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Патент USA US2116445

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May 3, 1938.
‘
v. L. MOORE
2,116,445
ARTICLE OF FOOTWEAR
Filed Dec. 18, 1937
£295
'
INYENTOR
y/da Li Moore
BY
,
‘
2,116,445
Patented May 3, 1938
tlJNlTED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,116,445
ARTICLE OF FOOTWEAR
Vida L. Moore, New York, N. Y.
Application December 18, 1937, Serial No. 180,518
r
In Great Britain April 29, 1937
(Cl. 36-71)
3 Claims.
Furthermore, in many cases the metatarsals
which are replaced in their natural positions by
raising the cuneiform, tend to become stronger
during the continued use of the device and thus‘
it is desirable that the pressure on the cuneiform
be somewhat lessened with a view to ultimately
This invention relates to articles of foot wear,
such as boots, shoes and sandals.
‘
Many of the articles of foot wear now avail
able have bad effects on the wearer’s feet due to
5 the particular last upon which the shoes are built,
or to faulty design, and also due to defects in the
wearer’s feet, such as displaced bones, joints or
muscles.
dispensing entirely with the support.
This invention has for one of its objects to pro
vide an article of foot wear having means con
.
Furthermore, the modern tendency for outdoor
structed and arranged to support the cuneiform 10
10 sports such as golf, tends to cause various foot
troubles due to the strain placed upon the
and to relieve the pressure on the metatarsals and
muscles, ligaments and joints of the feet and
to prevent displacement thereof.
ankles. Also, as is well known, the high heels
used in women’s shoes tend to strain the muscles
Another object of the invention is to provide
foot wear with adjustable means for supporting
the cuneiform, so arranged that it can be ad
just-ed to meet the conditions encountered.
and joints of the feet.
More speci?cally, one of the most serious de
fects is due to the displacement of the metatarsal
and cuneiform bones of the foot causing what is
generally known as fallen arch. This may be due
to
various reasons, including those given above
20
and in order to overcome this trouble the cunei
form and metatarsal bones must be raised and
Another object of the invention is to provide
an article of foot wear having means for sup
porting the metatarsal arch and cuneiform. so
constructed and arranged as to provide for pro- 20
gressive adjustment to gradually correct defects
and bring the cuneiform and metatarsals back to.
the correct position.
Another object of the invention is to provide
retained in raised position, especially at those
times when the wearer of the foot wear is exer
N Ci cising strenuously, or the weight of the wearer is
borne on the foot. In some cases it is necessary
for the wearer to constantly use means for sup
an article of foot wear with means so designed
and so secured in the foot wear as to exert an
upward and rearward lift on the cuneiform, thus
not only supporting the arch, but returning the
porting and raising the arch or cuneiform and
metatarsal bones.
As is well known, if the cuneiform and meta
tarsal bones which form the connection and arch
deformed or displaced cuneiformvand metatarsal
bones to their correct positions.
Further objects of the invention will appear
from the following speci?cation taken in con
nection with the drawing which forms a part of
this application, and in which
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a shoe having 35
connected thereto and embodied therein means
constructed in accordance with the invention for
correcting and supporting the cuneiform and
between the heel and the toes are raised and sup
ported the strain on the foot and the consequen
tial metatarsal displacement will be avoided and
defects in the foot will be compensated for.
Various devices have been proposed for accom
plishing the desired purpose of raising and sup
porting the cuneiform bones, such for instance, as
arch supporters which are inserted in the shoe
metatarsal bones of the foot;
40 or boot and are of rigid material and so shaped
as to force the cuneiform bones upwardly and
retain them in this position. However, such de
vices have certain distinct disadvantages. For
instance, they tend to slip and chafe when stren
low shoe;
and 2;
sightly in certain types of shoes which have parts
cut away to display the wearer's stockings.
Moreover, with such prior devices and arrange
for instance, when the feet swell. Under such
conditions and with arch supporters of the type
described, there is no way of relieving the tension
or pressure caused upon the cuneiform and thus
55 acute discomfort may be experienced.
'
Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional elevation
through the heel of the shoe shown in Figs. 1
' uous exercise is undertaken and they are un
ments no adjustments can be made. Such adjustments are necessary and often desirable, as
_
Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the shoe illustrated
in Fig. 1, Figs. 1 and 2 showing an Oxford or
-
Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a high shoe hav
ing incorporated therein means constructed in
accordance with the invention for correcting and
supporting the cuneiform or metatarsal arch; and
Fig. 5 is a plan view of the lifting and sup
porting strap.
The invention briefly described consists of an
article of footwear having a strap or sling at
tached to the inside thereof over the heel and
2
adapted to pass under the cuneiform bones of
the wearer's foot and embrace this portion of the
foot and, furthermore, to pass over the instep
and to be secured to a fixed strap or support on
the outside of the wearer's foot. The strap is
attached inside the shoe under the outer edge
' of the heel portion and is so shaped as to sup
port the heel portion of the root without cutting
into the heel and, as will be hereinafter described,
10 the sling or support exerts an upward and rear
ward pressure, thus a?ecting a rolling action on
the foot to bring the cuneiform bones and the
- metatarsals connected thereto back to their nor
mal or correct position and to exert a rearward
15 pull on the metatarsals which have fallen due to
the incorrect adjustment of the cuneiform bones.
Further details of the invention will appear
from the following description.
.
In the particular embodiment of the inven
tion illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, there is shown
adjusting sling or strap is fixed at the point Ii
shown in Fig. 3, the strap will be swung upward
ly about the fixed end thereof which is disposed
over the heel portion of the insole and at the
outer edge thereof.
a
In Fig. 4 the invention has been shown as ap
plied to a man's high shoe and it is obvious that
the invention is of general application and can
be used on any type or form of man’s or wo
man's shoe desired. In other words, it is appli
cable to sport‘ shoes, low or high heel shoes. san
dals, or any other desired form of foot wear.
It will be obvious from the foregoing specifi
cation that the .use of the correcting and ad
justing means described will effectively correct 15
and place in. adjustment the bones of the foot,
thus overcoming what is generally known as
fallen arches and raising the cuneiform bones
and lifting and pulling the metatarsals back
into their correct position of adjustment. Fur
an Oxford or low shoe comprising a heel ID, a ‘ thermore, this adjustment of the bones can be
shank II, a sole i2 and an upper IS. The upper carried out progressively until they have been re—
I3 is split or divided, as shown at ll, the di
adjusted or replaced in their correct positions.
vided portions being laced together by a lace II.
A tongue I6 is disposed within the split por
tion II.
The foot correcting and supporting means
consists of a strap, band or sling 20 which has
one end 21 secured above the heel and folded
30 under the portion oi’ the insole 22 which extends
over the heel l0. The strap 20 then extends
- across the upper portion of the heel end of the
insole, as shown at 2!, and then upwardly along
the inner surface oi’ the outer portion of the
counter, as shown at 24, and over the instep,
as shown at 25.
-
The outer rear portion of the upper is slotted,
as shown at 26, and the free end of the strap 2|
extends through the slot, as shown in ‘the draw
ing. This end of the strap is adjustably se
cured to a strap 30 which is fixed between the
upper and the heel and is provided with a buckle
ll of any suitable construction. The end of the
strap 20 is adjustably secured by said buckle
to the strap 30, this adjustment being deter
mined by the condition of the wearer's foot and
the amount of correction and support desired.
From the showing in Fig. 1 it will be seen
that the instep portion 25 of the strap 20 is dis
posed inside of the tongue l6 and if desired
this portion of the strap may replace or be used
instead of the usual tongue.
From the showing in the drawing it will be
seen that the end 2| of the strap is relatively
narrow, but that the strap is broadened as it
extends across the bottom of the shoe and up
wardly along the inner surface of the counter
and across the instep. This is desirable since
the strap forms a sling or support for the foot
and should be sumciently broad to form an ade
quate and comfortable support beneath the foot
and also to prevent the strap from cutting into
the instep.
'
It should be particularly noted that the por
65 tion 23 of the strap is disposed beneath the
heel of the wearer and extends forwardly and
upwardly» and then over the instep and down
wardly and rearwardly. This form of construc
tion causes the support to exert a rearward pull
on the metatarsals in addition to a lift on the
arch and the cuneiform bones and also an up
ward and outward rolling action on the cunei
form bones which returns them to their correct
positions.
Since. as above described, the supporting and
Although, in the form of the invention illus~
trated, the free end of the correcting and ad
justing strap is shown as extending through the
shoe upper and as being secured to a strap se
cured on the outer surface on the outside of the
shoe, it is obvious that other means may be pro
vided for securing the free end of the support 30
ing and correcting‘ strap. It is essential, how
ever, that the inner end of the strap be secured
at the bottom over the heel portion of the shoe
at the outer edge of the heel and be carried across
the heel above the inner surface of the inner C:
portion of the counter and over the instep.
Although one specific embodiment of the in
vention has been particularly shown and de
scribed, it will be understood that the invention
is capable of modification and that changes in 40
the construction and in the arrangement of
the various cooperating parts may be made with
out departing from the spirit or scope of the
invention, as expressed in the following claims.
What I claim is:
45
1. In a shoe having a heel, shank, sole and up
per, means constructed and arranged to exert
an upward and outward pull on the cuneiform
bones and an upward and rearward pull on the
metatarsals, said means consisting of a strap or
sling of a width effective to substantially embrace
the cuneiform bones, having one end secured
within the shoe rearwardly of the heel breast
and extending across the shoe, forwardly and up
wardly to a position to underlie the central area
of the longitudinal arch of the foot, and thence
to extend over the instep, downwardly and rear
wardly, and means for adjustably securing the
free end thereof.
,
2. In a shoe having a heel, shank, sole and up
per, means constructed and arranged to exert an
upward and outward pull on the cuneiform bones
and an upward and rearward pull on the met
atarsals, said means consisting of a strap or sling
of a width effective to substantially embrace the
cuneiform bones, having one end secured with
in the shoe rearwardly of the heel breast and ex
tending across the shoe, forwardly and upwardly
to a position to underlie the‘ central area of the I
longitudinal arch of the foot, and thence to ex
tend over the instep, downwardly and rearwardly,
and means for adjustably securing the free end
thereof, said strap being tapered in width from
the inner fixed end to the portion extending from
2,110,440
the instep to the securing means, and being wid
est adjacent the side of the upper.
3. In a shoe having a heel, shank, sole and up
per, means constructed and arranged to exert
an upward and outward pull on the cuneiform
bones and an upward and rearward pull on-the
metatarsals, said means consisting of a strap or
sling of a width effective to substantially embrace
the cuneiform bones, having one end secured
within the shoe rearwardly of the heel breast
10
and extending across the shoe, forwardly and
3
upwardly to a position to underlie the central
area of the longitudinal arch of the foot, and
thence to extend over the instep, downwardly
and rearwardy, and means for adjustably secur
ing the free end thereof, said strap being tapered
in width from the inner ?xed end to the portion
extending from the instep to the securing means,
and being widest adjacent the side of the upper
through an area spaced substantially above the
sole of the shoe.
‘VIDA L. MOORE.
10
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