to
Eagle Pencil Company, a corporation of Del
aware
Application August 14, 1935,.Serial No. 38,155
14 Claims. (Cl. 120-83)
My present invention relates to pencils and
pencil leads, and is more particularly concerned
with the secure bonding of the leads into the
wooden sheaths of pencils of generally conven
5
tional appearance.
‘
>
An object of the invention is to provide a lead
of appropriate writing specifications, the surface
of which, unlike that of a lead merely impreg
nated in the ordinary non-water-soluble oils or
do greases, has a surface miscible with water-solu
apt to stick together, and are ready to be assem- '
bled and glued between the segments of a wooden
pencil casing.
,
' \
5
It is distinctly to be understood that the in
vention relates to applying the wettingland pence
trating agent to the lead after the latter has
been completely formed and calcined so that the
wetting and penetrating agent is present 'as such, 10
ble glue and, therefore, capable of being bonded
to perform its function of affording asurface
with respect thereto.
miscible with water soluble glue to assure ade
quacy of bond. Where a soap or sulphonated oil
in introduced into the mix from which the lead
'
Another object is to provide a method requir
ing no elaborate apparatus or expert care and
15 expeditiouslycarried out at small cost for pro
ducing the desired leads.
In carrying out the invention, use is, made of
a wetting and penetrating agent, preferably a
sulphonated oil or grease, or, if desired, a sul-.
phonated petroleum, fatty alcohol or naphthol,
which,v being readily miscible with the water
soluble glue commonly employed in encasing the
lead in the wooden sheath, will afford a secure
bond.
25
lead from the surplus oil or grease. The surfaces
of the leads having been thus cleaned,-are not
In a preferred embodiment, the wetting and
penetrating agent partly. or wholly replaces the
usual non-water-soluble waxes, oils or greases,
is fabricated, it, is apparent that in the subse- 15
quent calcining ‘action such e?icacy as such ma
terial might otherwise have for miscibility of wa
ter soluble glue would be destroyed and regard
less of what other improvements the introduction
of such elements into the mix’might bring about, 20
the particular utility of the present invention
would not be attained.
-
In the accompanying drawing, in which is
‘shown one of various possible embodiments of
the several features of the drawing, 25
- Fig. 1 is a dis-assembled view showing a pen
cil lead about to be assembled in its sheath, and '
’ Fig. 2 is an enlarged transverse sectional view
employed in, impregnating leads. Of‘ course,
where such agent wholly replaces the oil or grease through the completely assembled pencil.
30 usually employed in leads, it must have appropri
The lead It! with sulphonated oil or grease 30
ate speciflcations to duplicate insofar as possible,
‘penetrating or at least at the surface thereof .is
the writing characteristics of such waxes, greases covered by the glue coating I! .which bonds it
or oils. Where, however, mixtures are employed to blocks ll of wood, that are glued together
of non-water-soluble oils or greases and of the
along the contacting surface thereof.
'
35 wetting and penetrating agent, such as sul
It will thus beseen that there is herein de- 35
phonated oils or greases, it is obvious that the
characteristics of each ingredient may be so se
lected as to produce a blend of any desired char
acterlstic, for hardness or softness of the lead,
40 and the wetting and penetrating ingredient, if in
sumcient proportion will render the lead satis
factory from the standpoint of adhesiveness with
respect to the glue.
,
In a simple method of carrying out the process,
45 the wetting and penetrating agent, preferably
sulphonated oil or grease, or the blend including
sulphonated oil or grease, is heated suiliciently to
maintain the solution at low viscosity-/ Prefer
ably unwaxed, or if desired, previoifsly waxed
50 leads placed in baskets, are submerged in the
bath and left for a’ sufficient period of time to
insure complete penetration. After removal of
the leads from the bath, they are allowed to drip
for a short while and then tumbled in heated
55 sawdust, which serves to clean the'surface of the
scribed an article and method in which the sev
eral features of this invention are embodied, and
which in practice, attain the various objects of
the invention and are well suited to meet ~the_re-.
_ quirements of practical use.
>
40
As many changes could be made in the above
article and method, and many apparently widely
different embodiments of this invention could be
made without departing from the scope hereof, it 45
is intended that all matter contained in the
above description or shown in the accompanying
drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and
not in a limiting sense.
'
Having thus described my invention, what I
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters"
'Patent is:
‘
1. A calcined lead of graphite and binder, hav
ingv its interstices ?lled with a; grease-wetting
and penetrating agent, capable of effecting an 55
2
2,116,187
adequate bond with respect to a water‘ soluble ting and penetrating agent, removing the baskets
glue.
and allowing the leads to drip, and then tumbling
2. A pencil lead of calcined graphite and' them in heated sawdust.
binder, impregnated throughout the mass thereof
9. The method of preparing pencil leads. which
with an appropriate softening agent of the class
consists
in submerging leads, retained in baskets
which includes certain waxes and oils to impart in a molten
composition including a softening
the desired degree of softness, and impregnated agent of the class which includes certain waxes
also with a softening and wetting agent ofsthe and oils and a material of the class that includes
class which includes sulphonated oil, sulphonated sulphonated oil and sulphonated grease, remov
10 grease, sulphonated fatty alcohol and sulphonated ing the baskets and allowing the leads to drip,
naphthol, to afford a bonding surface for gluing and tumbling them in heated sawdust.
lead into the wooden sheath.
10. A pencil lead including pigment and binder
3. A lead pencil of the ‘type comprising a lead, andhaving incorporated therein, ‘a material of
a wooden sheath and a glue bond- between the lead the class comprising sulphonated fatty alcohol
15 and the sheath, the lead having an impregnation and sulphonated naphthol.
'
.
throughout the mass thereof of a softening agent
11. A calcined, lead of graphite and binder,
of the class which includes certain waxes and having
its interstices filled with a material of the
oils and also with a grease wetting and penetrat
class comprising sulphonated fatty alcohol and
ing agent capable of effecting an adequate bond sulphonated
naphthol, and capable of eii'ecting an
20 of the glue with respect to the lead.
adequate bond with respect to a water soluble
4. A lead pencil of the type comprising a lead, ' Blue.
a wooden sheath and a glue bond between the
12. A lead pencil of the type comprising a lead
lead and the sheath, the lead having an impreg
nation of grease-wetting and penetrating agent,
for adequate bond of the glue with respect thereto.
5. A lead pencil of the type comprising a lead
of’ graphite and ?ller, impregnated with a soften
ing agent of the class which includes certain
waxs and oils, a wooden sheath, a layer of glue
30 between the sheath and the lead, the lead having
at the surface thereof a grease wetting and pene
trating agent mixed with said grease wetting and
penetrating agent for adequate bond with respect
to the glue.
86
‘
6. The method of preparing a pencil lead,
which consists in admixing graphite and clay,
extruding the material through dies, calcining
the product and then impregnating the same in
a sulphonated grease-wetting and penetrating
agent, to afford the desired degree of softness and
at the same time to provide a surface capable
of making an adhesive bond with water soluble
adhesive.
'
7. The method of preparing a pencil lead,
which consists in admixing graphite and clay,
extruding the material through dies, calcining
the product and then impregnating the same with
a material of the class that includes sulphonated
oil and sulphonated grease, to afford the desired
50 degree of softness and at the same time to provide
a surface capable of taking an adhesive bond
with water soluble adhesive.
8. The method of preparing pencil leads, which
consists in submerging leads, retained in baskets
55 in a molten composition including a grease-wet
of graphite and filler, impregnated with a soften
ing agent of the class which includes certain
waxes and oils, a wooden sheath, a layer of glue
between the sheath and the lead, the lead having 25
at the surface thereof in addition to said soften
ing agent, a grease wetting and penetrating agent,
said agent being of the class comprising sul
phonated fatty alcohol and sulphonated naphthol
and serving for adequate bond with respect to the
glue.
13. The method of preparing a pencil lead,
which consists in admixing graphite and clay,
extruding the material through dies, calcining the
product and then impregnating the same in a 35
softening agent of the class which includes cer
tain waxes and oils and a softening and wetting
agent of the class which includes sulphonated oil,
sulphonated grease, sulphonated fatty alcohol
and sulphonated naphthol, to afford the desired 40
degree of softness and at the same time to pro
vide a surface capable of taking an adhesive bond
with water soluble adhesive.
14. The method of preparing pencil leads,
which consists in submerging the leads, retained
in baskets in a molten composition including a
softening agent of the class which includes cer
tain waxes and oils and a material of the class
that includes sulphonated oil and sulphonated
grease, removing the baskets and allowing the
leads to drip, and tumbling them in heated
sawdust.
ISIDOR CHESLER.
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